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268 publications were found on Fruit,-Vegetable-and-Ornamental-Production
  • 1999 Corn Performance Tests (RR 661) Corn performance trials were conducted at six locations throughout Georgia in 1999. Short-season, mid-season, and full-season hybrids were planted at Tifton, Plains, and Midville in the coastal plain region, at Griffin in the Piedmont region, at Calhoun in the limestone valley region, and at Blairsville in the mountain region. High oil corn hybrids were tested at Tifton and Plains. Hybrids used fo…
  • 2000 Corn Performance Tests (RR 668) Corn performance trials were conducted at six locations throughout Georgia and two locations in Florida in 2000. Short-season, mid-season, and full-season hybrids were planted at Tifton, Plains, and Midville in the coastal plain region, at Griffin in the Piedmont region, at Calhoun in the limestone valley region, at Blairsville in the mountain region, and at Quincy and Jay in the panhandle region …
  • 2001 Corn Performance Tests (RR 675) Corn performance trials were conducted at six locations throughout Georgia and two locations in Florida in 2001. Short-season, mid-season and full-season hybrids were planted at Tifton, Plains and Midville in the coastal plain region, at Griffin in the Piedmont region, at Calhoun in the limestone valley region, at Blairsville in the mountain region and at Quincy and Jay in the panhandle region of …
  • 2010 Georgia Corn Performance Tests (AP 101-2) This publication includes the results of the 2010 corn performance trials. Corn performance trials were conducted at six locations throughout Georgia in 2010. Short-season and mid-season hybrids were planted at Tifton, Plains, and Midville in the Coastal Plain region, at Griffin in the Piedmont region, at Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region, and at Blairsville in the Mountain region. Hybrids us…
  • 2011 Georgia Corn Performance Tests (AP 101-3) In this research report, the results of the 2011 corn performance trials are presented. Corn performance trials were conducted at six locations throughout Georgia (see map inside back cover) in 2011. Short-season and mid-season hybrids were planted at Tifton, Plains and Midville in the Coastal Plain region, at Griffin in the Piedmont region, at Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region and at Blairsv…
  • 2012 Georgia Corn Performance Tests (AP 101-4) In this research report, the results of the 2012 corn performance trials are presented. Corn performance trials were conducted at six locations throughout Georgia in 2012. Short-season and mid-season hybrids were planted at Tifton, Plains, and Midville in the Coastal Plain region, at Griffin in the Piedmont region, at Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region, and at Blairsville in the Mountain regio…
  • 2013 Georgia Corn Performance Tests (AP 101-5) In this research report, the results of the 2013 corn performance trials are presented. Short-season and mid-season hybrids were planted at Tifton, Plains, and Midville in the Coastal Plain region; at Griffin in the Piedmont region; at Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region; and at Blairsville in the Mountain region. Hybrids used for silage were evaluated at Tifton, Griffin, Calhoun, and Blairsvil…
  • 2013 Vegetable Crops Research Report (AP 113) This publication contains a report of research trials done on vegetable crops in Georgia in 2013.
  • 2014 Georgia Corn Performance Tests (AP 101-6) In this research report, the results of the 2014 corn performance trials are presented. Short-season and mid-season hybrids were planted at Tifton, Plains, and Midville in the Coastal Plain region; at Griffin in the Piedmont region; at Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region; and at Blairsville in the Mountain region. Hybrids used for silage were evaluated at Tifton, Griffin, Calhoun, and Blairsvil…
  • 2014 University of Georgia Vidalia Onion Extension and Research Report (AP 114) This publication is a report of 2012-2014 onion research variety trials and Extension activity at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
  • 2014/2015 Vegetable Crop Variety Trial and Research Report (AP 115) This publication is a report of research and Cooperative Extension trials conducted on cole crops, beans and peas, sweet corn, cucurbits, peppers, and tomato at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
  • 2015 Georgia Corn Performance Tests (AP 101-7) In this research report, the results of the 2015 corn performance trials are presented. Short-season and mid-season hybrids were planted at Tifton, Plains, and Midville in the Coastal Plain region, at Griffin in the Piedmont region, at Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region, and at Blairsville in the Mountain region. Hybrids used for silage were evaluated at Tifton, Griffin, Calhoun, and Blairsvil…
  • 2015 Southeast Regional Organic Blueberry Pest Management Guide (AP 125-1) This publication provides Southeast-specific information on approved National Organic Program (NOP) disease and pest management options for blueberry production and addresses the issues most commonly encountered under the unique growing conditions of the Southeast U.S. This publication is not intended to provide all details on organic blueberry production, although it does include the production m…
  • 2016 Georgia Corn Performance Tests (AP 101-8) In this research report, the results of the 2016 corn performance trials are presented. Short-season and mid-season hybrids were planted at Tifton, Plains, and Midville in the Coastal Plain region, at Griffin in the Piedmont region, at Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region, and at Blairsville in the Mountain region. Hybrids used for silage were evaluated at Tifton, Griffin, Calhoun, and Blairsvil…
  • 2018 Georgia Corn Performance Tests (AP 101-10) This research report presents the results of the 2018 corn performance trials. Corn performance trials were conducted at six locations throughout Georgia (see map inside back cover) in 2018. Short-season and mid-season hybrids were planted at Tifton, Plains, and Midville in the Coastal Plain region, at Athens in the Piedmont region, at Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region, and at Blairsville in …
  • 2019 Corn, Sorghum Grain and Silage, and Summer Annual Forages Performance Tests (AP 101-11) This research report presents the results of the 2019 corn, sorghum and summer annual forage performance trials. Trials were conducted at seven locations throughout Georgia, depending on the crop. These included Tifton, Plains, and Midville in the Coastal Plain region, Athens and Griffin in the Piedmont region, Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region, and Blairsville in the Mountain region. Hybrids…
  • 2019 Vegetable Extension and Research Report (AP 113-1) This report provides research and extension results for trials conducted by the University of Georgia Vegetable Team and its collaborators in 2019. Contributing authors include county and regional faculty as well as specialists from UGA's horticulture, plant pathology, crop and soil sciences, and entomology departments.
  • 2020 Georgia Plant Disease Loss Estimates (AP 102-13) 2020 plant disease losses in Georgia, including control costs, amounted to an estimated $806 million. The value of the crops used in this estimate was approximately $6.712 billion, resulting in a 12.01% relative disease loss across all crops included in this summary. The estimated values for most crops used to compute these disease losses are summarized in the 2020 Georgia Farm Gate Value Report (…
  • 2020 Southeast Regional Strawberry Integrated Pest Management Guide for Plasticulture Production (AP 119-1) This regional integrated pest management guide provides recommendations for strawberry production in the Southeastern U.S. Recommendations are based on information from the manufacturer’s label and performance data from research and Extension field tests. This publication is intended for use only as a guide. Specific rates and application methods are on the pesticide label, and these are subject t…
  • 2020 Vegetable Extension and Research Report (AP 113-2) This report provides research and extension results for trials conducted by the University of Georgia Vegetable Team and its collaborators in 2020. Contributing authors include county and regional faculty as well as specialists from UGA's horticulture, plant pathology, crop and soil sciences, and entomology departments.
  • 2020 Vidalia Onion Extension and Research Report (AP 114-2) This annual publication includes a report of 2019-20 onion research variety trials and Extension activity at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. The report contains the results of research awarded by the Vidalia Onion Commodity Commission.
  • 2021 Georgia Plant Disease Loss Estimates (AP 102-14) 2021 plant disease losses, including control costs, amounted to an estimated $889 million. The value of the crops used in this estimate was approximately $7690 million, resulting in a 11.6% relative disease loss across all crops included in this summary. For most crops, the estimated values used to compute these disease losses are summarized in the UGA Center for Agribusiness & Economic Developmen…
  • 2021 Southeast Regional Blueberry Integrated Management Guide (AP 123-1) Integrated pest management information for blueberry producers in the Southeastern U.S. Recommendations are based on information from the manufacturer’s label and performance data from research and Extension field tests. This publication is intended for use only as a guide. Specific rates and application methods are on the pesticide label, and these are subject to change at any time.
  • 2021 Southeast Regional Caneberry Integrated Management Guide (AP 121-1) The 2021 Southeast Regional Caneberry Integrated Management Guide covers topics such as pesticide stewardship and safety, insect and disease control, pre-transplant and transplant operations, fungicide and insecticide efficacy comparisons and spray schedules, weed management, wildlife damage, and more. Recommendations are based on information from the manufacturer’s label and performance data from…
  • 2021 Southeast Regional Organic Blueberry Pest Management Guide (AP 125-2) This publication provides Southeast-specific information on approved National Organic Program (NOP) disease and pest management options for blueberry production and addresses the issues most commonly encountered under the unique growing conditions of the Southeast U.S. This publication is not intended to provide all details on organic blueberry production, although it does include the production m…
  • 2021 Southeast Regional Strawberry Integrated Pest Management Guide for Plasticulture Production (AP 119-2) The 2021 edition of this regional integrated pest management guide provides recommendations for strawberry production in the Southeastern U.S. Recommendations are based on information from the manufacturer’s label and performance data from research and Extension field tests. This publication is intended for use only as a guide. Specific rates and application methods are on the pesticide label, and…
  • 2021 Vegetable Extension and Research Report (AP 113-3) This report provides research and extension results for trials conducted by the University of Georgia Vegetable Team and its collaborators in 2021. Contributing authors include county and regional faculty as well as specialists from UGA's horticulture, plant pathology, crop and soil sciences, and entomology departments. All research has been supported by the Georgia Vegetable Commodity Commission.
  • 2022 Southeast Regional Blueberry Integrated Management Guide (AP 123-2) The 2022 edition of this publication covers integrated pest management information for blueberry producers in the Southeastern U.S. Recommendations are based on information from the manufacturer’s label and performance data from research and Extension field tests. This publication is intended for use only as a guide. Specific rates and application methods are on the pesticide label, and these are …
  • 2022 Southeast Regional Caneberry Integrated Management Guide (AP 121-2) The 2022 Southeast Regional Caneberry Integrated Management Guide covers topics such as pesticide stewardship and safety, insect and disease control, pre-transplant and transplant operations, fungicide and insecticide efficacy comparisons and spray schedules, weed management, wildlife damage, and more. Recommendations are based on information from the manufacturer’s label and performance data from…
  • 2022 Southeast Regional Muscadine Grape Integrated Management Guide (AP 126-1) This new regional integrated pest management guide provides recommendations for muscadine grape production in the Southeastern U.S. Recommendations are based on information from the manufacturer’s label and performance data from research and Extension field tests. This publication is intended for use only as a guide. Specific rates and application methods are on the pesticide label, and these are …
  • 2022 Southeast Regional Strawberry Integrated Pest Management Guide For Plasticulture Production (AP 119-3) The 2022 edition of this regional integrated pest management guide provides recommendations for strawberry production in the Southeastern U.S. Recommendations are based on information from the manufacturer’s label and performance data from research and Extension field tests. This publication is intended for use only as a guide. Specific rates and application methods are on the pesticide label, and…
  • 2022 Vegetable Extension and Research Report (AP 113-4) This report provides research and extension results for trials conducted by the University of Georgia Vegetable Team and its collaborators in 2022. Contributing authors include county and regional faculty as well as specialists from UGA's horticulture, plant pathology, crop and soil sciences, and entomology departments. All research has been supported by the Georgia Commodity Commission for Vegeta…
  • 2022 Vidalia Onion Extension and Research Report (AP 114-3) This is an annual report highlighting research conducted during 2021 and 2022 for Vidalia onions. Research topics include: variety trials, irrigation and fertilizer strategies, sulfur content in soils, effect of fertilizers on yield, thrips, factors affecting postharvest incidence of bacterial bulb rot, and Botrytis leaf blight.
