Commercial Blueberry Inventory and Prospectus, Georgia, 2002 (RR 693) University of Georgia Extension Both rabbiteye and highbush blueberries are produced in Georgia. The plants can produce a commercially viable crop for years. The long-term nature of the investment in the blueberry orchard calls for periodic updates on the situation of the blueberry industry. Information about the location of plants, varieties, plant age, and the use of cultural practices are important in decisions to allocate resources. This report provides insights otherwise unavailable to the industry yet of important practical consequences. An overview of the Georgia blueberry industry helps to shape the production and marketing strategies that extend beyond the state boundaries. The major portion of the annual crop is shipped to markets outside the region. Furthermore, the increasing value of blueberry plants implies that any damage to the commercial blueberry industry has financial implications for growers and shippers. Summaries included in this report help in accurate assessment of potential economic losses from damages to blueberry plants and the feasibility of programs protecting the value represented by orchards. 2017-03-23 11:57:09.537 2006-06-02 14:35:26.0 Commercial Blueberry Inventory and Prospectus, Georgia, 2002 | Publications | UGA Extension Skip to content

Commercial Blueberry Inventory and Prospectus, Georgia, 2002 (RR 693)

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Summary

Both rabbiteye and highbush blueberries are produced
in Georgia. The plants can produce a commercially viable
crop for years. The long-term nature of the investment in
the blueberry orchard calls for periodic updates on the
situation of the blueberry industry. Information about the
location of plants, varieties, plant age, and the use of cultural
practices are important in decisions to allocate
resources. This report provides insights otherwise unavailable
to the industry yet of important practical
consequences. An overview of the Georgia blueberry
industry helps to shape the production and marketing
strategies that extend beyond the state boundaries. The
major portion of the annual crop is shipped to markets
outside the region. Furthermore, the increasing value of
blueberry plants implies that any damage to the commercial
blueberry industry has financial implications for
growers and shippers. Summaries included in this report
help in accurate assessment of potential economic losses
from damages to blueberry plants and the feasibility of
programs protecting the value represented by orchards.

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Status and Revision History
Published on Jul 13, 2004
Removed as of Feb 2, 2009
Reviewed on Apr 11, 2013