Skip to content

Calendar | County Offices | Contact Us | Publications College of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences | College of Family & Consumer Sciences

Publications on Water

38 publications were found.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Irrigation (C 1027-12)

    This publication describes irrigation methods suitable for community or school gardens, including overhead sprinklers, hand watering and drip irrigation. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Sources of Water for the Garden (C 1027-11)

    This publication discusses the advantages and disadvantages of various sources of water for a community or school garden, including municipal water, rivers or creeks, ponds, wells and rainwater. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Conservation and Best Management Practices in Georgia: Implementing, Funding and Assistance (B 1335)

    Best Management Practices (BMPs) can be described as management and/or structural practices that are designed to reduce pollutants and erosion while increasing the quality of all life. The BMP concept deals specifically with nonpoint source pollution, such as runoff from agricultural fields, forest areas or urban areas. Best management practices are also voluntary in nature. Individual practices and applications can vary widely from field to field. Best management practices are typically used in agricultural areas, and forest and urban settings. Published on Jun 29, 2014.

  • Conserving Water in the Vegetable Garden (C 964)

    All vegetables, especially tomatoes, like an even supply of water throughout the growing season, and will often develop problems if their water supply fluctuates. If watering restrictions or bans are imposed, water conservation becomes a critical issue. Published on Apr 30, 2015.

  • Environmental Water Quality Series: Bacterial Source Tracking (BST) (B 1242-7)

    Fecal contamination of water impacts many regions of the U.S. and may carry risks to human health. When a water body fails to meet water quality standards for fecal bacteria, the Federal Clean Water Act requires a Total Maximum Daily Load analysis to establish how many bacteria are in the water, the sources of bacteria and whether the contamination varies seasonally. If all the point sources of contamination are acknowledged and there is still a bacterial problem, it may be time to try additional source identification tools, such as Bacterial Source Tracking. Published on Jun 29, 2014.

  • Environmental Water Quality Series: Drinking Water Protection in Georgia (B 1242-5)

    Drinking water sources in Georgia (surface and ground water) can be contaminated by landfills and dumps, leaky septic tanks, urban runoff, industry and agricultural operations. The state of Georgia has implemented two programs designed to identify potential sources of pollution and protect drinking water sources. Published on Jun 29, 2014.

  • Environmental Water Quality Series: Georgia's Water Quality Standards (B 1242-3)

    The Environmental Protection Division (GAEPD) of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GADNR) is responsible for setting and enforcing water quality standards. The goals of establishing these standards are to “provide enhancement of water quality and prevention of pollution; to protect the public health or welfare in accordance with the public interest for drinking water supplies, conservation of fish, wildlife, and other beneficial aquatic life, and agricultural, industrial, recreational, and other reasonable and necessary uses and to maintain and improve the biological integrity of the waters of the State.” This publication contains comprehensive information about Georgia's water quality standards and what the public should know about bodies of water that do not meet these standards. Published on Apr 30, 2015.

  • Environmental Water Quality Series: On-Site Wastewater Management Systems and Their Environmental Impact (B 1242-4)

    On-site wastewater treatment systems provide treatment and ultimate dispersal of wastewater from homes and small businesses. They usually consist of a septic tank, a drain field and the underlying soil. When properly designed, installed and maintained, they are an environmentally benign method to manage household wastewater. Published on Jun 29, 2014.

  • Environmental Water Quality Series: Total Maximum Daily Loads in Georgia (B 1242-2)

    A total maximum daily load (TMDL) is a calculation of the maximum amount of a pollutant that a water body can receive and still meet water quality standards. This publication contains comprehensive information about total maximum daily loads in Georgia, including their importance and how to establish an implementation plan. Published on Apr 30, 2015.

  • Environmental Water Quality Series: Urban Storm Water Management in Georgia (B 1242-6)

    Storm water is the runoff from land and impervious areas such as paved streets, parking lots and building rooftops during rain events. It often contains pollutants such as nutrients, bacteria, sediment and metals that could adversely affect water quality. Published on Jun 29, 2014.

  • Environmental Water Quality Series: Watershed Assessment in Georgia (B 1242-1)

    Watershed assessment is the measurement and use of chemical, physical and biological properties to determine the current health of streams. It also can include the use of predictive modeling of watershed conditions and suggests management practices that will maintain and improve the health of a watershed. This publication provides information on the components of a watershed assessment and how to implement these plans. Published on Apr 30, 2015.