  • 2023 Georgia Ag Forecast Series: 2023 Corn, Soybean, and Wheat Outlook (AP 130-1-06) 1. The Russia-Ukraine war and Mexico’s plan to ban genetically modified corn from the United States will increase uncertainty regarding corn prices. 2. The United States and the world will continue to have a tight wheat supply in 2023, supporting higher than average wheat prices. 3. The low ending stocks of U.S. soybeans indicate the need for more soybeans. Ending stocks might improve in 2023, lea…
  • 2023 Georgia Ag Forecast Series: 2023 Fruits and Tree Nuts Outlook (AP 130-1-04) 1. The three major U.S. peach-producing states experienced a significant fall in production which cumulatively reduced our 2022 production by 15%. Since it is difficult to predict whether the weather and water shortage that contributed to the decrease in production will persist, chances are that the situation may improve in 2023, but not by much. 2. The significantly high price received by…
  • 2023 Georgia Ag Forecast Series: 2023 Vegetables and Pulses Outlook (AP 130-1-05) 1. Although the total U.S. fresh vegetable and harvested area decreased by 7% in 2021 compared to 2020, the harvested area is expected to improve in 2023—but not enough to offset 2021. 2. Total vegetables and pulses imports were $18.6 billion in 2021, an increase of 10.2% compared to 2020. This import trend is expected in 2023 despite the supply chain disruption. 3. Production i…
  • 2023 Georgia Ag Forecast Series: Green Industry 2023 (AP 130-1-12) 1. 2022 was a good year for many green industry firms, with many firms seeing increased profits. 2. There are many unknowns going into 2023 that will impact green industry sales, including higher inflation and interest rates, mixed signals within the economy, and the impact of varying strength of the housing market in Georgia. 3. Green industry sales in Georgia are projected to be similar to 2022 …
  • 2023 Southeast Regional Blueberry Integrated Management Guide (AP 123-3) The 2023 edition of this publication covers integrated pest management information for blueberry producers in the Southeastern U.S. Recommendations are based on information from the manufacturer’s label and performance data from research and Extension field tests. This publication is intended for use only as a guide. Specific rates and application methods are on the pesticide label, and these are …
  • 2023 Southeast Regional Bunch Grape Integrated Management Guide (AP 131-1) This is a new annual guide for managing diseases, insects, weeds, and wildlife in bunch grapes in the Southeast. This regional integrated pest management guide provides recommendations based on information from the manufacturer’s label and performance data from research and Extension field tests. This publication is intended for use only as a guide. Specific rates and application methods are on th…
  • 2023 Southeast Regional Caneberry Integrated Management Guide (AP 121-3) This integrated pest management (IPM) guide for blackberry and raspberry production includes management of diseases, insects, and weeds through IPM principles. The 2023 Southeast Regional Caneberry Integrated Management Guide covers topics such as pesticide stewardship and safety, insect and disease control, pre-transplant and transplant operations, fungicide and insecticide efficacy comparisons a…
  • 2023 Southeast Regional Muscadine Grape Integrated Management Guide (AP 126-2) This 2023 update to the regional integrated pest management guide provides recommendations for muscadine grape production in the Southeastern U.S. Recommendations are based on information from the manufacturer’s label and performance data from research and Extension field tests. This publication is intended for use only as a guide. Specific rates and application methods are on the pesticide label,…
  • 2023 Southeast Regional Organic Blueberry Pest Management Guide (AP 125-3) This publication provides updated (2023) Southeast-specific information on approved National Organic Program (NOP) disease and pest management options for blueberry production and addresses the issues most commonly encountered under the unique growing conditions of the Southeast U.S. This publication is not intended to provide all details on organic blueberry production, although it does include t…
  • 2023 Southeast Regional Strawberry Integrated Pest Management Guide Focused on Plasticulture Production (AP 119-4) The 2023 edition of this regional integrated pest management guide provides recommendations for strawberry plasticulture production in the Southeastern U.S. Recommendations are based on information from the manufacturer’s label and performance data from research and Extension field tests. This publication is intended for use only as a guide. Specific rates and application methods are on the pestic…
  • 2023 Vegetable Extension and Research Report (AP 113-5) This report provides research and extension results for trials conducted by the University of Georgia Vegetable Team and its collaborators in 2023. Contributing authors include county and regional faculty as well as specialists from UGA's horticulture, plant pathology, crop and soil sciences, and entomology departments. All research has been supported by the Georgia Commodity Commission for Vegeta…
  • 2024 Georgia Ag Forecast Series: 2024 Corn, Soybean, and Wheat Outlook (AP 130-2-06) 1. Tighter margins are expected in 2024 for corn, soybeans, and wheat as commodity prices are forecast to be lower and input prices are expected to be flat. 2. Growing demand for sustainable biodiesel fuels will slow soybean price declines relative to the decline in corn prices. 3. Expect more acres planted to soybeans and fewer acres planted to corn and wheat.
  • 2024 Georgia Ag Forecast Series: 2024 Fruits and Tree Nuts Outlook (AP 130-2-10) 1. High prices for peach producers helped a strong producer price index in the 2022–2023 crop season. The PPI is expected to stay strong in 2024. 2. Favorable prices came from production shortages, caused by bad weather in Q1 of 2023 that devasted the Georgia and South Carolina peach industries. 3. Citrus experienced the lowest production recorded in 50 years, and growers now prefer fresh market c…
  • 2024 Georgia Ag Forecast Series: 2024 Vegetables and Pulses Outlook (AP 130-2-11) 1. Total harvested area of vegetables and pulses decreased by 3.2% from 2021 to 2022, and fresh and processed vegetable area harvested decreased by 5.1%; the situation is expected to deteriorate in 2024. 2. 2022 total imports of vegetables and pulses were $18.7 billion, an increase of 11.1% compared to 2021; this import trend is expected to continue. 3. Per capita vegetable consumption may increa…
  • 2024 Georgia Ag Forecast Series: Green Industry 2024 (AP 130-2-12) 1. 2023 was a good year for many green industry firms, but not as good as 2020–2022. 2. The unknowns going into 2024 include higher inflation and interest rates, mixed signals within the economy, increased input costs, and variability in the housing market. 3. Green industry sales in Georgia are projected to be lower than 2023 levels.
  • 2024 Southeast Regional Blueberry Integrated Management Guide (AP 123-4) The 2024 edition of this publication covers integrated pest management information for blueberry producers in the Southeastern U.S. Recommendations are based on information from the manufacturer’s label and performance data from research and Extension field tests. This publication is intended for use only as a guide. Specific rates and application methods are on the pesticide label, and these are …
  • 2024 Southeast Regional Muscadine Grape Integrated Management Guide (AP 126-3) This 2024 update to the regional integrated pest management guide provides recommendations for muscadine grape production in the Southeastern U.S. Recommendations are based on information from the manufacturer’s label and performance data from research and Extension field tests. This publication is intended for use only as a guide. Specific rates and application methods are on the pesticide label,…
  • 2024 Southeast Regional Strawberry Integrated Pest Management Guide Focused on Plasticulture Production (AP 119-5) The 2024 edition of this regional integrated pest management guide provides recommendations for strawberry plasticulture production in the Southeastern U.S. Recommendations are based on information from the manufacturer’s label and performance data from research and Extension field tests. This publication is intended for use only as a guide. Specific rates and application methods are on the pestic…
  • A Guide for Commercial Production of Vinca (B 1219) Vinca is a specialty ornamental crop with very distinct requirements. This bulletin will address those requirements and cover a typical production schedule and crop budget.
  • A preliminary comparison between manual and mechanical pruning the muscadine juice cultivar 'Carlos' (B 1536) Results from this study are preliminary, as only 2 years of data have been collected. Research over longer periods of time will be more revealing about how mechanical pruning will impact the perennial crop yield and health of the vineyard. Mechanical pruning is an option for dormant pruning ‘Carlos’ in situations where labor is unreliable and/or there is a low labor-to-acreage ratio which preclude…
  • Alternatives to Petroleum-Based Containers for the Nursery Industry (B 1407) Beginning in the 1970s, container nursery production acreage rapidly increased such that container nursery production is now the dominant method of nursery production. As a standard in the industry, plastic nursery containers are lightweight, durable, familiar to growers, work well with automation, and can be reused or recycled. However, they are limited in their ability to be sustainably eco-frie…
  • Alternatives to Synthetic Herbicides for Weed Management in Container Nurseries (B 1410) Weed management is one of the most critical and costly aspects for container nursery production. High irrigation and fertilization rates create a favorable environment for weed growth in addition to crop growth. Weeds can quickly out-compete the crop for light and other resources, reducing the rate and amount of crop growth as well as salability. Weed management in nursery production is most effec…
  • An Introduction to Conservation Tillage for Vegetable Production (B 1539) Conservation tillage with agronomic crops (i.e., cotton, corn, soybeans, etc.) has been successful in Georgia production. Such production practices have several benefits, the most notable being the elimination of soil erosion. Other benefits include but aren't limited to increases in soil organic matter, maintaining a healthy rhizosphere (root-zone soil), reduction of riparian and waterway polluti…
  • An Introduction to Organic High Tunnel Tomato Production in Georgia and Florida: Horticultural Tactics (B 1552) This publication is an introduction to high tunnel production that focuses on horticulture aspects of organic tomato production. Diseases and insect pests are not covered, but high tunnel construction, siting, shading, fertility, and irrigation of organic tomatoes are addressed.
  • Aphids on Flowering Ornamental Plants in the Landscape (C 1246) An introduction to and information on the biology, damage, and management of aphids in the ornamental landscape.
