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Publications on Turfgrass

40 publications were found.

  • Abiotic Injuries and Disorders of Turfgrasses in Georgia (B 1258)

    Turfgrass stands can be injured and damaged by biotic (living) and abiotic (non-living) agents. Most abiotic diseases cause generalized symptoms such as wilting, yellowing, thinning and the development of smaller than normal grass blades, limited root growth or slow growth. Based solely on symptoms, however, determining whether the condition is caused by a biotic or an abiotic agent can be challenging. In many cases, a proper diagnosis of abiotic diseases requires thorough examination of the site, knowledge of relevant past and present environmental conditions, in-depth knowledge of plant species biology, site management history, and an orderly series of tests to determine possible causes. Published on Jan 31, 2017.

  • Annual Bluegrass Control Programs for Georgia Lawns (B 1463)

    Annual bluegrass (Poa annua) is the most problematic winter weed of lawns in Georgia. Plants have a light green color, coarse leaf texture, and produce unsightly seedheads. Annual bluegrass germinates in fall, overwinters in a vegetative state, and resumes active growth in spring. Competitive growth of populations causes stand thinning of desirable turfgrasses that may predispose lawns to invasion by summer annual weeds, such as crabgrass (Digitaria spp.). Annual bluegrass typically dies out by May in Georgia, but cool temperatures in spring and regular irrigation may extend survival of populations into early summer.

    Annual bluegrass is the most problematic winter weed of lawns in Georgia. Turf managers have experienced difficulty controlling annual bluegrass due to the spread of biotypes with resistance to pre- and post-emergence herbicides. This publication covers annual bluegrass identification, establishment, and cultural control for lawns. The development, detection, and control of herbicide-resistant annual bluegrass is also discussed. Published on Nov 30, 2016.

  • Bermudagrass in Georgia (B 911)

    Bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.) is an important warm-season, perennial, sod-forming forage grass in Georgia and throughout the Southeast. Bermudagrass is productive from spring until fall and is well-suited for grazing or hay production. Several varieties of bermudagrass are used in Georgia, ranging from common bermudagrass to the high-yielding, good quality hybrid bermudagrasses. The best variety to use depends on your location in the state and the intended use. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Centipedegrass Decline (C 1003)

    Centipedegrass is ideal for the homeowner who wants a lawn that needs little care. It can be established by either seed or vegetative parts and does not require much fertilizer. Compared to other lawn grasses, it is moderately resistant to insects and diseases. Although centipedegrass is a relatively low maintenance grass, proper management is still required. Published on Jul 15, 2014.

  • Controlling Crabgrass and Goosegrass with Resistance to Sethoxydim and other ACCase-Inhibitors in Georgia Turf (B 1462)

    Sethoxydim has been widely used for grassy weed control in centipedegrass lawns, roadsides, and sod farms. Decades of exclusive sethoxydim use in Georgia have led to the emergence of ACCase-resistant goosegrass and southern crabgrass in turf. This publication covers the development, detection, and control of ACCase-resistance crabgrass and goosegrass for professional turfgrass managers. Published on Nov 30, 2016.

  • Controlling Moss and Algae in Turf (C 823)

    Occasionally, turfgrass areas begin to thin out and moss and algae start to form. These primitive plants develop because conditions for growing dense, healthy turf have declined. This publication gives you preventive practices and chemical suppression tips for controlling moss and algae in turf. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Crabgrass Control in Georgia Hayfields cover image Crabgrass Control in Georgia Hayfields (C 1085)

    Crabgrass (Digitaria spp.) is the most problematic summer annual weed in Georgia hayfields. This publication summarizes the growth and identification of this weed. Cultural and chemical control options are also presented for various species managed for hay production. Published on Jun 30, 2016.

  • Designing, Constructing and Maintaining Bermudagrass Sports Fields cover image Designing, Constructing and Maintaining Bermudagrass Sports Fields (B 1292)

    This for-sale publication describes everything you need to know about designing, constructing and maintaining bermudagrass sports fields. It is available for purchase here: http://www.caes.uga.edu/publications/for_sale.cfm Published on Aug 30, 2014.

