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Augusta-Richmond County is located on the banks of the Savannah River right on the border of Georgia and South Carolina. While Augusta is well known for the prestigious Master’s Golf Tournament, it also offers a variety of art galleries, shops, music venues, and an abundance of outdoor recreational opportunities. Augusta is also Georgia’s second oldest city.

The University of Georgia Extension Office is located in historic downtown Augusta. Our staff includes a full-time Agricultural Agent, Family & Consumer Science Agent, 4-H Agent, and an Expanded Food & Nutrition Educator, plus several program assistants and two secretaries. Please stop by our office for information on the programs and resources we provide to the citizens of Augusta-Richmond County.


Extension Publications
  • Your Household Water Quality: Odors in Your Water (C 1016) Homeowners sometimes experience unpleasant odors in their household water. In many cases, the exact cause of the odor is difficult to determine by water testing; however, this publication provides a few general recommendations for treating some common causes of household water odors.
  • Native Plants for Georgia Part I: Trees, Shrubs and Woody Vines (B 987) This publication focuses on native trees, shrubs and woody vines for Georgia. It is not our intent to describe all native species — just those available in the nursery trade and those that the authors feel have potential for nursery production and landscape use. Rare or endangered species are not described. Information on each plant is provided according to the following categories: Common Name(s)/Botanical Name/Family, Characteristics, Landscape Uses, Size, Zones and Habitat.
  • Conversion Tables, Formulas and Suggested Guidelines for Horticultural Use (B 931) Pesticide and fertilizer recommendations are often made on a pounds per acre and tons per acre basis. While these may be applicable to field production of many crops, orchardists, nurserymen and greenhouse operators often must convert these recommendations to smaller areas, such as row feet, square feet, or even per tree or per pot. Thus pints, cups, ounces, tablespoons and teaspoons are the common units of measure. The conversion is frequently complicated by metric units of measure. This publication is designed to aid growers in making these calculations and conversions, and also provides other data useful in the management, planning and operation of horticultural enterprises.
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