  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Management Assessment (B 1276)

    The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establish a formal companywide water conservation plan. Implementation of this plan will facilitate more efficient use of resources and impart significant savings in water use, fertilizer and pesticides. This publication will help you take a candid look at how you approach water management. Published on Jan 31, 2017.

  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Quality Assessment (B 1277)

    The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establish a formal companywide water conservation plan. Implementation of this plan will facilitate more efficient use of resources and impart significant savings in water use, fertilizer and pesticides. This publication will help you determine your water quality and help you develop a management plan to monitor your water quality. Published on Jan 31, 2017.

  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Recycling and Water Reuse Assessment (B 1278)

    The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establish a formal company-wide water conservation plan. Implementation of this plan will facilitate more efficient use of resources and impart significant savings in water use, fertilizer and pesticides. This publication will help you assess the feasibility of water reclamation and recycling in your operation. Published on Jan 31, 2017.

  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Source Use and Expansion Assessment (B 1274)

    The Greenhouse*A*Syst publication Series has been developed to assist greenhouse owners with the task of assessing three management issues: Water management, Environmental Risk and Business Profitability. This publication will also help you establish a water conservation document you may find useful if and when state or local water authorities develop policies or implement water restrictions. Most water authorities are favorably impressed with businesses that have developed water conservation plans. Published on Jan 31, 2017.

  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Use Regulation, Legislative Awareness and Company Water Policy Assessment (B 1279)

    The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establish a formal company-wide water conservation plan.
    Implementation of this plan will facilitate more efficient use of resources and impart significant savings in water use, fertilizer and pesticides. This section will help you develop a plan to
    conserve water resources and establish a company policy. It will also ask you to become more aware and involved in local water use legislation. By completing this section, you will reduce the risk of being caught off-guard by water shortages due to legislative and social issues in your community. Published on Jan 31, 2017.

  • Household Water Quality Series: Home Water Quality and Treatment (C 858-3)

    The quality of your water supply can have both an immediate and a prolonged effect on the health of your household. Many Americans, especially those dependent upon well water, assume that their water is safe and healthy. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. This publication contains basic information about home water quality and treatment. Published on Sep 30, 2016.

  • Household Water Quality Series: Testing for Water Quality (C 858-2)

    The quality and safety of drinking water is of great concern to many Americans today because of an increased interest in health and environmental quality. This new focus on water quality has led many Americans to consider testing their water. This publication is intended to help you understand water testing and to identify the tests needed. Published on Sep 30, 2016.

  • Irrigation Water Quality for Agriculture (B 1448)

    With growing demands for potable (suitable for drinking) water (due to population increase) and expanding irrigated acreage, there is an increased pressure on irrigated farms to consider using nonpotable alternatives. However, low quality irrigation water can adversely affect soil physical conditions and crop production.

    This publication provides in-depth information on the following aspects of agricultural irrigation water quality:
    -Importance of irrigation water quality
    -Major attributes of irrigation water quality
    -Common units used
    -Salts content
    -Toxicity and their sources
    -Bacteria in water sources Published on Aug 30, 2015.

  • Make Every Drop Count: Managing a Water-Wise Landscape (C 895-4)

    Water-wise landscapes not only save water, they save time by requiring less routine care than most traditional landscapes. This publication offers guidelines to help you achieve these goals and conserve water when managing your landscape. Published on Jun 29, 2014.

  • Make Every Drop Count: Proper Planting Results in Healthy, Water-Efficient Plants (C 895-3)

    Planting ornamental plants correctly increases their survivability and performance in the landscape, and it helps them develop a vigorous, healthy root system that increases their drought tolerance during periods of limited rainfall. This pubication provides research-based guidelines for proper planting. Published on Jun 29, 2014.

  • Make Every Drop Count: Xeriscape - Seven Steps to a Water-Wise Landscape (C 895-1)

    A landscape designed, installed and managed according to Xeriscaping's seven steps uses up to 50% less water than a traditional landscape. And, a well-designed water-wise is just as attractive as a traditional landscape. Published on Jun 29, 2014.

  • Microalgae Utilization in Wastewater Treatment (B 1419)

    Low-energy input systems that utilize microalgae and the natural biological process of photosynthesis can drive efficient wastewater treatment systems. This publication describes the use of microalgae in wastewater treatment. Published on Apr 30, 2017.

