Skip to content

Calendar | County Offices | Contact Us | Publications College of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences | College of Family & Consumer Sciences

Publications on Landscaping

73 publications were found.

  • 2010 Georgia Gold Medal Winners (C 908-3)

    Each year, outstanding ornamental plants are chosen by an elite group of industry and academic professionals. The Georgia Gold Medal Award is given to only one plant in each of five categories: annual flower, herbaceous perennial, vine, shrub, and tree. Published on Feb 28, 2016.

  • Attracting Birds to Your Backyard (C 976)

    To attract and maintain a bird population, a habitat should provide (1) food, (2) shelter/nesting areas and (3) water. This publication describes several ways to attract birds to your backyard. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Best Management Practices in the Landscape (C 873)

    Research has shown that if you properly select, install and maintain ornamental plant, you greatly increase their survival and performance in the landscape. Following BMPs (Best Management Practices) not only conserve moisture in the landscape but will assure overall health and vigor of the ornamental plants. Published on Nov 30, 2016.

  • Care of Ornamental Plants in the Landscape (B 1065)

    Most established ornamental plants in the landscape require care to stay healthy and attractive. Regular fertilization, pruning, watering, mulching and pest control are all part of a good landscape management program. This publication provides guidelines for the care of established ornamental plants in the landscape. Low-maintenance alternatives to traditional cultural practices are discussed throughout the publication. Published on Feb 28, 2016.

  • Chainsaw Safety Tips cover image Chainsaw Safety Tips (B 1364)

    This publication discusses tips for purchasing the correct chainsaw for your needs and how to use it safely. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Classic City Garden Awards Series: 2016's Best New Plants from the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia (AP 116-4)

    New ornamentals have long been considered the lifeblood of the green industry. This publication contains recommendations for best-performing new annuals based on research conducted at the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia, showcasing the plants that were awarded the Classic City Award in 2016. Published on Feb 28, 2017.

  • Common Landscape Diseases in Georgia (B 1238)

    This publication describes some of the most troublesome diseases of Georgia's landscape plants. The following material will help you identify these diseases and offers recommendations for treatment. Knowledge about the common diseases of Georgia landscape plants will allow professional and amateur growers alike to better fight plant diseases and produce healthy plants. Published on May 30, 2015.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Extending the Crop Season: Unheated Spaces (C 1027-14)

    This publication describes common myths about cold protection and provides options for protecting plants from the cold in community and school gardens, including cold frames, row covers and hoop houses. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Garden Fencing (C 1027-9)

    This publication describes options for fencing a community or school garden, including fence types and materials. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Garden Sheds (C 1027-7)

    This publication provides information about storage sheds for community and school gardens, including local building codes, siting a shed, and alternatives to traditional sheds. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Irrigation (C 1027-12)

    This publication describes irrigation methods suitable for community or school gardens, including overhead sprinklers, hand watering and drip irrigation. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Less Expensive Sources of Plant Material, Amendments and Tools (C 1027-6)

    This publication offers advice on finding less expensive sources of plant material, amendments and tools for community and school gardens. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Planning an Edible Garden (C 1027-1)

    This publication describes three steps for planning a school garden: garden location, soil and terrain, and choosing crops. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Raised Bed Materials (C 1027-5)

    This publication describes the advantages and disadvantages of various materials used for building raised beds, including types of wood, composite materials, recycled materials, and kits. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Raised Beds vs. In-Ground Gardens (C 1027-3)

    This publication describes the advantages and disadvantages of raised bed and in-ground gardens and may be used as a guide when planning a community or school garden project. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Raised Garden Bed Dimensions (C 1027-4)

    This publication helps determine the ideal dimensions of raised beds for community and school gardens by focusing on three things: materials, slope and accessibility. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Siting a Garden (C 1027-2)

    This publication provides recommendations for properly siting a school or community garden, taking into account sunlight exposure, water availability, slope, garden access, tool storage, compost bins and other amenities. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Sources of Water for the Garden (C 1027-11)