  • Athena: A New Training System for Bunch Wine Grapes (B 1527) The Athena bunch wine grape training system was developed by the University of Georgia to increase crop yield in modest-yielding cultivars. The Athena is a divided-canopy system retrofit to the industry standard single-canopy trellising system with vertical shoot positioning. Athena training involves laying four canes and dividing the canopy through a series of cross arms fastened to the vineyard …
  • Azalea Bark Scale (C 1260) Azalea bark scale (ABS) poses a serious threat to azaleas, rhododendron, and Pieris (Andromedas) in Georgia. ABS is a soft scale insect; the nymph and female soft scales secrete a protective coating of waxy crust on their body that cannot be separated from the scale insect. ABS also is found on blueberry, hawthorn, huckleberry, poplar, and willow. ABS is found in cracks or crevices in the surface …
  • Bacterial Diseases of Onions in Georgia (B 1534) Bacterial diseases are among the major production and economic challenges that onion growers face in Georgia. There are six bacterial diseases that commonly affect onion foliage and bulbs in the state. These diseases are difficult to manage and rely mainly on cultural practices and the use of protective bactericides. Host resistance is limited with little information on pathogen biology and the in…
  • Bacterial Leaf Scorch of Blueberry (C 922) A new disease has been identified in the Georgia blueberry production region. This disease has been named “bacterial leaf scorch." This publication includes identification and control methods.
  • Bagworms in Urban Landscapes (C 1237) An introduction to bagworms, along with their biology, how they damage landscapes, and management options.
  • Beneficial Insects of Pecan Trees (C 1229) Accurately distinguishing insect pests from beneficial arthropods is a critical component in the implementation of an effective and sustainable pest management program. This circular provides a succinct and practical summary of natural enemies commonly found in pecan orchards in the Southeast U.S.
  • Biochar Basics Series: Biochar Basics: An Introduction to Biochar as a Container Substrate Component (C 1292-01) Additional author: Mengmeng Gu, Professor, Colorado State University Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture. Biochar has been proposed to be beneficial to the environment and plants. However, many people do not know what biochar is, what can biochar do, or how biochar can be used. In Part 1 of this publication, we provide introductory information on biochar used to partially replac…
  • Biochar Basics Series: Biochar Basics: Biochar Properties and Making the Right Biochar Mix (C 1292-04) Additional author: Mengmeng Gu, Professor, Colorado State University Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture. Container substrates must fulfill several functions for plant growth: create a suitable environment for root growth, physically support them, hold nutrients and water, and enable gas exchange between the roots and the atmosphere. Suitable physical and chemical container subst…
  • Biochar Basics Series: Biochar Basics: Effects on Plant Disease (C 1292-03) Additional author: Mengmeng Gu, Professor, Colorado State University Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture. How does biochar play a role in a plant-disease system? Briefly, before the pathogen infects plants, biochar can improve plant growth by increasing water and nutrient uptake, a healthier plant may be more resistant to attack. On the other hand, after a pathogen infects the pl…
  • Biochar Basics Series: Biochar Basics: Effects on Plant Growth (C 1292-02) Additional author: Mengmeng Gu, Professor, Colorado State University Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture. Is Biochar Good or Bad for Plant Growth? Mixing biochar into soilless substrates may have negative, zero, or positive effects on plant growth. Biochar made from green waste mixed with peat at 50% by volume has been shown to increase prayer plants' total biomass and leaf surf…
  • Biology and Management of Scale Insects in Ornamentals (C 1186) Scale insects are common pests of landscape trees and shrubs that are often overlooked when scouting. Scales can be responsible for chlorosis, branch die-back, and ultimately, plant death. Scales are broadly categorized as either soft scales or armored scales. Soft scales produce a soft, cottony, powdery, or waxy substance that cannot be separated from the scale body. Common soft scales in Georgia…
  • Biology and Management of Stubby-Root Nematodes on Onion (C 1211) Stubby-root nematodes, Paratrichodorus minor, are considered an important pest of onions in Georgia. Low to high population densities of this nematode were observed in multiple fields in the Vidalia area causing damage to sweet onions. The most obvious aboveground symptoms of stubby-root nematode nematode infection are poor, stunted growth of onion seedlings. Stubby-root nematodes have a wide host…
  • Biology and Management of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug in Ornamental Landscapes (C 1248) The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys, is a landscape and agricultural pest in the United States. It was introduced from Asia in the mid-1990s, and quickly spread to the entire United States because of its overwintering behavior. They seek dark and dry sites—such as a vehicle parked near trees—in the fall in which to overwinter. It is established in the Piedmont region of the Ge…
  • Blackberry Harvesting and Postharvest Handling (C 1282) This circular covers basic postharvest harvesting, handling and cold storage principles for fresh-market blackberries to ensure the highest possible shelf-life and quality while minimizing postharvest losses. Blackberries are harvested in Georgia from mid-May to August. Most varieties grown in Georgia were developed by the University of Arkansas breeding program. The blackberry varieties cultivate…
  • Blanc du Bois (C 1274) ‘Blanc du Bois’ has made a significant contribution to wine production in southeastern regions where Pierce’s disease is prevalent. Though possessing resistance or tolerance to Pierce’s disease, Phylloxera, and powdery mildew, this cultivar is not without fault, and it does require an intensive integrated pest management (IPM) program. We cover here the major issues observed with this cultivar.
  • Blossom-End Rot and Calcium Nutrition of Pepper and Tomato (C 938) The purpose of this publication is to introduce the problem of blossom-end rot and provide a guide to effectively diagnose and treat this problem.
  • Blueberry Harvesting and Postharvest Handling (C 1269) This circular covers basic postharvest harvesting, handling and cold storage principles for fresh-market blueberries to ensure the highest possible shelf-life and quality while minimizing postharvest losses. Blueberries are harvested in Georgia from late April to late June. Southern highbush varieties are harvested early in the season while rabbiteyes ripen toward the end of the season. It is impo…
  • Blueberry Irrigation Water Quality (C 1105) This circular is a review of water quality standards, calculations, and recommendations for water that will be used for irrigation of blueberries.
  • Blueberry Pre-Establishment (C 1267) This publication covers the considerations producers need to have in mind when choosing a site to plant blueberry. It describes the soil characteristics that are needed to grow and produce blueberry, how to identify good soil, soil drainage, and how prior crops could affect blueberry productivity.
  • Blueberry Production (C 1278) This publication covers a brief history of the development of blueberries, plus general production requirements such as varieties, chill hours, soil considerations, etc. The southern highbush blueberry is a hybrid that requires fewer chill units compared to northern highbush types, allowing the state of Florida, southern areas, and Georgia to produce fruits in the U.S. market during March, April, …
  • Budding and Grafting of Pecan (B 1376) Individuals who propagate trees have their own personal preferences with regard to propagation methods. As with many practices related to pecan production, timing is important for successful propagation.
  • Cane Blight of Blackberry (C 894) Cane blight can be a major disease of blackberry in the Southeast, resulting in severe losses. The wet, humid conditions observed in Georgia and other southeastern states allow for significant losses following pruning or other injuries to the primocane.
  • Cantaloupe and Specialty Melons (B 1179) This publication was compiled to meet the needs of the growing cantaloupe industry in Georgia. Its 10 chapters represent the latest information available on successful cantaloupe and specialty melon production.
  • Care of Holiday and Gift Plants (C 951) Flowering and foliage plants can make welcome gifts. How long they remain attractive may be directly related to the care and handling they are given. This publication describes ways to properly care for holiday and gift plants to ensure maximum longevity.
  • Chemical Nematicides for Control of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in Georgia Vegetable Crops (B 1502) Soil fumigants alone or in combination with nonfumigant nematicides can provide vegetable growers effective and reliable control of plant-parasitic nematodes, profitable yield and product quality, and increased profits. Treating soil with fumigant nematicides has been very beneficial to vegetable growers in Georgia, but environmental concerns may restrict the broad usage of these products. Telone …
  • Chilli Thrips: Biology and Management in the Nursery (C 1210) Chilli thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis, is an invasive thrips species in the U.S. Currently, chilli thrips infest more than 150 crops worldwide, including strawberries, cotton, tea, citrus, and peppers, as well as many ornamental plants. The pest has become increasingly problematic in nurseries because of its wide host range, small size, and rapid reproduction and development. Chilli thrips quickly …
  • Citrus Fruit for Southern and Coastal Georgia (B 804) Citrus plants are very versatile around the home and may be used as individual specimens, hedges or container plants. Their natural beauty and ripe fruits make them attractive additions to the South Georgia home scene. Cold-hardy varieties that receive recommended care may grow successfully in the coastal and extreme southern areas of the state (and to a lesser degree in more northern locations).
  • Classic City Garden Awards Series: 2016's Best New Plants from the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia (AP 116-4) New ornamentals have long been considered the lifeblood of the green industry. This publication contains recommendations for best-performing new annuals based on research conducted at the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia, showcasing the plants that were awarded the Classic City Award in 2016.
  • Clover Management in Pecan Orchards (B 1360) An orchard floor provides a working surface for orchard operations and influences activities in the trees, which produce the crop. An efficient orchard floor cover does not compete heavily with trees for moisture and nutrients and is compatible with orchard insect populations. While weed competition with tree roots is significant throughout the life of the tree, in a newly planted orchard, weed co…
  • Commercial Blueberry Inventory and Prospectus, Georgia, 2002 (RR 693) Both rabbiteye and highbush blueberries are produced in Georgia. The plants can produce a commercially viable crop for years. The long-term nature of the investment in the blueberry orchard calls for periodic updates on the situation of the blueberry industry. Information about the location of plants, varieties, plant age, and the use of cultural practices are important in decisions to alloc…
  • Commercial Freeze Protection for Fruits and Vegetables (B 1479) Freeze protection efforts should be based on the type of freeze, temperature, and wind speed that is impacting your crop. To apply frost protection, consider your crop value, the freeze protection capacity of your system, and the crop's susceptibility to injury at each growth stage.
  • Commercial Okra Production (C 627) Okra is grown in every county in Georgia. Okra can be a profitable crop when recommended production practices are followed.
  • Commercial Pecan Spray Guide (B 841) This publication provides guidance for insect, disease, and weed control in commercial pecan orchards for 2024.
  • Commercial Production and Management of Cabbage and Leafy Greens (B 1181) The 11 topics covered in this publication are all integral parts of a successful cabbage/leafy greens management program. Each topic focuses on a particular aspect of production and provides information on the latest management technology for that phase of production. It is hoped that the information contained in this publication will assist growers in improving profitability.
  • Commercial Production and Management of Carrots (B 1175) The 13 topics covered in this publication are all integral parts of a successful carrot management program. Each topic is designed to focus on a particular aspect of production and provide the latest management technology for that phase of production. It is hoped that the information contained in this publication will assist growers in improving profitability in carrot production.
  • Commercial Production and Management of Pumpkins and Gourds (B 1180) The seven topics covered in this publication are all integral parts of a successful pumpkin/gourd management program. Each topic is designed to focus on a particular aspect of production and provide the latest management technology for that phase of production. It is hoped that the information contained in this publication will assist growers in improving profitability.