  • Dollar Spot of Turfgrasses in Georgia: Identification and Control cover image Dollar Spot of Turfgrasses in Georgia: Identification and Control (C 1091)

    Dollar spot is an ever-present turfgrass disease that affects all warm and cool season grasses in the state of Georgia. The publication contains important information on the biology of the causal agent, detail description of the disease symptoms (aided by high quality-detailed pictures), relevant up-to-date information on conditions favoring the disease, as well as cultural, genetic and chemical methods of control. The publication is intended for turfgrass professionals, consultants, county faculty, homeowners and general public. Published on Jul 31, 2016.

  • Foxtail Identification and Control in Georgia Pastures and Hayfields (B 1464)

    Foxtails (Setaria spp.) are invasive weeds in pastures and hayfields. The competitive growth of foxtails with pasture specie causes stand thinning and reductions in hay yields. Foxtails may be grazed in spring prior to inflorescence development. However, the production of seedheads is concerning in summer due to the sharp awns that can damage the gums of livestock. Hayfield growers are also concerned about the economic impact of foxtails on yield and hay quality. This publication discusses the identification of foxtail species along with cultural and chemical control options. Published on Nov 30, 2016.

  • Georgia Green*A*Syst: Environmental Checklist for Nurseries, Greenhouses and Turfgrass Producers (B 1366)

    Georgia's nurseries, greenhouses and turfgrass businesses are major contributors to Georgia's growing economy, to the beauty of Georgia homes and businesses, and to a better quality of life. When used appropriately, the products and services provided by these businesses enhance the environment of their customers. Thus, it only makes sense that these businesses should use management practices that are not damaging to natural resources and the environment. This publication is one tool that green industry companies can use to evaluate their management practices and design strategies for environmental compliance and pollution prevention. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Grasscycling: Let the Clippings Fall Where They May (C 1031)

    Grasscycling is the natural recycling of grass clippings by leaving them on the lawn after mowing. Grasscycling saves time, effort and, when done properly, is good for the environment and health of the grass. This publication describes the process of grasscycling, a practical and environmentally responsible way of recycling grass clippings in the landscape. Published on Apr 30, 2017.

  • Gray Leaf Spot in Georgia Turfgrass: Identification and Control (C 1116)

    In the state of Georgia, gray leaf spot (GLS) primarily affects St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum) and is particularly chronic and damaging in the coastal area of the state. This publication contains important information on the biology of the causal agent, detailed description of the disease symptoms (aided by high-quality, detailed pictures), relevant up-to-date information on conditions favoring the disease, as well as cultural, genetic, and chemical methods of control. The publication is intended for turfgrass professionals, consultants, county faculty, homeowners, and the general public. Published on Jun 30, 2017.

  • Identification and Control of Rhizoctonia Large Patch in Georgia cover image Identification and Control of Rhizoctonia Large Patch in Georgia (C 1088)

    Rhizoctonia large patch is the most common and severe warm season grass disease in Georgia and the United States as a whole. This publication contains important information on the biology of the causal agent; detailed descriptions of disease symptoms aided by high quality-detailed pictures; relevant, up-to-date information on conditions favoring the disease; and the cultural, genetic, and chemical methods of control. The content is intended for turfgrass
    professionals, consultants, county faculty, homeowners and general public. Published on Jul 31, 2016.

  • Identification and Control of Spring Dead Spot in Georgia (C 1012)

    Spring dead spot (SDS) is a persistent and destructive disease of bermudagrass (Cynodon sp.) in Georgia. The disease can be problematic on lawns, landscapes, golf courses (bermudagrass greens, tees and fairways) and sports fields. The disease is particularly prevalent and damaging in north Georgia, especially in the Piedmont region. However, SDS can be observed throughout the state after harsh winters and in areas where bermudagrass has been exposed to freezing temperatures for extended periods of time. The disease has also been observed in zoysiagrass, although less frequently. This publication explains how to identify and control Spring Dead Spot in lawns in Georgia. Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Lespedeza Identification and Control in Turfgrass (B 1395)

    This publication describes ways to identify and control Lespedeza in turfgrass, including cultural control methods, preemergence herbicides and postemergence herbicides. Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Mole Crickets in Turf (C 918)

    Mole crickets are serious pests of Georgia turf. Estimates of mole cricket losses in commercial, recreational and residential sod now exceed $20 million annually. Weather and soil conditions in Georgia’s Coastal Plain region are ideal for mole crickets, and damage continues to increase. Published on Jul 14, 2014.