    This publication discusses the advantages and disadvantages of various sources of water for a community or school garden, including municipal water, rivers or creeks, ponds, wells and rainwater. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Stocking the Toolshed: Hand Tools (C 1027-8)

    This publication describes the types and quantities of hand tools that work best for community and school gardens, including shovels, rakes, trowels, hand pruners, gloves, children's tools, and carts and wheelbarrows. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Weed Control (C 1027-13)

    This publication describes weed control methods that are appropriate for community and school gardens. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Composting: Recycling Landscape Trimmings (C 981)

    Citizens throughout Georgia are recycling newspaper, cans, glass and plastic in an effort to divert these materials from the waste stream. Another important part of waste reduction involves recycling leaves, lawn clippings, and tree and shrub trimmings instead of placing them curbside for the county or municipality to pick up. These landscape riches from Mother Nature can be easily recycled and turned into nutrient-rich organic matter right in your backyard through a process called composting. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Developing a WaterSmart Landscape (C 930)

    A water smart landscape is more than just water-efficient. It's a landscape that has been carefully designed, properly installed and managed to reduce pollution, improve conservation and ensure year-round beauty. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Dollar Spot of Turfgrasses in Georgia: Identification and Control cover image Dollar Spot of Turfgrasses in Georgia: Identification and Control (C 1091)

    Dollar spot is an ever-present turfgrass disease that affects all warm and cool season grasses in the state of Georgia. The publication contains important information on the biology of the causal agent, detail description of the disease symptoms (aided by high quality-detailed pictures), relevant up-to-date information on conditions favoring the disease, as well as cultural, genetic and chemical methods of control. The publication is intended for turfgrass professionals, consultants, county faculty, homeowners and general public. Published on Jul 31, 2016.

  • Effects of Low Temperature on Plants cover image Effects of Low Temperature on Plants (B 1467)

    Temperatures affects plant growth and distribution. This publication explains how low temperatures (chilling and freezing) affect plant growth in production greenhouses, nurseries, and landscapes. These three environments have different causes and effects, each requiring unique responses to avoid injury. This publication outlines different techniques that can be used to avoid cold injury to plants. Published on Jan 31, 2017.

  • Environmental Enhancement with Ornamental Plants: Butterfly Gardening (C 975)

    Butterfly populations can be greatly enhanced by devoting a portion of the landscape to butterfly habitat. In addition to their natural beauty, butterflies serve as valuable plant pollinators. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Environmentally Friendly Landscape Practices (C 967)

    With proper planning, planting and maintenance, a healthier landscape can be created with less expense, less work and less damage to the world around us. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Fall Gardening: A Collection of Information and Resources (AP 105)

    This publication is an annually-updated guide to fall gardening information and resources for Georgia. Topics include planting tall fescue lawns, soil bag flower beds, planting pansies like the pros, planting collards, turnips and cabbage, planting a home fruit orchard, mulching with leaves, gardening chores, cleaning and storing garden tools, treating for fire ants, and additional resources. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • Flowering Annuals for Georgia Gardens (B 954)

    Annuals are the mainstay color plant of many home gardens. They are also used in increasingly large numbers in commercial and municipal landscapes because they provide landscape color in a very short time with minimal investment. Properly cared for, many annuals will brighten the landscape continuously from spring until frost kills them in the fall. Published on Jan 31, 2015.

  • Georgia Master Gardener Handbook cover image Georgia Master Gardener Handbook (AP 106)

    The Georgia Master Gardener Handbook, 7th Edition, is the official reference text produced by the University of Georgia and developed for Master Gardener training. For more information about the Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteer Program, visit www.GAmastergardener.org.