  • Commercial Production of Vegetable Transplants (B 1144) Producing greenhouse-grown containerized transplants is an increasingly popular way to establish vegetable crops. Compared to field-grown transplants, greenhouse transplants have several advantages. They can be produced earlier and more uniformly than field-grown plants. Their growth can be controlled more easily through fertility and water management and they can be held longer and harvested when…
  • Commercial Snap Bean Production in Georgia (B 1369) This is an in-depth publication covering Culture and Varieties, Soils and Fertility, Irrigation, Sprayers, Diseases, Insect Management, Weed Control, Food Safety and Sanitation, Harvest/Post-Harvest and Waste Management, Marketing, Production Costs, and Organic Production of commercial snap bean production in Georgia.
  • Commercial Southern Pea Production (C 485) This horticulture publication is about the commercial production of southern peas.
  • Commercial Squash Production (C 527) Squash (Cucurbita spp.) is a member of the cucurbit family, which consists of a number of warm-season vegetables. Another broad group of squash called winter squash. Each group is classified into several types based on fruit shape and color. Warm-season squash are harvested while immature while winter squash are harvested at maturity.
  • Commercial Tomato Production Handbook (B 1312) This publication is a joint effort of the seven disciplines that comprise the Georgia Vegetable Team. It is comprised of 14 topics on tomato, including history of tomato production, cultural practices, pest management, harvesting, handling and marketing. This publication provides information that will assist producers in improving the profitability of tomato production, whether they are new or exp…
  • Commercial Watermelon Production (B 996) Watermelon is a warm-season crop related to cantaloupe, squash, cucumber and pumpkin. Watermelons can be grown on any well-drained soil throughout Georgia but are particularly well adapted to the Coastal Plain soils of South Georgia. Watermelons will continue to be an important part of vegetable production in the state. Increases in average yield per acre will continue as more growers adopt plasti…
  • Common Tomato Diseases in Georgia (B 1285) This publication contains information about common tomato diseases in Georgia. It includes photographs and descriptions of diseases such as buckeye rot and fusarium wilt.
  • Considerations for the Small Market Vegetable Producer (C 1090) Growing vegetables as either a part-time or full-time enterprise can be an enjoyable and rewarding experience. Not only can you produce fresh food for your own table, you can provide supplemental income to your family’s budget. While that may sound great, there are several considerations to bear in mind before you jump into this endeavor. Items to consider before becoming a small market grower inc…
  • Consumer Demand for Fresh Fruits and Vegetables in the U.S. (1960-1993) (RB 431) Price and expenditure elasticities at the retail level between 1960 and 1993 were estimated for 11 fresh fruits and 10 fresh vegetables by employing a composite demand system approach and using annual data. Most fresh fruits and vegetables were found to respond significantly to changes in their own prices but insignificantly to changes in expenditures. The study partially incorporated the interdep…
  • Controlling Insects on Summer Squash in the Home Garden (C 1177) Summer squash is one of the most popular warm season vegetables grown in home gardens. Unfortunately, the levels of insect attacks on summer squash have risen dramatically over the last 10 years. Safe and effective controls are needed to help produce this important crop with all of the pressures of insect pests. This publication will discuss both organic and non-organic solutions for homeowners to…
  • Controlling Lace Bugs on Ornamental Grasses (C 1143) The grass lace bug, Leptodictya plana Heidemann (Hemiptera: Tingidae), has been recently reported as a pest of ornamental grasses in Georgia. It is closely related to, and resembles, the sugarcane lace bug, L. tabida (Herrich-Schaeffer). The lace bug thrives in warm, dry conditions, and the recent drought in the Southeastern U.S. may have contributed to the grass lace bug’s recent emergence as a s…
  • Conversion Tables, Formulas and Suggested Guidelines for Horticultural Use (B 931) Pesticide and fertilizer recommendations are often made on a pounds per acre and tons per acre basis. While these may be applicable to field production of many crops, orchardists, nurserymen and greenhouse operators often must convert these recommendations to smaller areas, such as row feet, square feet, or even per tree or per pot. Thus pints, cups, ounces, tablespoons and teaspoons are the commo…
  • Corn Production Safety and Health for Farmers (B 1333) This publication addresses safety issues inherent to corn production before and during a corn production season. We have divided safety issues into General Health and Safety, Corn Harvest, Corn Grain Bin, and Augers. Safety tips are presented that should be reviewed by anyone involved with corn production on the farm.
  • Cowpea Curculio in Southern Pea (C 1038) This publication describes ways to identify and manage cowpea curculio damage in Southern pea.
  • Crape Myrtle Culture (C 944) Crape myrtle is one of the most useful flowering shrubs/trees grown in Georgia. It provides abundant summer color with a minimum of maintenance.
  • Cultural Management of Commercial Pecan Orchards (B 1304) In order for a commercial pecan operation to be consistently successful, the goal of the operation should be annual production of a moderate crop of high quality nuts, rather than the production of a high yield in a single given year. Culturally, there are several basic factors that will help to promote optimum profitability with a commercial pecan orchard.
  • Cultural Management of the Bearing Peach Orchard (C 879) When the peach tree moves into its bearing years a shift in emphasis from exclusive attention to vegetative development for building a tree structure to maintaining a balance enough vegetative growth to promote adequate fruiting wood and return bloom for the following season’s fruit crop and managing the current season’s fruit crop.
  • Dahlias (C 576) Dahlias are among the most spectacular flowers you can grow in your garden. Hundreds of varieties are available, with flower sizes ranging from 1 to 14 inches in diameter. Almost any color except true blue can be produced in Georgia. In exchange for their beauty, dahlias require dedicated care. Most of them need special soil preparation, staking, watering during dry periods, disbudding and a stric…
  • Deer-Tolerant Ornamental Plants (C 985) If deer are overabundant in your neighborhood, and deer herd reduction or management is not feasible, a good way to prevent deer browsing in landscapes is to plant ornamental plants that deer do not like to eat.
  • Designing Research and Demonstration Tests for Farmers' Fields (B 1177) As farmers and farm advisers, you make many management choices during a growing season. For example, you may have to decide which cultivar to plant, which herbicide to use, how frequently to apply a fungicide, and what rate of nematicide to use. Often the information needed to make the best decision is available to you, but when it is not available you can frequently compare the options by conduct…
  • Development and Control of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in Carrots (B 1545) Carrots suffer significant yield losses from nematode pests because the harvested edible product (taproot) is directly affected by nematode infection, resulting in reduced marketable yield and quality. Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are widespread in several counties in South Georgia and cause serious damage to carrots. Stubby-root (Paratrichodorus or Nanidorus spp.) and root-lesion (Praty…
  • Diagnostics System for Crop History and Disorders in Greenhouses and Nurseries (B 1273) This diagnostic system is designed as a tool to assist growers, Extension specialists and county agents to diagnose problems with ornamental crops. The document consists of six major sections and five appendices. Each section is designed to supply information on various important aspects of the crop under scrutiny.
  • Diseases of Leyland Cypress in the Landscape (B 1229) Leyland cypress has become one of the most widely used plants in commercial and residential landscapes across Georgia as a formal hedge, screen, buffer strip or wind barrier. Leyland cypress (x Cupressocyparis leylandii) is a graceful, rapidly growing evergreen tree that is adapted for growth within the 6-10a USDA hardiness zones. Leyland cypress is considered relatively pest-free; however, becaus…
  • Dormant Spur and Cane Pruning Bunch Grapevines (B 1505) This bulletin is intended to provide to provide both veteran and new growers an overview of commercially popular pruning strategies and a greater depth of understanding of the theory behind pruning method practice. Dormant pruning is an important vineyard management decision as it sets the crop level and canopy density before green tissues are present. Growers must take several considerations into…
  • Drip Chemigation: Injecting Fertilizer, Acid and Chlorine (B 1130) Drip irrigation is an important component of vegetable production systems in Georgia. Drip irrigation is more desirable than other irrigation methods for several reasons. Two important advantages are (1) water conservation and (2) potentially significantly improving fertilizer management. Fertigation is the timely application of small amounts of fertilizer through drip tubes directly to the root z…
  • Drip Irrigation in Pecans (B 936) Research conducted on drip-irrigated pecans in Georgia over the past several years has shown that drip irrigation is highly beneficial even in wet years. The objective of drip irrigation is to supply each plant with sufficient soil moisture to meet transpiration demands. Drip irrigation offers unique agronomic, agrotechnical and economic advantages for the efficient use of water.
  • Essential pH Management in Greenhouse Crops: pH and Plant Nutrition (B 1256) Your goal as a greenhouse grower is to maintain a stable pH over the life of the crop. This is not an easy task since many factors can affect pH in the growing substrate. The pH can go up or down within several weeks of the crop cycle and if you wait for deficiency or toxicity symptoms to develop, you have already compromised the health of the crop and you r profits. Knowing all factors involved i…
  • Establishing a Pecan Orchard (B 1314) A well-planned, organized orchard will be more efficient, require less input and offer larger potential returns. Select the orchard location based on its soil type, drainage, water table and land topography. Straight rows in planted orchards make maintenance, irrigation and harvest easier. Tree growth and spacing requirements can also be anticipated for the early planting and subsequent orchard th…
  • Evaluating Fruit Quality of Citrus Varieties in Georgia, 2020-21 (AP 127-1) The commercial citrus industry in Georgia has only recently been established, with most groves planted after 2014. Initially, satsuma mandarins (Citrus unshiu) on trifoliate rootstocks (Poncirus trifoliata) were planted for their cold-hardiness, seedlessness, and ease of peeling. Satsuma fruits begin to attain commercial maturity in early November and usually avoid hard freezes in southern Georgia…
  • Evaluating Fruit Quality of Citrus Varieties in Georgia, 2021 (C 1275) The commercial citrus industry in Georgia has only recently been established, with most groves planted after 2014. Initially, satsuma mandarins (Citrus unshiu) on trifoliate rootstocks (Poncirus trifoliata) were planted for their cold-hardiness, seedlessness, and ease of peeling. Satsuma fruits begin to attain commercial maturity in early November and usually avoid hard freezes in southern Georgia…
  • Evaluating Fruit Quality of Citrus Varieties in Georgia, 2021-22 (AP 127-2) Note: This publication contains data from an average of the 2020-21 and 2021-22 orange harvest seasons (exceptions noted in the chart). The commercial citrus industry in Georgia has only recently been established, with most groves planted after 2014. As of 2022, approximately 75% of the 3,300 acres of citrus planted in Georgia are satsumas, but that proportion is trending downward. To strengthen t…
  • Exobasidium Leaf And Fruit Spot of Blueberry (C 1142) Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot, caused by the fungus Exobasidium maculosum, is an emerging disease affecting both southern highbush and rabbiteye blueberries. In addition to direct yield loss due to fruit drop, lesions on remaining fruit compromise the aesthetic qualities of the fruit as well as the taste, rendering them unmarketable. This circular provides the most current knowledge of this impo…
  • Experiments and Observations on Growing Mayhaws as a Crop in South Georgia and North Florida (C 966) Limited information is available on the commercial production of mayhaws; thus, the objective of our research has been to: 1) determine if mayhaws are adapted to commercial orchard production, 2) identify cultivars with excellent cropping ability and quality, and 3) identify potential problems in their commercial production, such as insects and diseases.
