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Publications on Ornamental Horticulture

39 publications were found.

  • 2006 Georgia Gold Medal Winners (C 908)

    Each year a group of Green Industry Professionals from throughout Georgia gather to select a slate of outstanding ornamental plants in five categories: annual flower, herbaceous perennial, vine, shrub and tree. Only one plant in each category can earn the Gold Medal Award for outstanding performance. Published on Feb 28, 2016.

  • 2009 Georgia Gold Medal Winners (C 908-2)

    Each year, a group of Green Industry and academic professionals from Georgia convene to select outstanding ornamental plants in five categories: annual flower, herbaceous perennial, vine, shrub and tree. Published on Feb 28, 2016.

  • A Guide for Commercial Production of Vinca (B 1219)

    Vinca is a specialty ornamental crop with very distinct requirements. This bulletin will address those requirements and cover a typical production schedule and crop budget. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Alternatives to Petroleum-Based Containers for the Nursery Industry (B 1407)

    Beginning in the 1970s, container nursery production acreage rapidly increased such that container nursery production is now the dominant
    method of nursery production. As a standard in the industry, plastic
    nursery containers are lightweight, durable, familiar to growers, work well with automation, and can be reused or recycled. However, they are limited in their ability to be sustainably eco-friendly. This publication contains information about alternatives to petroleum-based containers for the nursery industry. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Alternatives to Synthetic Herbicides for Weed Management in Container Nurseries (B 1410)

    Weed management is one of the most critical and costly aspects for container nursery production. High irrigation and fertilization rates create a favorable environment for weed growth in addition to crop growth. Weeds can quickly out-compete the crop for light and other resources, reducing the rate and amount of crop growth as well as salability. Weed management in nursery production is most effectively achieved by preventative practices, primarily with the use of pre-emergent herbicides. However, there are valid reasons for managing weeds using alternatives to synthetic herbicides. Weed management alternatives to synthetic herbicides include sanitation, exclusion, prevention, hand weeding, mulching and use of cover crops, heat and non-synthetic herbicides. Only some of these alternative methods can be used to control weeds in containers, but all can be used to manage weeds around containers and in non-crop
    areas. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Classic City Garden Awards Series: 2016's Best New Plants from the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia (AP 116-4)

    New ornamentals have long been considered the lifeblood of the green industry. This publication contains recommendations for best-performing new annuals based on research conducted at the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia, showcasing the plants that were awarded the Classic City Award in 2016. Published on Feb 28, 2017.

  • Controlling Growth in Five Species of Herbaceous Foliage Plants (C 925)

    Plant growth retardants (PGRs) are commonly used in greenhouse production to obtain full and compact plants that are visually desirable to the consumer, as well as easier and less expensive to ship. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Conversion Tables, Formulas and Suggested Guidelines for Horticultural Use cover image Conversion Tables, Formulas and Suggested Guidelines for Horticultural Use (B 931)

    Pesticide and fertilizer recommendations are often made on a pounds per acre and tons per acre basis. While these may be applicable to field production of many crops, orchardists, nurserymen and greenhouse operators often must convert these recommendations to smaller areas, such as row feet, square feet, or even per tree or per pot. Thus pints, cups, ounces, tablespoons and teaspoons are the common units of measure. The conversion is frequently complicated by metric units of measure. This publication is designed to aid growers in making these calculations and conversions, and also provides other data useful in the management, planning and operation of horticultural enterprises. Published on Feb 28, 2016.

  • Deer-Tolerant Ornamental Plants (C 985)

    If deer are overabundant in your neighborhood, and deer herd reduction or management is not feasible, a good way to prevent deer browsing in landscapes is to plant ornamental plants that deer do not like to eat. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Diagnostics System for Crop History and Disorders in Greenhouses and Nurseries (B 1273)

    This diagnostic system is designed as a tool to assist growers, Extension specialists and county agents to diagnose problems with ornamental crops. The document consists of six major sections and five appendices. Each section is designed to supply information on various important aspects of the crop under scrutiny. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Digital Photography for Horticulture Professionals Series: Part 1: General Photography (B 1254-1)

    This publication series is designed to help you learn the basics of how to compose photos, overcome locations with less than optimal light conditions, and become acquainted with the terminology used in digital photography. They are also designed to teach you how to enhance and manipulate (edit) images and insert them into documents using a software program. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Digital Photography for Horticulture Professionals Series: Part 2: Digital Terminology and Essential Elements of Photo-Editing (B 1254-2)

    In Part I of this publication series, we discussed the basics of taking quality digital images from a photography standpoint, or the image capture. Now we will turn our attention to the terms used in digital imagery. Digital picture making can be described as a three-step process: image capture, image processing and image output. During each of these steps, understanding of digital terms and how they are applied is essential. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Foliage Products: An Opportunity for the Georgia Ornamental Industry (B 1262)

    The majority of the plants used for interior decoration are considered “foliage plants” because of the highly decorative value of their leaves. Most of them originated in tropical and subtropical areas of the world and are adapted to low light levels, making them a natural choice for interior environments. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Gardening in Containers (C 787)

    Growing plants in containers differs from growing plants in the ground. Poorly drained potting mixture can lead to root problems. Under conditions of excess moisture and poor aeration, roots become stressed and are easily invaded by root rotting fungi. Under these circumstances, plants fail to grow properly or even die.