    This book, published in 2011, is currently available at $75 per copy (including tax and shipping). Single copies (no certificate or badge included) may be purchased online with a credit card at www.caes.uga.edu/?tiny=043XMU. Delivery will be 7-14 business days from receipt of order. Please include a street address rather than a P.O. box. Sales of books and data are considered final. Materials returned due to damage in shipping will be replaced. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • Great Plants Under 20 Feet for Small Spaces (C 999)

    Well-chosen small trees and shrubs can provide privacy from your neighbors, separation from a road with heavy traffic or a screen to hide unattractive areas. By selecting plants that mature to a height of 20 feet or less, you can create a natural fence. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Hort Management: For Landscape Managers (B 1261)

    HORT Management is an allied program for estimating landscape management costs. This program assists the user in estimating labor, material and equipment costs on a particular job, a break-even price, and bid price on a job. Industry average data and time/task data is used throughout the program, such as the time it takes to mow 1,000 sq. ft. with a certain size mower and equipment cost per hour of operation. The user is encouraged to modify and tailor the program with his own data and costs. For more information, see http://www.hort.uga.edu/extension/programs/hortmanage.html Published on Dec 31, 2016.

  • Hort Scape: For Landscape Installers (B 1317)

    Hort Scape streamlines the bidding process once the user builds a coded database of plants, including common and botanical names, plant sizes, plant costs, and per plant installation costs. Then, using the bid estimator, the user inputs the plant codes and quantities for the plants used on a particularly job, and the associated information on each plant is brought over from the database to the estimator. Other sections of the estimator calculate costs of bed amendments, fertilizers, turfgrass installation, grading, watering, edging, pre-kill with herbicides, plant removal, and clean-up. All these costs are then transferred to a bid summary sheet which shows labor, material and equipment cost for each task performed. The bid summary shows direct job costs, bid price, break-even price, profit on the job and overhead recovery. For more information, see http://www.hort.uga.edu/extension/programs/hortmanage.html Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Insect Identification Guide for Southeastern Landscapes cover image Insect Identification Guide for Southeastern Landscapes (B 1409)

    This publication contains photos and descriptions to help identify pests in Southeastern landscapes. Beneficial and pest insects are both included. NOTE: This publication is designed with tabs and cutouts that are not necessarily apparent when printed on a home printer. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Irrigation for Lawns and Gardens (B 894)

    In order to maintain a lush, green lawn and productive garden, supplemental water in the form of irrigation is often needed during peak water use periods. Two basic types of irrigation are suitable for the home landscape: sprinkler irrigation and drip (or trickle) irrigation. This publication contains comprehensive information about irrigating lawns and gardens. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Landscape Basics: Color Theory (B 1396)

    This publication explores color relationships in the landscape, ways of seeing plants in terms of color, and various ways to use color successfully in plant selection and landscape design and composition. Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Landscape Basics: Crop Rotation and Cultural Practices Help Reduce Diseases in Seasonal Color Beds (B 1423)

    Landscape professionals must consider many factors when choosing the right flowering annuals to plant for a particular location. Primary considerations include high visual impact, consistent bloom for color, foliage for texture and color, sun exposure, growth habit and low-water tolerance. Cost plays an important role as well. Many landscapers typically choose common annual ornamentals and tropical perennials marketed as annuals. Particular species and cultivars tend to be favored over others for a variety of reasons; these are the bread-and-butter plants, such as cool-season pansies and warm-season petunias. Because of this, staple plants tend to be planted year after year, often in the same bed – a recipe for disease build-up, pesticide applications, loss of plants, plant replacement, dissatisfied customers, and ultimately, lower profit margins. This publication explains how to effectively use crop rotation and cultural practices to reduce disease incidence in seasonal color beds. Published on Sep 30, 2016.

  • Landscape Basics: Designing a Quality Control Program for Your Company (B 1420)

    Well-groomed landscapes are often a result of considerable effort by landscape companies. Employees make them happen with routine care and, above all, attention to detail. A quality landscape and the image employees present on the job speak highly of the professionalism of the firm. Quality control (QC) is everyone's responsibility and an essential part of a landscaper's job. This publication describes the basics of creating and implementing a successful quality control program for your landscaping company. Published on Feb 28, 2016.