  • Extending the Growing Season for Lettuce in Georgia Using Shade Cloth and High Tunnels (C 1241) Georgia growers can reliably produce lettuce in shaded high tunnels to capitalize on summer markets. This publication is an overview of using shading to grow lettuce in a high tunnel during the summer season when it is too hot to grow in the field.
  • Fall Vegetable Gardening (C 1258) This publication covers fall vegetable production including planting dates, spacing, general culture of cool-season vegetables planted in Georgia in the fall. Many people consider the end of summer to be the end of gardening season. However, there is a whole other world of vegetables that can be planted in the fall garden in Georgia. Temperatures are milder, and there generally are fewer insects a…
  • Fertilizer Injectors: Selection, Maintenance and Calibration (B 1237) Fertilizer injectors are devices used to apply water-soluble fertilizers, pesticides, plant growth regulators, wetting agents and mineral acids during crop production. They are a vital part of modern greenhouse or nursery operations. Despite the advantages, many growers have had at least one experience with a compromised, damaged or even ruined crop where the cause was traced to a malfunctioning i…
  • Fertilizing Blueberries in Pine Bark Beds (B 1291) Grower experiences have proven milled pine bark to be an excellent growing substrate for southern highbush blueberries. Although milled pine bark shares many characteristics with good blueberry soil, fundamental differences exist and need to be understood for rapid growth of young plants and high blueberry yields.
  • Field Guide to Ambrosia Beetles of Agricultural Importance in the Eastern and Southern United States (C 1239) This pocket field guide provides a summary of the common economically damaging species of ambrosia beetles in the Eastern and Southern U.S. It includes an easy-to-use morphological identification guide, external and internal plant-injury descriptions to help in infestation diagnosis, and trapping guidelines and protocols for researchers, Extension agents, and growers. The finished printed size of …
  • Fireblight: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment (C 871) Fireblight is a destructive, highly infectious, and widespread disease. It attacks blossoms, leaves, shoots, branches, fruits, and roots. This publication has some facts and methods to avoid and control the disease.
  • Flatheaded appletree borer: A pest of trees in nurseries and landscapes (C 1261) The flatheaded appletree borer is a polyphagous pest—so called because it feeds on multiple tree species—native throughout North America. Flatheaded appletree borers impact specialty crops such as fruit, nut, and ornamental trees. Nursery growers in Georgia face mild to moderate levels of infestation depending on the local beetle population size and favorable environmental conditions. Adult flathe…
  • Foliage Products: An Opportunity for the Georgia Ornamental Industry (B 1262) The majority of the plants used for interior decoration are considered “foliage plants” because of the highly decorative value of their leaves. Most of them originated in tropical and subtropical areas of the world and are adapted to low light levels, making them a natural choice for interior environments.
  • Fresh Market Broccoli Production for Georgia (B 1460) Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. variety italica) is grown throughout Georgia in both the fall and spring growing seasons. A locally significant wholesale industry has developed in southwest Georgia in recent years, and acreage devoted to broccoli production has increased. The wholesale broccoli industry fills a market window in late fall, through winter, and into early spring. Plantings also occur …
  • Fusarium Wilt of Watermelon in Georgia (B 1485) Watermelon production faces many challenges in Georgia. The warm, humid climate favors numerous foliar diseases. Because of the long history of watermelon production in Georgia, soilborne diseases such as Fusarium wilt also present challenges to growers. This bulletin will provide background on disease symptoms, pathogen survival and infection, pathogenic races, and management.
  • Gardening in Containers (C 787) Growing plants in containers differs from growing plants in the ground. Poorly drained potting mixture can lead to root problems. Under conditions of excess moisture and poor aeration, roots become stressed and are easily invaded by root rotting fungi. Under these circumstances, plants fail to grow properly or even die. In addition to guidance on soil preparation, this bulletin provides informati…
  • Georgia 2017 Corn Performance Tests (AP 101-9) In this research report, the results of the 2017 corn performance trials are presented. Short-season and mid-season hybrids were planted at Tifton, Plains, and Midville in the Coastal Plain region, at Griffin in the Piedmont region, at Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region, and at Blairsville in the Mountain region. Hybrids used for silage were evaluated at Tifton, Griffin, Calhoun, and Blairsvil…
  • Georgia Corn Diagnostic Guide (B 1221) The field is a complex environment with many factors that can interact to influence the growth of a corn plant. These factors can be living in the form of insects, diseases, nematodes and weeds; or, they can be non-living such as weather, nutrients or chemicals. In the proper combination of factors, corn can produce more than 200 bushels per acre in the Southeast; or in a totally unfavorable combi…
  • Georgia Green*A*Syst: Environmental Checklist for Nurseries, Greenhouses and Turfgrass Producers (B 1366) Georgia's nurseries, greenhouses and turfgrass businesses are major contributors to Georgia's growing economy, to the beauty of Georgia homes and businesses, and to a better quality of life. When used appropriately, the products and services provided by these businesses enhance the environment of their customers. Thus, it only makes sense that these businesses should use management practices that …
  • Georgia Grown Pomegranates: A Source of Powerful Phytonutrients (B 1548) Pomegranate is an emerging crop that has been experiencing a significant expansion in Georgia. Pomegranates are excellent sources of sugars, soluble fibers, vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals, including polyphenols with strong antioxidant activity. Because of their nutritional content, pomegranates are considered functional foods (foods that provide health benefits in addition to basic nutriti…
  • Georgia Onion Research-Extension Report 2012 (AP 109) This publication is a report of 2011-2012 onion research variety trials and Extension activity at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
  • Georgia Pest Management Handbook Series: Forestry and Christmas Trees (SB 28-18) Commercial insect and weed control in forestry and Christmas trees. Updated annually.
  • Georgia Pest Management Handbook Series: Fruit and Nuts (SB 28-19) Commercial insect and weed control in fruits and nuts. Updated annually.
  • Georgia Pest Management Handbook Series: Ornamentals (SB 28-23) Commercial insect and weed control in ornamentals. Updated annually.
  • Georgia Pest Management Handbook Series: Vegetables (SB 28-34) Commercial insect and weed control in vegetables. Updated annually.
  • Grape Sour Rot (C 1212) Although grape sour rot can occur in drier climates, the disease complex tends to be especially problematic during wine grape ripening in wet, humid regions. Browning and disintegrating berries and the aroma of vinegar (acetic acid) are a few symptoms that characterize grape sour rot. Sour rot ultimately results in crop yield reduction as damaged berries often “shatter,” or fall off the clusters. …
  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Irrigation and Technology Assessment (B 1275) The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establis…
  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Management Assessment (B 1276) The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establis…
  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Quality Assessment (B 1277) The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establis…
  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Recycling and Water Reuse Assessment (B 1278) The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establis…
  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Source Use and Expansion Assessment (B 1274) The Greenhouse*A*Syst publication Series has been developed to assist greenhouse owners with the task of assessing three management issues: Water management, Environmental Risk and Business Profitability. This publication will also help you establish a water conservation document you may find useful if and when state or local water authorities develop policies or implement water restrictions. Most…
  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Use Regulation, Legislative Awareness and Company Water Policy Assessment (B 1279) The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establis…
  • Greenhouses: Heating, Cooling and Ventilation (B 792) This publication contains comprehensive, in-depth information about heating, cooling and ventilating greenhouses.
  • Ground Covers for Shaded Landscapes in North Georgia (C 1238) This circular discusses the most common ground covers, both native and non-native plants, that are suitable for culture in North Georgia landscapes in shaded areas.
  • Growing Bamboo in Georgia (B 1357) This booklet is written in an attempt to filter through much of the available information and make a simple, user-friendly information guide on growing bamboo in Georgia, which has a wide variety of soils and temperate zones.
  • Growing Dogwoods (C 900) One of the most widely planted ornamental trees in Georgia is the flowering dogwood. Dogwoods are not difficult to grow if they are located in the proper site and if healthy trees are purchased and planted properly.
  • Growing Vegetables Organically (B 1011) This publication is a comprehensive guide to growing vegetables organically, including location, planning, irrigation, soil preparation, composting, fertilizers, successive planting and crop rotation, mulching and insect control.
  • Hedge Pruning Pecan Trees in the Southeastern U.S. (B 1557) As pecan trees grow in an orchard, their tree canopies encroach upon one another, causing excessive shading, which can increase alternate bearing intensity and reduce tree health and orchard profitability. Historically, limb pruning and tree removal have been the most common methods of dealing with this problem, particularly in the low-light environment of the southeastern United States. Mechanica…
  • Herbicide Injury of Pecan Trees (C 1146) Georgia pecan orchards are often found growing adjacent to fields of annual row crops, timber, and pastures. As a result, the tree canopies of these orchards are susceptible to injury from herbicide drift from the adjacent operations when herbicide applications are made under conditions unsuitable for spraying. Drift may also occur when cotton fields are sprayed with chemical defoliants in the fal…
  • Home & Garden Georgia Pest Management Handbook Series: Home Orchard (SB 48-05) This section of the Home & Garden Edition covers pest control in home orchards, including apples, peaches, bunch grapes, muscadines, strawberries, blueberries, and other fruits. Beginning in 2022, the Home & Garden Edition has been updated biennially. When purchasing a product based on a first-year recommendation of the Handbook, check the current product label before purchase to be sure it is sti…
  • Home & Garden Georgia Pest Management Handbook Series: Ornamentals (SB 48-10) This section of the Home & Garden Edition covers pest control in ornamentals, such as indoor plants, flowers, shrubs, and ground covers. Beginning in 2022, the Home & Garden Edition has been updated biennially. When purchasing a product based on a first-year recommendation of the Handbook, check the current product label before purchase to be sure it is still labeled for the use for which you are …
  • Home Garden Series: Georgia Homegrown Tomatoes (B 1271) This publication discusses the basics of growing tomatoes successfully, as well as avoiding common problems encountered by the home gardener.
  • Home Garden Series: Growing Home Garden Sweet Corn (C 905) Sweet corn is not difficult to grow and, by following the cultural guidelines provided in this publication, you too can enjoy this sweet delicacy.
  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Apples (C 740) Apples are adapted to most areas of Georgia. Although the northern half of the state is best suited for the more "conventional" apple varieties, you can have success in the southern half of Georgia with adapted varieties.