    In addition to guidance on soil preparation, this bulletin provides information on selecting containers, planting and fertilizing container plants, a list of plants recommend for container gardens. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Georgia Green*A*Syst: Environmental Checklist for Nurseries, Greenhouses and Turfgrass Producers (B 1366)

    Georgia’s nurseries, greenhouses and turfgrass businesses are major contributors to Georgia’s growing economy, to the beauty of Georgia homes and businesses, and to a better quality of life. When used appropriately, the products and services provided by these businesses enhance the environment of their customers. Thus, it only makes sense that these businesses should use management practices that are not damaging to natural resources and the environment. This publication is one tool that green industry companies can use to evaluate their management practices and design strategies for environmental compliance and pollution prevention. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Management Assessment (B 1276)

    The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establish a formal companywide water conservation plan. Implementation of this plan will facilitate more efficient use of resources and impart significant savings in water use, fertilizer and pesticides. This publication will help you take a candid look at how you approach water management. Published on Jan 31, 2017.

  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Quality Assessment (B 1277)

    The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establish a formal companywide water conservation plan. Implementation of this plan will facilitate more efficient use of resources and impart significant savings in water use, fertilizer and pesticides. This publication will help you determine your water quality and help you develop a management plan to monitor your water quality. Published on Jan 31, 2017.

  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Recycling and Water Reuse Assessment (B 1278)

    The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establish a formal company-wide water conservation plan. Implementation of this plan will facilitate more efficient use of resources and impart significant savings in water use, fertilizer and pesticides. This publication will help you assess the feasibility of water reclamation and recycling in your operation. Published on Jan 31, 2017.

  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Use Regulation, Legislative Awareness and Company Water Policy Assessment (B 1279)

    The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establish a formal company-wide water conservation plan.
    Implementation of this plan will facilitate more efficient use of resources and impart significant savings in water use, fertilizer and pesticides. This section will help you develop a plan to
    conserve water resources and establish a company policy. It will also ask you to become more aware and involved in local water use legislation. By completing this section, you will reduce the risk of being caught off-guard by water shortages due to legislative and social issues in your community. Published on Jan 31, 2017.

  • Greenhouses: Heating, Cooling and Ventilation (B 792)

    This publication contains comprehensive, in-depth information about heating, cooling and ventilating greenhouses. Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Growing Bamboo in Georgia (B 1357)

    This booklet is written in an attempt to filter through much of the available information and make a simple, user-friendly information guide on growing bamboo in Georgia, which has a wide variety of soils and temperate zones. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Landscape Basics: Crop Rotation and Cultural Practices Help Reduce Diseases in Seasonal Color Beds (B 1423)

    Landscape professionals must consider many factors when choosing the right flowering annuals to plant for a particular location. Primary considerations include high visual impact, consistent bloom for color, foliage for texture and color, sun exposure, growth habit and low-water tolerance. Cost plays an important role as well. Many landscapers typically choose common annual ornamentals and tropical perennials marketed as annuals. Particular species and cultivars tend to be favored over others for a variety of reasons; these are the bread-and-butter plants, such as cool-season pansies and warm-season petunias. Because of this, staple plants tend to be planted year after year, often in the same bed – a recipe for disease build-up, pesticide applications, loss of plants, plant replacement, dissatisfied customers, and ultimately, lower profit margins. This publication explains how to effectively use crop rotation and cultural practices to reduce disease incidence in seasonal color beds. Published on Sep 30, 2016.

  • Landscape Basics: Success with Herbaceous Perennials (B 1424)

    Whether in a commercial installation or residential garden, perennial plants can be successfully
    used to offer more landscaping choices, distinguish your firm from the competition and create a niche for your landscape business. Perennial plants are complex, and it is best to contract or hire a professional landscape architect for the design phase and train knowledgeable staff in proper maintenance later on. This publication is intended to provide the basics of perennial plant biology, ideas on design and installation, and information on cultivation and maintenance of perennial beds. It should also serve as a quick guide for the most common and recommended perennials for Georgia. Common-sense tips from a professional landscaper's perspective are also included. Published on Sep 30, 2016.

  • Landscape Plants for Georgia cover image Landscape Plants for Georgia (B 625)

    This publication includes a list of good plants for Georgia organized into various sizes and groups. The design qualities of plants — their form, size, color and texture — are emphasized according to the principles and requirements of good landscape design and plant maintenance. Hardiness and disease and insect resistant qualities are also considered. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Liriope Culture in Georgia (B 755)

    Lirope, often called border grass, is one of the most useful and versatile ground cover and border plants that can be grown in Georgia. Several species and cultivars that grow well throughout the state are listed here, along with care and maintenance recommendations. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Managing Organic Refuse: Options for Green Industry Professionals (C 982)

    This publication explains some of the options available to Green Industry professionals for dealing with these organic materials. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Native Plants for Georgia Part II: Ferns (B 987-2)

    There are about 12,000 species of ferns in the world today. Most are found in the tropics. Currently, Georgia is home to 36 genera, 119 species and 12 hybrid ferns. The list is constantly expanding as new plants are found. To grow ferns successfully, it is important to match the site characteristics and growing environment with the native requirements of the fern species you intend to grow. Even if a fern is native to Georgia, it may not be native to the area of the state where you live. Published on Oct 31, 2015.

