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About UGA Extension

Your Trusted Local Source

UGA Extension was founded in 1914 to take research-based agricultural information to the people of Georgia. County agents and specialists throughout the state share information on issues like water quality, profitability in agribusiness, family wellness and life skills.

County agents provide soil and water test kits and instruction, advice on safe pesticide use, provide publications and computer programs and teach consumers skills to improve Georgians quality of life. They are the local experts in food safety, proper eating habits, child safety and parenting.

UGA Extension coordinates 4-H, Georgia's largest youth program. Each year, almost 200,000 young Georgians participate in community projects, summer camps and conferences on today's issues while having fun and learning to work together. The leadership skills and responsible values they learn in 4-H last a lifetime. Read More


Extension News
  • Brown-eyed Susan link Brown-eyed Susan is native to most of the country and cold hardy from Texas to Minnesota. By Norman Winter | Published: 8/17/2017
  • Drink Water link Unless you are an athlete, sports drinks are not the best choice for staying hydrated. By Norman Winter, Alexis Roberts | Published: 8/17/2017
  • Peanut Crop link According to UGA Extension agronomist Scott Monfort, there are 828,000 certified peanut acres planted in Georgia this year. By Norman Winter, Alexis Roberts, Clint Thompson | Published: 8/17/2017
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The Bibb County Cooperative Extension Office extends lifelong learning to Georgia citizens through unbiased, research-based education in agriculture, the environment, communities, youth and families.


Upcoming Events
  • Aug 22 - Aug 24 Childcare Provider Workshop Series August 22, 2017 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM Mandated Reporter Child Abuse Training Understand the critical role in protecting children from child abuse by learning the types and signs of abuse and neglect. You will also learn the expectations in Georgia for mandated reporting; the process to follow when reporting and how you can incorporate what you have learned into the policy at your child care facility. August 24, 2017 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM Dare to be Messy The brain is a remarkable sensory processing machine. This workshop is designed to improve the ability of toddlers and preschoolers to play and function in their daily environments. We will explore ideas that support sensory art and positive play. A variety of sensory activities will be highlighted using hands-on participation. Macon, GA
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Extension Publications
  • Native Plants for Georgia Part I: Trees, Shrubs and Woody Vines (B 987) This publication focuses on native trees, shrubs and woody vines for Georgia. It is not our intent to describe all native species — just those available in the nursery trade and those that the authors feel have potential for nursery production and landscape use. Rare or endangered species are not described. Information on each plant is provided according to the following categories: Common Name(s)/Botanical Name/Family, Characteristics, Landscape Uses, Size, Zones and Habitat.
  • Conversion Tables, Formulas and Suggested Guidelines for Horticultural Use (B 931) Pesticide and fertilizer recommendations are often made on a pounds per acre and tons per acre basis. While these may be applicable to field production of many crops, orchardists, nurserymen and greenhouse operators often must convert these recommendations to smaller areas, such as row feet, square feet, or even per tree or per pot. Thus pints, cups, ounces, tablespoons and teaspoons are the common units of measure. The conversion is frequently complicated by metric units of measure. This publication is designed to aid growers in making these calculations and conversions, and also provides other data useful in the management, planning and operation of horticultural enterprises.
  • Vegetable Garden Calendar (C 943) The recommendations in this circular are based on long-term average dates of the last killing frost in the spring and first killing frost in the fall. Every year does not conform to the "average," so you should use your own judgment about advancing or delaying the time for each job, depending on weather conditions.
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