  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Bunch Grapes (B 807) Bunch grapes are often called “pod” grapes in rural Georgia since they produce large clusters of fruit. Georgia's climate is not well-suited to home garden production of European bunch grapes, but American bunch grapes and hybrids between the two species (French hybrids) grow well in Georgia. If grapes are well cared for and sprayed when diseases and insects threaten, you can expect yields of 20 t…
  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Muscadines (C 949) Muscadines are truly a fruit for the south. Although muscadines can be grown successfully in most parts of the state, they are best adapted to the Piedmont and Coastal Plain areas.
  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Peaches (C 1063) Growing peaches and other fruit trees in Georgia and the southeastern United States is challenging. Peaches are not native to North America; however, many cultivars have been developed for our area, and Georgia has a long history of successful peach production. One must choose the site and the proper cultivar and provide care throughout the year to be successful. This publication includes inform…
  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Potatoes (C 1011) This publication discusses selecting the right types of potatoes, proper planting, maintenance and troubleshooting problems.
  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Raspberries and Blackberries (C 766) Blackberries and raspberries are one of the most popular fruits to grow and they are among the easiest for the home gardener to successfully produce. Blackberries and raspberries come as erect types (no trellis required) and trailing types (trellis required), depending on the varieties selected. This publication discusses growing raspberries and blackberries in a home garden.
  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Strawberries (C 883) Strawberry beds need a small area that receives full sun most or all day to get started. Strawberries will grow well in many types of soil, but the most desirable soil is fertile, medium-light in texture, well drained and with good moisture-holding capacity.
  • Home Garden Series: Homegrown Summer and Winter Squash (C 993) Squash are very nutritious, have high fiber content and are high in vitamins A and C. Squash are not difficult to grow. This publication gives information on type selection, planting, harvesting and storage. It also gives you tips on the problems with insects and diseases you may encounter.
  • Homegrown Carrots (C 1232) Homegrown carrots have a unique freshness and juiciness to them and are much more flavorful than their store-purchased counterparts. This publication covers the basics of how to select and grow carrots in the Georgia garden, including planting, maintenance, problems, and variety selections.
  • Homegrown Pumpkins (C 1206) While pumpkins are edible and grown for both their flesh and seeds, they are more commonly used as fall decorations. This member of the cucurbit family can be found in a variety of shapes, sizes, and colors. While pumpkins are not very difficult to grow, they do require a substantial amount of space for their sprawling vines. Selecting the right cultivar and following good cultural practices are k…
  • How to Generate Income on 20 Acres or Less (B 1551) The idea of producing your own food in a clean, controlled environment is very appealing. While dreams may be big, careful research and planning should be done prior to jumping into any farm venture. Important items such as desire, capital, feasibility, labor, demographics, and marketing all need to be considered.
  • Hurricane and Wind Damage to Trees and Shrubs in Nurseries (C 1149) Damage to perennial woody trees and shrubs caused by hurricanes or high wind events is often not initially apparent. In some cases, it can take months or even years to manifest, despite plants looking relatively healthy after initial inspection by growers and insurance adjustors. This publication describes common damage seen in perennial woody trees and shrubs after a hurricane or high wind event.
  • Insect Pests of Non-bearing Pecan Trees (C 1228) As Georgia's pecan production acreage has increased, reports of insect pests that attack younger, less established trees have also increased, particularly infestations by pecan bud moth and ambrosia beetles. This circular summarizes the pertinent insect pests that attack young, non-bearing pecan trees, including key details on their biology, injury, monitoring, and management. This information sho…
  • Introduction to Wine Grape Trellising, Training, and Pruning Terms (C 1162) There are many ways to manage grapevine growth, and many grape-growing regions implement unique and preferred training methods. Vine growth management is achieved by applying a trellising system, which is a framework of metal cross arms, wires, and support posts that are used to direct grapevine vegetation to maximize fruit quality and production. Trellising and pruning combinations will sometimes…
  • Irrigation Reference Guide for Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, and Soybeans (C 1189) A farm’s return on investment is directly affected by the way water is applied to its crops. The wrong end-gun settings can result in overwatering or underwatering large portions of field acres. Clogged or partially clogged nozzles lead to obvious water shortages that can be visually observed or measured using yield monitors. Systems not properly checked and maintained can lead to significant loss…
  • Japanese Maple Scale: A Nursery and Landscape Pest (C 1168) The Japanese maple scale (JMS), Lopholeucaspis japonica Cockerell, is an insect pest of Japanese maples and several other ornamental tree species. This insect sucks out plant juices using its piercing and sucking mouthparts. Because JMS, similar to other armored scales, does not directly feed on the phloem vessels of the host tree, the insect does not ingest excessive amounts of sugars to excrete …
  • Landscape Basics: Crop Rotation and Cultural Practices Help Reduce Diseases in Seasonal Color Beds (B 1423) Landscape professionals must consider many factors when choosing the right flowering annuals to plant for a particular location. Primary considerations include high visual impact, consistent bloom for color, foliage for texture and color, sun exposure, growth habit and low-water tolerance. Cost plays an important role as well. Many landscapers typically choose common annual ornamentals and tropica…
  • Landscape Basics: Success with Herbaceous Perennials (B 1424) Whether in a commercial installation or residential garden, perennial plants can be successfully used to offer more landscaping choices, distinguish your firm from the competition and create a niche for your landscape business. Perennial plants are complex, and it is best to contract or hire a professional landscape architect for the design phase and train knowledgeable staff in proper maintenance…
  • Landscape Plants for Georgia (B 625) This publication includes a list of good plants for Georgia organized into various sizes and groups. The design qualities of plants—their form, size, color and texture—are emphasized according to the principles and requirements of good landscape design and plant maintenance. Hardiness and disease and insect resistant qualities are also considered.
  • Lantana Lace Bug Biology and Management (C 1262) The lantana lace bug, Teleonemia scrupulosa Stål (Tingidae: Hemiptera), is a serious pest of lantana (Lantana camara L.). Although lantana is regarded as an invasive weed both in the United States and worldwide, many popular cultivars continue to be planted in residential and public ornamental landscapes and gardens. Previously, the lantana lace bug was deliberately introduced to several countries…
  • Low-Volume Irrigation Systems for Blueberry with Chemigation and Fertigation Suggestions (B 1504) Drip, trickle, microemitters, and subsurface irrigation systems are considered low-volume irrigation. Low-volume irrigation systems are designed to improve irrigation efficiency, delivering water to the crop accurately with minimal water loss. Irrigation efficiency can be categorized into two main concepts: water loss and uniform application. If water loss is significant, or application uniformity…
  • Maintaining Commercial Citrus in Georgia (B 1520) Dooryard citrus has been grown in Georgia for decades, but growing citrus commercially is new to Georgia growers. This publication addresses problem prevention, maintenance, insects, diseases, and some physiological issues of concern in Georgia. The time of year to address maintenance, insects, disease, and physiological issues is projected. Many of the production practices in Georgia are similar …
  • Management Recommendations for Spotted Wing Drosophila in Organic Berry Crops (B 1497)
  • Managing Fruit and Vegetable Waste (C 988) The production, harvest, sorting and packing of fruits and vegetables produces close to a billion pounds of produce annually. These processes also result in material that is rotten, has bad spots, or is removed from packing lines. Properly dealing with discarded products can reduce the potential for environmental pollution while also protecting the individual who is responsible for the discarded m…
  • Managing Organic Refuse: Options for Green Industry Professionals (C 982) This publication explains some of the options available to Green Industry professionals for dealing with these organic materials.
  • Managing Root-Knot Nematodes in Georgia Watermelons (B 1529) Root-knot nematodes are highly adaptable, obligate plant parasites (parasites that cannot reach adulthood without a host) that attack plant roots and establish a prolonged relationship with their hosts. There are three common species of root-knot nematodes known to parasitize watermelon in the U.S.: the southern root-knot, M. incognita, the peanut root-knot, M. arenaria, and the Javanese root-knot…
  • Maximizing the Value of Georgia-Grown Satsumas Through Food Innovation (B 1561) Additional author: Emma Moore, Department of Food Science & Technology. Satsuma oranges are a fast-growing commodity in Georgia. Satsumas are natural and excellent sources of sugars, organic acids, soluble fibers, vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, and essential oils. Because of their nutritional content, satsuma oranges are considered functional foods (foods that provide health benefits and esse…
  • Measuring Field Losses from Grain Combines (B 973) Harvest losses can rob you of profit from grain and bean production. Harvest losses of 10 percent or more are not unusual, when they should be in the 2 to 4 percent range. If you do not check losses behind your combine, you have no idea what the losses are and where they occur during harvesting. The following procedure outlines how to measure losses during harvest. It also shows you where the loss…
  • Minor Fruits and Nuts in Georgia (B 992) Many types of fruits and nuts can be grown in Georgia due to our mild climate. This publication provides an outline of the culture and management of the exotic and uncommon fruits and nuts that can be grown in Georgia.
  • Mouse Ear of Pecan (C 893) Mouse ear of pecan is a growth abnormality resulting from a deficiency of nickel in the pecan tree. Only recently, the discovery was made that mouse ear indicates a severe nickel deficiency. The disorder occurs most frequently on newly transplanted trees in established orchards, but can also occur on sites where pecan has not previously been grown.
  • Muscadine Grape Management (C 1303) This phenology-based muscadine grape management poster provides a reference for sound viticultural, disease, and insect management practices in a digestible format. Produced in cooperation with University of Tennessee, North Carolina State University, University of Arkansas, and Auburn University. A publication of the Southern Region Small Fruit Consortium.
  • Native Plants for Georgia Part II: Ferns (B 987-2) There are about 12,000 species of ferns in the world today. Most are found in the tropics. Currently, Georgia is home to 36 genera, 119 species and 12 hybrid ferns. The list is constantly expanding as new plants are found. To grow ferns successfully, it is important to match the site characteristics and growing environment with the native requirements of the fern species you intend to grow. Even i…
  • New Trial Tropical Container Gardens (B 1361) With increased urbanization, container gardens continue to enjoy popularity and brighten up patios and balconies. For many reasons, tropical plants have become a staple in container gardens traditionally filled with herbaceous annuals, bulbs, succulents, perennials and woody plants.
  • Nursery Crop Selection and Market Implications (B 1398) Each year, one of the first questions both seasoned and new nursery producers, managers and owners asks is, “What plants should be propagated and/or grown in the upcoming season(s)?” Answering this question requires a complex equation of inputs ranging from the type of nursery operation that exists to physical location and market trends. For this reason, the answer to this question varies for each…
  • Nutritional, Environmental and Cultural Disorders of Pecan (B 1332) Although many problems regarding pecan production result from pest or disease pressure, the crop may also be adversely affected by nutritional imbalances, nutrient deficiencies, or environmentally induced disorders. These are some of the more difficult problems to diagnose. Some nutrients may be more available than others on certain soil types and under certain soil conditions. Additionally, compl…
  • Onion Production Guide (B 1198) This publication represents the latest information available on the commercial production of short-day onions in south Georgia.