  • Landscape Basics: Success with Herbaceous Perennials (B 1424)

    Whether in a commercial installation or residential garden, perennial plants can be successfully
    used to offer more landscaping choices, distinguish your firm from the competition and create a niche for your landscape business. Perennial plants are complex, and it is best to contract or hire a professional landscape architect for the design phase and train knowledgeable staff in proper maintenance later on. This publication is intended to provide the basics of perennial plant biology, ideas on design and installation, and information on cultivation and maintenance of perennial beds. It should also serve as a quick guide for the most common and recommended perennials for Georgia. Common-sense tips from a professional landscaper's perspective are also included. Published on Sep 30, 2016.

  • Landscape Design Series: Choosing a Landscape Design Professional (C 1032-1)

    The landscape is a very important aspect of a home. Having a beautiful, creative and functional landscape requires some understanding of design principles, plant materials and outdoor structural elements. A landscape installation can be very simple or extremely complicated. Designing irrigation systems, outdoor lighting, stone walls and patios requires skills that go beyond those of the average homeowner. When the job seems too big, it may be time to call in a professional. This publication provides guidelines and suggestions for finding a garden designer. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Landscape Design Series: Drawing a Landscape Plan - Site Analysis (C 1032-4)

    Designing a beautiful landscape for the home can be a very enjoyable and satisfying experience. With a little homework, a landscape plan is within reach of most homeowners. Before great ideas can become a plan, you must determine the limitations and assets of the site. This publication briefly describes how to create a site analysis for landscape design. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Landscape Design Series: Drawing a Landscape Plan, The Base Map (C 1032-3)

    Preparing a landscape plan can be an enjoyable and satisfying experience if you do a little homework and follow a few guidelines. A simple landscape base map can be drawn without a computer, special software or even expensive drafting supplies, and is the first step in developing a landscape plan. The base map is an accurate representation of the existing landscape, scaled to fit the paper, showing information such as house dimensions, distance to street, and the location of trees,
    woods, driveways and sidewalks, if these are already present in the landscape. This publication explains how to draw a base map for landscape planning. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Landscape Design Series: Working with a Garden Designer (C 1032-2)

    Designing a landscape is much like designing the interior of a house. Colors, patterns and textures must be arranged in a manner that is functional and suits the taste of the owner. The one major difference with landscape design is that most of the elements are living, providing seasonal change, forever growing taller and wider, and occasionally dying. An experienced garden designer has the ability to incorporate all this information into the design, but the homeowners must do their homework and be prepared to talk to the designer. This publication will help homeowners develop a plan for working with a landscape designer. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Landscape Plants for Georgia cover image Landscape Plants for Georgia (B 625)

    This publication includes a list of good plants for Georgia organized into various sizes and groups. The design qualities of plants—their form, size, color and texture—are emphasized according to the principles and requirements of good landscape design and plant maintenance. Hardiness and disease and insect resistant qualities are also considered. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Make Every Drop Count: Managing a Water-Wise Landscape (C 895-4)

    Water-wise landscapes not only save water, they save time by requiring less routine care than most traditional landscapes. This publication offers guidelines to help you achieve these goals and conserve water when managing your landscape. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Make Every Drop Count: Proper Planting Results in Healthy, Water-Efficient Plants (C 895-3)

    Planting ornamental plants correctly increases their survivability and performance in the landscape, and it helps them develop a vigorous, healthy root system that increases their drought tolerance during periods of limited rainfall. This pubication provides research-based guidelines for proper planting. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Make Every Drop Count: Xeriscape - Seven Steps to a Water-Wise Landscape (C 895-1)

    A landscape designed, installed and managed according to Xeriscaping's seven steps uses up to 50% less water than a traditional landscape. And, a well-designed water-wise is just as attractive as a traditional landscape. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Native Plants for Georgia Part IV: Grasses and Sedges (B 987-4)

    This publication describes and illustrates 48 grasses and 10 sedges native to Georgia. It is not the intent of the authors to
    describe all native grasses and sedges, but those that are most widespread or those having practical application for wildlife
    habitats, erosion control, restoration projects or landscape culture. A few of the plants are noted as being weedy or
    invasive and may not be appropriate for use in cultivated landscapes. Nonetheless, they are included to assist the reader in
    identifying them because they are abundant in the wild. Published on Feb 28, 2016.