  • Novel Endophyte-Infected Tall Fescue (C 861)

    This publication outlines plant persistence and animal performance characteristics of novel endophyte-infected tall fescue and provides recommended pasture renovation practices. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Professional Grounds Management Calendar (C 802)

    This publication is a monthly guide for professional managers of commercial, recreational, municipal, institutional or private grounds in Georgia. Published on Feb 28, 2016.

  • Spanish Series: Control de Bermuda en Céspedes Residenciales del Sudeste de los EEUU (B 1393-SP)

    La bermuda es una planta perenne de estación cálida ampliamente utilizada para su uso como césped en el sudeste de los Estados Unidos.

    [Although improved common (Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.) and hybrid bermudagrasses (Cynodon dactylon x C. transvaalensis Burtt-Davy) have desirable qualities as turfgrasses for heat, drought and wear tolerance, bermudagrass is a problematic weed when grown in mixed stands with other turf species. Selective control of bermudagrass is difficult but often warranted in order to maintain acceptable quality of the desired turfgrass species. This publication describes bermudagrass control methods for Southern lawns.] Published on Jul 14, 2014.

  • Spanish Series: Daños Abioticos y Anomalias de Céspedes en Georgia (B 1258-SP)

    Los céspedes pueden ser atacados por agentes bióticos (vivientes) y abióticos (no-vivientes). Los agentes bióticos incluyen patógenos (hongos, bacterias, virus, citoplasma etc) y plagas como nematodos, insectos, ácaros, moluscos y vertebrados (roedores, pájaros etc.). Los factores abióticos incluyen: condiciones climáticas como las temperaturas extremas, el exceso o deficiencia de agua, luz o nutrientes, suelo compacto, sequía, estancamiento de agua y/o prácticas de cultivo adversas. Estos factores pueden ser el resultado de una interacción que ha existido por un periodo largo de tiempo entre la planta y uno o más factores como la falta de espacio para un crecimiento radicular óptimo, la presencia de niveles crónicos de contaminantes del aire o agua.

    [Turfgrass stands can be injured and damaged by biotic (living) and abiotic (non-living) agents. Most abiotic diseases cause generalized symptoms such as wilting, yellowing, thinning and the development of smaller than normal grass blades, limited root growth or slow growth. Based solely on symptoms, however, determining whether the condition is caused by a biotic or an abiotic agent can be challenging. In many cases, a proper diagnosis of abiotic diseases requires thorough examination of the site, knowledge of relevant past and present environmental conditions, in-depth knowledge of plant species biology, site management history, and an orderly series of tests to determine possible causes.] Published on Jan 31, 2017.

  • Spanish Series: Enfermedades de los Céspedes en Georgia: Identificación y Control (B 1233-SP)

    Esta publicación es una guía completa para la identificación y control de enfermedades de los céspedes en Georgia. Enfermedades incluyen: mancha "dólar"; anillos de hada; pudrición radicular "toma-todo"; Mancha parda/Mancha larga por Rhizoctonia Royas; Mancha foliar o decaimiento por Curvularia; quemazón o mancha foliar gris; antracnosis; hongos gelatinosos; y pudrición radicular por Pythium/quemazón por Pythium. La publicación también incluye una guía sistemática para el diagnóstico de enfermedades de céspedes; un clave simplificada para la identificación de enfermedades de céspedes; y el calendario de enfermedades de céspedes en Georgia.

    [This publication is a comprehensive guide to identifying and controlling turfgrass diseases in Georgia. Diseases include: dollar spot, fairy rings, take-all root rot, brown patch/large patch, rust, leaf spot/melting out, gray leaf spot, anthracnose, slime mold, and pythium root rot/pythium blight. The publication also includes a systematic approach to diagnosis of turfgrass diseases, a simplified turfgrass disease identification key, and the Georgia turfgrass disease calendar.] Published on Jan 31, 2017.

  • Spanish Series: Identificación y Control de Lespedeza en Céspedes (B 1395-SP)

    La lespedeza común (Kummerowia striata (Thunb.) Schind syn. Lespedeza striata) es una leguminosa anual de verano sin organización en sus ramificaciones, que es una maleza problemática en céspedes de jardines residenciales así como en otras áreas de césped.