  • Orange Felt (Orange Cane Blotch) of Blackberry (C 892) The orange felt (also known as orange cane blotch) disease of blackberry is prevalent in the south. Where ideal environmental conditions occur, this disease may girdle canes or exacerbate other cane diseases, causing subsequent decline and death.
  • Orchard Sprayers (B 979) This publication contains comprehensive information about air blast and weed control sprayers for orchards.
  • Organic Cool-Season Vegetable Crop Rotations for the Southeast (B 1498) Interest in organic food has been growing over the past twenty years. In Georgia, growing conditions during the summer are particularly difficult for organic producers due to high insect, disease, and weed pressure. However, pest pressures are much reduced when the weather cools. The moderate conditions of late fall to spring are ideal for production of many cool-season crops in the Southeast, inc…
  • Organic Pecan Production (B 1493) Organic food production is one of the fastest-growing sectors of the American food marketplace and is driven largely by personal health preferences and environmental ethics. Organic food sales in the United States rose from $13 billion in 2005 to $35 billion in 2014. Organic farmers are required to follow an ecological soil management program and are restricted in their use of chemicals. In order …
  • Organic Vidalia Onion Production (C 913) This publication discusses organic Vidalia onion production in Georgia, from site selection and harvesting to certification.
  • Pampas Grass (C 983) Pampas grass is a large perennial grass native to Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Mature plants can reach 10 feet tall and 6 feet wide. In late summer, silvery-white plumes rise several feet above the foliage and make a bold, dramatic statement in the landscape.
  • Peach Orchard Establishment and Young Tree Care (C 877) Essential to successful peach tree culture is selection of a location that provides adequate sunlight, cold air drainage and water drainage.
  • Pecan Management (C 1174) This circular is a calendar-based management reference for pecan production in the Southeastern U.S. It provides an easy-to-use graphical guide for management decisions regarding crop phenology, irrigation and fertilization requirements, disease, and insect and mite arthropod pest management. It also includes information on production activities including timing for planting, harvesting, and nutri…
  • Pecan Trees for the Home or Backyard Orchard (B 1348) Pecan trees are commonly found surrounding both urban and rural dwellings throughout Georgia. They can enhance the environment and provide additional income from the sale of nuts. This publication contains comprehensive information about pecan trees for the home or backyard orchard.
  • Pecan Varieties for Georgia Orchards (C 898) The most fundamental step in pecan production is the selection of varieties or cultivars to be planted in the orchard. Planting the wrong pecan variety can be a costly mistake, resulting in considerable expense. This publication includes descriptions and photos of pecan varieties suitable for planting in Georgia orchards.
  • Phony Peach Disease (C 1253) This fact sheet covers phony peach disease: History, symptoms, disease cycle, and management.
  • Plum Curculio: An Incessant Pest of Peaches (C 1224) Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), is a key insect pest of peaches in the Southeast region of the United States. It is a snout beetle native to North America and is found east of the Rocky Mountains in the U.S. and Canada. Plum curculio drives the insect pest management program for Georgia peach producers. This circular covers the biology, damage, and current management recommendation…
  • Pollination of Vegetable Crops (C 934) Plants develop seeds through a process called pollination. Pollination is the transfer of pollen from the stamen (male flower part) to the pistil (female flower part).
  • Pomegranate Production (C 997) Pomegranates have been grown as a common backyard crop for decades in the South. In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the commercial production of the fruit in Georgia and surrounding regions. This production increase is largely in response to increased demand for the fruit by the consumer. The fruit is being used in many consumer products, including tea and juice blends, nut m…
  • Preparing the Packinghouse for Peach Season (C 880) The southeastern peach industry is known for the high quality of its fresh peaches. As a new peach season approaches, it is time to ready the packinghouse for output of the best peach product.
  • Principles of Irrigation and Scheduling for Vegetable Crops in Georgia (B 1511) This bulletin contains guidelines to determine irrigation scheduling for vegetable production in Georgia. Irrigation scheduling varies with water management and growers may require different technologies to properly manage water application. This information is supplied to help irrigation managers schedule and operate irrigation systems to optimal capacity, applying water precisely to the crop for…
  • Production and Management of Garlic, Elephant Garlic and Leek (C 852) This publication discusses how garlic, elephant garlic and leek can be grown successfully in South Georgia.
  • Propagating Deciduous Fruit Plants Common to Georgia (B 818) Deciduous fruit plants common to Georgia must be propagated asexually because they do not come true to seed. This makes it necessary to reproduce the desired fruit plants by methods such as cuttings, runners, layering, budding or grafting. This publication discusses the common techniques used to asexually propagate fruit plants adapted to Georgia.
  • Propagating Disease-Free Blueberry Plants from Softwood Cuttings (B 1540) Propagating disease-free blueberry plants is important for the future sustainability of the blueberry industry in Georgia and the Southeast. Over the past two to three decades, the Georgia blueberry industry has experienced remarkable growth and has become a national leader in blueberry production. To remain competitive, Georgia blueberry producers need a supply of healthy plants to replace older …
  • Pruning Muscadine Grapes (C 1268) Many gardeners don’t realize how vigorously muscadines and grapes must be pruned each season in order to ensure good production. Quality equipment and care also is essential to maintain healthy plants. This video covers the basics of how to properly prune muscadines and bunch grapes. Correct pruning methods are essential for strong fruit production and must be performed annually at the proper time…
  • Quick Storage Guide for Vegetable Crops (C 1205) Vegetables require careful handling, storage, and monitoring to ensure the maximum postharvest life span. Because we are dealing with live organisms, the maximum attainable shelf life of vegetables can easily be affected depending on preharvest and postharvest factors that often manifest during storage. Following storage recommendations for each specific commodity helps to ensure the best quality …
  • Rain Gardens in Home Landscapes (EB 101) This publication includes three parts. Part 1 discusses stormwater as a pollution source for streams and water bodies, and provides a background on why rain gardens in our landscapes have great environmental value. Part 2 includes a thorough definition of rain gardens and their purpose, and gives step-by-step instructions on how to design a rain garden for a specific site. Part 3 discusses appropr…
  • Red Cabbage: Crop Management Practices, Food Safety, and Biochemical Properties (C 1221) Red cabbage is a highly nutritious vegetable crop, rich in minerals, vitamins, and several other chemical compounds that are beneficial for human health, including phenols, proteins, glucosinolates and anthocyanins. While red cabbage belongs to the same group as the other cabbage varieties (white and green) widely produced and consumed in the state, red cabbage production and consumption in Georgi…
  • Reducing Aflatoxin in Corn During Harvest and Storage (B 1231) Aflatoxin is a naturally occurring toxin produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus. The fungus can be recognized by a gray-green or yellow-green mold growing on corn kernels in the field or in storage. Plant stress due to drought, heat or insect damage during fungus growth usually increases aflatoxin levels. Aflatoxin contamination will reduce feeding value and hinder sales. Because it is extremel…
  • Repotting Basics (C 1240) This publication describes the reasoning behind repotting, as well as container selection, drainage, positioning the plant on an appropriate soil base, examining and attending to root issues, potential root removal and/or redistribution, backfilling, protecting, and watering the plant upon completion of repotting. As container plants mature, their biomass increases and the roots grow outward and…
  • Sampling Irrigation Water for Blueberry Production (C 1104) This publication outlines the sampling procedure for irrigation water to be used in blueberry production. Follow the outlined steps to provide a certified lab with a sample that is representative of the irrigation water to be used for growing blueberry plants.
  • San Jose Scale: A Pernicious and Persistent Pest of Peaches (C 1225) San Jose scale, Comstockaspis perniciosus (Comstock), is a pest of peaches, nectarines, plums, and other tree fruits including apples, pears, and cherries. San Jose scale is considered a secondary pest in many regions of the country, but in the Southeast U.S., it has been one of the most common and most destructive pests to the peach industry since the early 2000s.
  • Shipper Sweet Corn in Southern Georgia (B 1549) Summarizes shipper sweet corn production in southern Georgia.
  • Silverleaf Whitefly: A Pest in Nursery and Greenhouse Ornamental Crops (C 1249) The silverleaf whitefly, also known as the sweet potato whitefly or Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), attacks a wide range of plants, from ornamentals to warm-season vegetables. Whiteflies are active from mid-July to mid-October and are found gathered together on the underside of leaves during the daytime. Although 76 whitefly species are known to exist in the Southeastern U.S., only a few …
  • Simple Tree Training Technique for Peaches (C 878) A relatively new peach tree training system is being adopted by some southeastern peach growers; it is an easy, low-maintenance system that can be used even in the home orchard.
  • Small Fruit Video Series Series: Cross-Contamination (C 1300-02) Cross-contamination, resulting in foodborne pathogen contamination of small fruits, can occur at any point throughout production and post-harvest handling. This video discusses techniques and best practices for growers and packers to ensure the production of safe, high-quality small fruits. This video was produced in collaboration with the Auburn Department of Horticulture.
  • Small Fruit Video Series Series: Foodborne Illnesses (C 1300-01) Foodborne illnesses sicken approximately 48 million Americans a year and result in significant financial losses for the food industry. Outbreaks of foodborne illness have been linked to consumption of small fruit products, but growers and packers can take precautions to reduce food safety risks on their operations. This video discusses what foodborne illnesses are, what causes them, and basic step…
  • Small Market Fruit and Vegetable Farming (C 1251) This publication covers some of the basic information about what you may need and key considerations when developing a small fruit and vegetable farm.
  • Soil Preparation and Planting Procedures for Ornamental Plants in the Landscape (B 932) Proper planting is essential for healthy, vigorous growth of ornamental plants in the landscape. It assures rapid plant establishment by providing a favorable environment for the developing root system. This publication offers step-by-step guidelines that will help you achieve planting success.
  • Southeastern Peach, Nectarine, and Plum Pest Management and Culture Guide (B 1171) This guide covers multiple states and production areas. Pest problems vary across the Southeast. Pesticide rates are a guideline. Exceptions are noted for specific locations and pests, but this guide does not list every exception. Listed pesticides may not be registered for the uses recommended here in all states. This guide is to be used only by commercial growers. Observe all label precautions…
  • Southeastern Pecan Growers' Handbook (B 1327) Pecan production is considered by many who practice this endeavor to be as much an art as it is a science. Growers must integrate multiple disciplines in order to be successful. This book was created with the goal of being a comprehensive reference text for pecan growers, scientists, and county agents. It addresses pecan culture and management in the southeastern United States. For more informatio…
  • Southern Highbush Blueberry Marketing and Economics (B 1413) To be more competitive, Georgia blueberry producers have to increase their yields to match or better the average U.S. values. This increase can occur through an improvement of the agricultural practices and a better mastery of blueberry cultivation. This publication contains information to help Southern Highbush blueberry growers in Georgia maximize their profits.