  • Protecting Georgia's Surface Water Resources cover image Protecting Georgia's Surface Water Resources (B 1217)

    Since only a small amount of water is available for human use, this publication was written to provide a broad-based discussion of how to protect our surface water resources. Published on Jun 30, 2014.

  • Rain Gardens in Home Landscapes (EB 101)

    This publication includes three parts. Part 1 discusses stormwater as a pollution source for streams and water bodies, and provides a background on why rain gardens in our landscapes have great environmental value. Part 2 includes a thorough definition of rain gardens and their purpose, and gives step-by-step instructions on how to design a rain garden for a specific site. Part 3 discusses appropriate plants to use in rain gardens. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Rainwater Harvesting for System Designers and Contractors (B 1372)

    With recent droughts and increased emphasis on water conservation, rainwater harvesting (RWH) has become an important alternative source for outdoor irrigation. RWH is the collection of runoff from roofs during a rainfall event. The water is conveyed through a gutter
    system, filtered and stored in a tank for later use. In Georgia, non-potable harvested rainwater can be an alternative water supply for uses such as washing vehicles, landscape irrigation, livestock and wildlife watering, cooling towers and toilet flushing. Published on Jun 29, 2014.

  • The 2010 Georgia Water Stewardship Act (C 995)

    The Water Stewardship Act is intended to demonstrate Georgia’s deep commitment to the conservation of critical freshwater supplies. This publication provides an overview of the provisions and obligations for local governments, public systems and state agencies. Published on Jun 30, 2014.

  • The 2010 Georgia Water Stewardship Act: Farm Use Water Withdrawal Permits (C 994)

    The Water Stewardship Act is intended to demonstrate Georgia’s deep commitment to the conservation of critical freshwater supplies. This publication provides an overview of the major provisions affecting Georgia farmers and their use of the state’s most precious resource: WATER. Published on Jun 30, 2014.

  • Understanding Laboratory Wastewater Tests: I. ORGANICS (BOD, COD, TOC, O&G) cover image Understanding Laboratory Wastewater Tests: I. ORGANICS (BOD, COD, TOC, O&G) (C 992)

    For most people a complete understanding of the standard methods required to accurately complete critical wastewater analytical tests is not necessary. However, a fundamental understanding of the theory behind and working knowledge of the basic procedures used for each test, and the answers to commonly asked questions about each test can be a valuable tool for anyone involved in generating, monitoring, treating or discharging process wastewater. Published on Jul 31, 2016.

  • Understanding Wastewater Treatment Systems (EB 100)

    Many Georgia communities are wrestling with wastewater disposal issues. The choices a community makes may affect its growth and environmental quality. This PowerPoint presentation presents the basics of wastewater treatment systems so that community leaders can make better-informed choices. Published on Jun 30, 2014.

  • Understanding Your Water Bill (C 972)

    Educating yourself on the basics of your utility’s rates and rate structure, you can determine how your water bill is calculated, double check to make sure you are being charged the correct amount, and make the most cost-effective decisions for reducing your bill through water conservation. Published on Jun 29, 2014.

  • Water Meters as a Water Management Tool on Georgia Farms (B 1296)

    In 2004, the Georgia General Assembly passed and the governor signed House Bill 579, which required all permitted irrigation withdrawals in Georgia to be metered by 2009, depending on available funds. Farmers are continually trying to manage their irrigation systems to increase yields and improve the quality of food and fiber. Some management examples include end gun shut-offs (repaired or installed), uniformity tests, installing new sprinkler packages and improved irrigation methods. Each of these methods help improve the system, reduce costs and distribute more of the pumped water to the growing crop. The agricultural water meter also can be used for improved yields while conserving water. Published on Apr 30, 2015.

  • Water-Wise Landscape Guide for the Georgia Piedmont (B 1444)

    Do you want a landscape that is beautiful, saves you time, effort and money and uses less water? If you do, a water-wise landscape is for you. Water-wise landscapes are designed, organized, and maintained by practices that use water strategically and wisely. Follow the seven basic steps outlined in this guide to create a beautiful water-wise yard or home garden. Published on Jul 2, 2015.

Unavailable Publications

The following publications are under review and are not currently available. Contact the author(s) or publications editors for more information.