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Blueberries

Overview

Rabbiteye blueberries are native to Georgia and make up most of our commercial production. In 2008, Georgia ranked 4th in blueberry production by producing 41 million pounds. Georgia has more than 16 thousand acres of blueberries.

Blueberries not only taste great, but they're also a good source of vitamin C, iron and fiber. They're cholesterol-free, sodium-free and an important source of potassium. Best of all, blueberries contain only 80 calories per cup.

Blueberries contain a variety of compounds. These include antioxidants, anthocyanosides, bacterial inhibitors, folic acid, vitamins A and C, carotenoids, ellagic acid and dietary fibers. The significance of their presence and modes of action remain largely unexplored.

Research concludes that the antioxidants in blueberries help protect the body against chronic diseases associated with aging. The folic acid may help guard against cervical cancer and may benefit the fetus during pregnancy. Blueberries, like cranberries, also help prevent urinary tract infections.

Blueberries are harvested in Georgia from late May through mid-July. In Georgia blueberries are grown commercially primarily in the southern part of the state. And some are grown in the north Georgia mountains.

Under good management, blueberry bushes will produce some fruit the second or third year after transplanting. By the sixth year they will yield as much as 2 gallons each. The yield will continue to increase for several years as the plants get larger.

Publications

Commercial and Professional Publications

To see other publications, go to the CAES Publications site or the FACS Publications listing.

News

For the latest news about Extension, visit Georgia FACES. News you can use about Georgia family, agricultural, consumer and enviromental sciences.

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External sites