  • Spanish Series: Enfermedades Más Comunes de Plantas Ornamentales en Georgia (B 1238-SP) Esta publicación describe algunas de las enfermedades más problemáticas en las plantas de ornato más usadas en el jardín. El material presentado aquí le ayudará a identificar estas enfermedades y encontrará las recomendaciones para su tratamiento. El conocimiento de estas enfermedades permitirá a los jardineros profesionales y amateurs a combatir estas enfermedades y tener plantas saludables y bel…
  • Spanish Series: Los Arándanos y Su Producción (C 1278-SP) El arándano alto del sur, es un híbrido que requiere pocas horas de frio—una aproximación de cuantas horas la planta requiere estar expuesta a temperaturas de entre 32 a 45 °F para romper la dormancia y empezar iniciación floral—comparado con el arándano alto del norte. Por lo que permite al estado de Florida y áreas del Sur de Georgia posicionarse en el mercado estadounidense en los meses de Marz…
  • Spanish Series: Manejo del Viñedo (C 1151-SP) Este póster del manejo del viñedo está basado en la fenología de la planta y proporciona una referencia para las buenas prácticas de manejo de las enfermedades y los insectos de la vid en un formato atractivo y digerible. Las prácticas vitícolas optimizan la salud, la rentabilidad y la sostenibilidad de los viñedos al mismo tiempo que mejoran la cantidad y calidad del cultivo. Al igual que el mane…
  • Spanish Series: Tizón de Fuego de las Rosáceas: Síntomas, Causas y Tratamiento (C 871-SP) El tizón de fuego de las rosáceas es una enfermedad destructiva, altamente infecciosa y que ocurre en muchas partes del país y es causada por la bacteria Erwinia amylovora. El tizón de fuego es particularmente prevalente en algunos condados de Georgia. La enfermedad puede atacar los botones florales, las hojas, los meristemos apicales, ramas, frutos y las raíces. [Fireblight is a destructive, hig…
  • Staking and Pruning Tomatoes in the Home Garden (C 1150) This publication gives both consumers and small vegetable farm growers options for providing support to their tomatoes in the vegetable garden. The circular covers the basics of how to successfully use different systems of staking to support tomatoes, how to prune and manage tomato plants for a healthier crop, and the benefits of pruning.
  • Starting Plants From Cuttings for the Home Gardener (B 1553) This publication shows home gardeners how to propagate many of their favorite landscape plants from cuttings at a home garden scale, using tools and resources available to them.
  • Strawberry Maturity Indices and Quality (C 1308) In this video, you will learn how to judge the optimum maturity of strawberries for harvest and how to identify the main quality attributes that are important for maximum postharvest shelf life.
  • Success with Mixed Containers Using Perennial and Woody Plants (B 1418) This publication offers information on types of plants suitable for mixed containers, with an emphasis on perennial and woody species and cultivars, as well as aesthetic qualities, cultural conditions and placement within the container.
  • Suggested Blueberry Fertilization Timings and Rates (C 1163) Fertilization is an important practice of maintaining plant health. The blueberry plant is no exception, but there are important considerations when fertilizing blueberries. The rates, timing, and type of fertilizer should be common knowledge for the grower. In this circular, how to fertilize blueberry plants is described with text, diagrams, and calculations to provide growers, Extension agents, …
  • Sweet Corn Variety Evaluation Report: Spring 2020 (AP 120-1) To increase productivity, it's important that growers select sweet corn cultivars adapted to particular growing conditions. The goal of this report is to provide growers, crop advisers, county educators, Extension agents, and specialists with a broad evaluation of different commercial sweet corn hybrids and their performance in different locations of the Southeast U.S.
  • Sweet Potato Production and Pest Management in Georgia (B 1489) Sweet potatoes are members of the Convolvulaceae family, which includes morning glory. They are native to tropical America and are a perennial plant there. In more temperate regions such as the United States, they are frost-sensitive and grown as annuals. Sweet potatoes are grown for their edible root, which is often mistakenly called a tuber, like white or Irish potatoes (Solanum tuberosum). Howe…
  • Tea Scale: Biology and Management in the Nursery and Landscape (C 1201) The tea scale, Fiorinia theae (Hemiptera: Diaspididae), is a serious economic pest of several ornamental plants in nurseries and landscapes in Georgia, including camellias and hollies. Tea scales are armored scales that cause chlorosis (yellowing) of the leaf tissue, and under severe infestations, they can cause plant death. These pests undergo multiple overlapping generations per year and are ver…
  • The New and Improved Chaste Tree (C 1076) Chaste tree (genus Vitex) is an ornamental with many desirable qualities for the urban landscape. It is a deciduous shrub to small tree proffering violet flowers, which are a magnet for pollinators, fragrant foliage, and excellent drought and deer tolerance. It's not surprising that it has been touted as one of the best plants for Georgia gardens. There is always room for improvement on what nat…
  • Top 10 Nursery Production Integrated Pest Management Practices in the Southeast (C 1008) Integrated pest management (IPM) is a sustainable approach to managing pests by combining biological, cultural, physical and chemical tools in a way that minimizes economic, health and environmental risks. One hundred and seventy-eight horticultural producers were surveyed in 2009-10 to determine the IPM practices used by growers in the southeastern U.S. Growers were asked a series of questions ab…
  • Tropical Plants Offer New Possibilities for Georgia Gardens (B 1272) The goals of these investigations were to achieve an aesthetically pleasing landscape while experimenting with mixing various plant habits, leaf textures and colors, and even flowers, and to raise consumer awareness, both at industry and public levels, of the alternative uses of tropical plants in the landscape. This publication presents plant performance data collected over a three-year period in…
  • Troubleshooting Cultural Problems in Tomatoes (C 1089) This publication is intended for general use audiences, including homeowners, civic groups, and master gardeners. It covers the basic troubleshooting procedures for solving common problems while growing tomatoes. It includes a description of both cultural and physiological problems and solutions.
  • Using Surfactants, Wetting Agents, and Adjuvants in the Greenhouse (B 1319) Many pesticides require the addition of an adjuvant, and some do not. When applying fungicides, insecticides or herbicides without a recommended adjuvant, 30 percent to 50 percent reduction in pest control can be expected. Adjuvants may cause damage to a plant if the wrong adjuvant is used or if it is used at too high a concentration. Using the correct adjuvant on a greenhouse crop is a critical d…
  • Vineyard Canopy Management Series: Fruit Zone Management (C 1219) The “Vineyard Canopy Management Series” of Extension circulars reviews a number of canopy-management practices individually. Each circular advises how to effectively implement a canopy-management practice and why it is important to do so. The practices collectively known as “canopy management” aim to maximize canopy leaf exposure, maintain crop yield and quality, decrease disease, and improve vine…
  • Vineyard Canopy Management: Shoot Thinning (C 1152) Shoot thinning is the first seasonal canopy management practice in wine grape vineyards, but shoot thinning is not implemented in muscadine vineyards. Failure to shoot thin results in a highly congested canopy characterized by reduced air flow, high humidity, and extended damp periods. Muscadines can generally tolerate such conditions without adverse effects. Wine grapes grown in crowded fruit zon…
  • Vineyard Frost Protection (B 1490) The vineyard industry is growing across Georgia and across the Eastern United States. Frost is a perennial threat in these regions, and reducing frost risk can save approximately $48,000 per acre in return revenues. Since many growers new to the industry will be planting vineyards, it is important that they are aware of the risk of frost and ways to avoid it. This bulletin also serves as a good re…
  • Visual Guide to Common Bees of Blueberry Fields in Southeast Georgia (C 1295) This visual guide helps people identify common wild bees encountered in blueberry systems. The contribution of wild bees to blueberry pollination has is becoming widely recognized. Proper identification of these insects in the field is critical part of conservation efforts.
  • Viticulture Management (C 1151) This phenology-based viticulture management poster provides a reference for sound viticultural, disease, and insect management practices in a digestible format. Viticultural practices optimize vineyard health, profitability, and sustainability and improve crop quantity and quality. Like pest management, viticultural practices should be implemented in a timely fashion throughout the growing season …
  • Water Use and Irrigation Management for Vegetables in Georgia Series: Water Use and Irrigation Management for Vegetables in Georgia: Solanaceae Crops (C 1216) This publication is part of a series focusing on irrigation scheduling for vegetable crops. It contains basic information on water use and irrigation management using the crop water demand method for Solanaceae crops such as bell peppers, tomatoes, and eggplants.
  • Water Use and Irrigation Management for Vegetables in Georgia Series: Water Use and Irrigation Management for Vegetables in Georgia: Watermelon (Citrullis lanatus) (C 1183) This circular contains the fundamentals of watermelon irrigation scheduling using the crop water demand method. Decisions regarding the timing, frequency, and amount of water required for a crop are some of the most critical factors in vegetable production. There are numerous irrigation scheduling strategies employed by growers, but the crop water demand method of irrigation management is one of t…
  • Watson Training System for Bunch Wine Grapes (B 1522) There are two main trellising system categories: divided and single canopy. Jerry Watson, a grape grower and owner of Austin County Vineyards in Cat Spring, Texas, developed the divided canopy “Watson System” in 2002 to solve some issues he was having with bunch rot management and harvest inefficiency in his ‘Blanc Du Bois’ and ‘Lenoir’ vineyards. By adding a series of cross arms and catch wires t…
  • Weights and Processed Yields of Fruits and Vegetables (C 780) Marketing fresh fruits and vegetables at farmers markets, roadside markets, and pick-your-own farms is an important and growing method of marketing. However, many of the containers used are not practical for consumers.
  • What is a Weather Station and Can it Benefit Ornamental Growers? (B 1475) A weather station is a collection of instruments and sensors measuring atmospheric and soil conditions. Commonly measured environmental variables include light, temperature, relative humidity, rain, wind, and soil conditions (soil moisture, soil temperature, and/or soil bulk electrical conductivity). An on-site weather station allows growers to monitor the microclimate in a growing area. Weather c…
  • Whitefly-Transmitted Plant Viruses in South Georgia (B 1507) The silverleaf whitefly (SLWF), Bemisia tabaci, (also known as sweet potato whitefly) is a pest of a wide variety of horticultural and agronomic crops in southern Georgia. Adults and nymphs (Figure 1) have piercing-sucking mouthparts and feed on phloem, the transport tissue of plants, and remove plant sap. While this direct feeding can damage plants and lead to additional problems with the accumul…
  • Winemaking at Home (C 717) This publication provides essential material and detailed instructions for successfully making wine at home. The information is designed for beginners who do not know where to begin and for experienced amateurs who run into difficulties.
  • Winter Protection of Ornamental Plants (C 872) Cold damage to ornamental plants can be a problem during the winter in the Georgia landscape. Regardless of where you live, recommended practices can maximize the chances that your prized landscape plants will survive the winter.