  • New Trial Tropical Container Gardens (B 1361)

    With increased urbanization, container gardens continue to enjoy popularity and brighten up patios and balconies. For many reasons, tropical plants have become a staple in container gardens traditionally filled with herbaceous annuals, bulbs, succulents, perennials and woody plants. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Nursery Crop Selection and Market Implications (B 1398)

    Each year, one of the first questions both seasoned and new nursery producers, managers and owners asks is, “What plants should be propagated and/or grown in the upcoming season(s)?” Answering this question requires a complex equation of inputs ranging from the type of nursery operation that exists to physical location and market trends. For this reason, the answer to this question varies for each person or business.

    This publication describes several important factors that must be considered to properly assess which ornamental crops should be grown and which market niches exist that may dictate crop selection. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Pampas Grass (C 983)

    Pampas grass is a large perennial grass native to Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Mature plants can reach 10 feet tall and 6 feet wide. In late summer, silvery-white plumes rise several feet above the foliage and make a bold, dramatic statement in the landscape. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Propagating Deciduous Fruit Plants Common to Georgia (B 818)

    Deciduous fruit plants common to Georgia must be propagated asexually because they do not come true to seed. This makes it necessary to reproduce the desired fruit plants by methods such as cuttings, runners, layering, budding or grafting. This publication discusses the common techniques used to asexually propagate fruit plants adapted to Georgia. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Rain Gardens in Home Landscapes (EB 101)

    This publication includes three parts. Part 1 discusses stormwater as a pollution source for streams and water bodies, and provides a background on why rain gardens in our landscapes have great environmental value. Part 2 includes a thorough definition of rain gardens and their purpose, and gives step-by-step instructions on how to design a rain garden for a specific site. Part 3 discusses appropriate plants to use in rain gardens. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Soil Preparation and Planting Procedures for Ornamental Plants in the Landscape (B 932)

    Proper planting is essential for healthy, vigorous growth of ornamental plants in the landscape. It assures rapid plant establishment by providing a favorable environment for the developing root system. This publication offers step-by-step guidelines that will help you achieve planting success. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Spanish Series: Enfermedades Más Comunes de Plantas Ornamentales en Georgia (B 1238-SP)

    Esta publicación describe algunas de las enfermedades más problemáticas en las plantas de ornato más usadas en el jardín. El material presentado aquí le ayudará a identificar estas enfermedades y encontrará las recomendaciones para su tratamiento. El conocimiento de estas enfermedades permitirá a los jardineros profesionales y amateurs a combatir estas enfermedades y tener plantas saludables y bellas.

    [This publication describes some of the most troublesome diseases of Georgia's landscape plants. The following material will help you identify these diseases and offers recommendations for treatment. Knowledge about the common diseases of Georgia landscape plants will allow professional and amateur growers alike to better fight plant diseases and produce healthy plants.] Published on May 30, 2015.

  • Success with Mixed Containers Using Perennial and Woody Plants (B 1418)

    This publication offers information on types of plants suitable for mixed containers, with an emphasis on perennial and woody species and cultivars, as well as aesthetic qualities, cultural conditions and placement within the container. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • The New and Improved Chaste Tree (C 1076)

    Chaste tree (genus Vitex) is an ornamental with many desirable qualities for the urban landscape. It is a deciduous shrub to small tree proffering violet flowers, which are a magnet for pollinators, fragrant foliage, and excellent drought and deer tolerance. It's not surprising that it has been touted as one of the best plants for Georgia gardens.

    There is always room for improvement on what nature provided, so the breeding team at the University of Georgia Department of Horticulture has spent years working to improve on this valuable ornamental, and they are ready to offer several great new plants: 'Daytona Heat Danica Pink,' 'Daytona Heat Dale White,' 'Daytona HeatTM Petty Blue,' 'Pink Pinnacles,' and 'Little Madame.' This publication highlights the features of these chaste trees. Published on Nov 24, 2015.

  • Tropical Plants Offer New Possibilities for Georgia Gardens (B 1272)

    The goals of these investigations were to achieve an aesthetically pleasing landscape while experimenting with mixing various plant habits, leaf textures and colors, and even flowers, and to raise consumer awareness, both at industry and public levels, of the alternative uses of tropical plants in the landscape. This publication presents plant performance data collected over a three-year period in trials from two different Georgia environments, a coastal area and a mid-state area. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Winter Protection of Ornamental Plants cover image Winter Protection of Ornamental Plants (C 872)

    Cold damage to ornamental plants can be a problem during the winter in the Georgia landscape. Regardless of where you live, recommended practices can maximize the chances that your prized landscape plants will survive the winter. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

Unavailable Publications

The following publications are under review and are not currently available. Contact the author(s) or publications editors for more information.