    [Common lespedeza (Kummerowia striata (Thunb.) Schind syn. Lespedeza striata) is a freely branched, summer annual legume that is a problematic weed in lawns and other turf areas. This publication describes ways to identify and control Lespedeza in turfgrass, including cultural control methods, preemergence herbicides and postemergence herbicides.] Published on Jul 14, 2014.

  • Take-All Root Rot of Warm-Season Grasses (C 1102)

    Take-all root rot (TARR) has emerged as a destructive disease in central, south and coastal Georgia. TARR affects all warm-season turfgrasses in Georgia, but it is more common and severe in St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum).

    This publication contains important information on the biology of the causal agent, detailed descriptions of the disease symptoms (aided by high-quality, detailed pictures), relevant up-to-date information on conditions favoring the disease, and cultural, genetic and chemical methods of control. This publication is intended for turfgrass professionals, consultants, county faculty, homeowners, and general public. Published on Oct 31, 2016.

  • The Management and Use of Bahiagrass (B 1362)

    Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) is a long-lived, perennial warm season grass that is grown extensively in the southeastern United States. It is most commonly used as a pasture species, but can be used for hay production, erosion control, and wildlife habitat. Bahiagrass can also be used in "sod-based rotation" sequences that have been found to suppress pest problems (nematode and disease issues) in crops such as peanuts. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Turfgrass Diseases in Georgia: Identification and Control (B 1233)

    This publication is a comprehensive guide to identifying and controlling turfgrass diseases in Georgia. Published on Jan 31, 2017.

  • Turfgrass Diseases: Quick Reference Guide (C 891)

    Causal agent, susceptible turfgrasses, conditions promoting disease, symptoms and control of brown patch, dollar spot, Pythium, Helminthosporium leaf spot, fading out, gray leaf spot, fairy ring, take-all root rot, rust, slime mold and nematodes. Published on Apr 30, 2015.

  • Turfgrass Fertility Series: Turfgrass Fertility: Soil Texture, Organic Matter, Aeration, and pH (C 1058-1)

    Successful lawn care requires a basic understanding of soil properties. A healthy plant starts with healthy soil. Soil is a complex relationship of soil minerals, organic matter, soil inhabiting organisms, and plants along with water and air. Understanding when and how to aerate the soil and understanding what pH is and how it affects plant health is essential for turfgrass health. This publication aims to help homeowners and landscape professionals improve soil fertility through the techniques discussed. Published on Nov 7, 2014.

  • Turfgrass Field Day Series: 2016 Turfgrass Research Field Day Guide (AP 117-1)

    This is a biennial publication containing the proceedings of the turfgrass research field day carried out at the UGA Griffin Campus every other year. The guide provides professionals with continuous, real time access to the latest up-to-date information about turfgrass research studies, products, and turfgrass Extension activities, programs, and outreach.

    Topics will include, but are not limited to, crop and soil science, agronomy, weed science, plant pathology, entomology, economics, tissue culture, urban agriculture, irrigation, and student posters. Published on Oct 31, 2096.

  • Turfgrass Pest Control Recommendations for Professionals (B 984)

    This publication includes recommendations and current guidelines for turfgrass pest control methods and materials in Georgia, as well as a turfgrass management calendar. Published on Apr 30, 2017.

  • Virginia Buttonweed Identification and Control in Turfgrass (B 1397)

    This publication discusses ways to identify and control Virginia buttonweed, a troublesome broadleaf weed in turfgrasses throughout the Southeast. Published on Sep 30, 2016.

  • Weeds of Southern Turfgrasses cover image Weeds of Southern Turfgrasses (SB 31)

    This is a guide for identification of weeds in the southern United States that will be a valuable resource for golf course superintendents, lawn care companies, roadside managers, sod growers, recreational facility managers, chemical company representatives, Extension agents, vocational agricultural teachers and turfgrass students. The book was developed specifically for turfgrass managers; however, it will be useful to anyone interested in identifying weeds of Southern turfgrasses. Published on Oct 31, 2015.

  • White Grub Pests of Turfgrass (C 940)

    White grubs are the larvae of scarab beetles. All are C-shaped, white to dirty white in color, with a brownish head and legs. Published on Jul 14, 2014.

Unavailable Publications

The following publications are under review and are not currently available. Contact the author(s) or publications editors for more information.