6000 Extension | UGA Cooperative Extension
Hurricane Preparedness and Recovery We offer several resources to help Georgians prepare for and recover from hurricanes and tropical storms. From food safety to flood recovery, view our list of emergency resources and publications.
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Committed to Georgia With county offices across the state, UGA Cooperative Extension offers reliable information and programs in the areas of agriculture, food, health, families, the environment and 4-H youth development. Learn More About UGA Extension
 
Our Expertise Delivered to You Our programs and services include workshops, classes, consultations, certifications, camps and educator resources to help farmers, gardeners, landscapers and families across Georgia. Find Programs and Services
 
Growing Leaders Through 4-H Georgia 4-H is the largest youth development program in the state, helping more than 170,000 young people in grades 5-12 to explore health, science, agriculture and performing arts at camps and conferences. Learn About 4-H Programs
 
Trusted, Free Information UGA Extension publications provide Georgians with free and reliable research-based information on a variety of agricultural, gardening, landscaping and home-related topics. Search for Publications

We're Here To Help Contact your local UGA Extension office or call 1-800-ASK-UGA1 to find out how our team of county agents can assist you.
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Latest News From Around Extension
Irma destroys an estimated 30 percent of Georgia's pecan crop Irma’s destructive path blew through Georgia’s pecan crop, but the destruction could have been much worse, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.
Irma is gone, but she may have left mold behind for Georgia homeowners to tackle Hurricane Irma had slowed down by the time she reached Georgia, reducing the amount of expected structural damage to homes, but flood waters may have left behind a sneaky and dangerous after-effect: mold.
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Irma's winds trimmed limbs and downed trees across Georgia Tropical Storm Irma blew powerful winds of up to 70 mph when she hit Georgia, providing homeowners, tree removal services and insurance companies plenty of work to do. Examining storm-damaged trees can provide insight into why some trees "fail" during windstorms.
Flooded wells need to flushed and tested Hurricanes and tropical storms can cause structural damage, but flood waters can harm families by tainting water supplies. Cities and counties alert citizens with boil advisories when municipal water supplies are affected, but those who rely on wells for water have to monitor their water themselves.
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