  • New Native Little Bluestems cover image New Native Little Bluestems (C 1081)

    Little Bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) is a drought tolerant, low maintenance native plant. This ornamental, warm season perennial grass tolerates a wide range of soil conditions and is easily grown. Its purplish bronze blooms and vertical clusters of slender leaves make it a lovely addition to any landscape. It is cold hardy in Georgia, although it may suffer moderate damage in cold winters in the North Georgia mountains. Dr. Carol Robacker of the University of Georgia and Dr. Melanie Harrison of the United States Department of Agriculture have recently created new Little Bluestem cultivars with improved form, reduced height, and more intense red or blue foliage. Several of these desirable new plants are now available to the landscape industry and the public! Published on Jul 31, 2016.

  • Ornamental Plantings on Septic Drainfields (C 1030)

    Ornamental plantings can be attractive and beneficial options for the expanse of open ground designated for a septic drainfield. Properly chosen plants help manage moisture and nutrient levels in the soils around the drainfield, and can discourage activities that may cause site compaction and reduce the effectiveness of the system. The drawback is that poor plant choices can create costly maintenance issues, and any septic drainfield repair work could disturb planting areas that you value. By following a few simple guidelines, planting in these areas can be both pretty and practical. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Pampas Grass (C 983)

    Pampas grass is a large perennial grass native to Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Mature plants can reach 10 feet tall and 6 feet wide. In late summer, silvery-white plumes rise several feet above the foliage and make a bold, dramatic statement in the landscape. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Poisonous Plants in the Landscape (C 957)

    The purpose of this publication is to familiarize you with some of the common landscape plants in Georgia known to have poisonous properties when ingested. Published on Nov 30, 2015.

  • Professional Grounds Management Calendar (C 802)

    This publication is a monthly guide for professional managers of commercial, recreational, municipal, institutional or private grounds in Georgia. Published on Feb 28, 2016.

  • Rain Gardens in Home Landscapes (EB 101)

    This publication includes three parts. Part 1 discusses stormwater as a pollution source for streams and water bodies, and provides a background on why rain gardens in our landscapes have great environmental value. Part 2 includes a thorough definition of rain gardens and their purpose, and gives step-by-step instructions on how to design a rain garden for a specific site. Part 3 discusses appropriate plants to use in rain gardens. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Safety Checklists for New Landscape Employees (B 1415)

    These checklists can be used to introduce new landscape workers to safe work practices. They ensure that job safety training includes safety instruction. Included are sections on general safety precautions, equipment safety, lawn mower safety and pesticide safety. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Safety for Hispanic Landscape Workers cover image Safety for Hispanic Landscape Workers (B 1334)

    Hispanic workers predominate in Georgia's urban agriculture industry, comprising almost three-fourths of the workforce. Employers must ensure comprehension and safety compliance, address language barriers to create a safe workplace, use physical demonstrations, diagrams, bilingual materials and, if available, an interpreter. This publication covers general precautions, equipment safety, pesticide safety and other information that is necessary for keeping employees safe. It is also available in Spanish. Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Shade Trees for Georgia (C 1013)

    Shade trees are a staple of Southern landscapes and include a variety of species, forms and seasonal appeal. In the Southeastern U.S., shade trees are used most often to provide relief from the summer sun and heat. Additionally, shade trees can be utilized to channel summer breezes to desired locations, add monetary value to a property, define outdoor spaces, and improve landscape sustainability by reducing soil erosion, decreasing storm water flows, increasing rainwater infiltration and increasing wildlife habitat.The information in this publication will assist homeowners in making informed decisions when selecting fast growing shade trees for urban and suburban environments. Published on Jan 31, 2015.

  • Spanish Series: Control de Bermuda en Céspedes Residenciales del Sudeste de los EEUU (B 1393-SP)

    La bermuda es una planta perenne de estación cálida ampliamente utilizada para su uso como césped en el sudeste de los Estados Unidos.

    [Although improved common (Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.) and hybrid bermudagrasses (Cynodon dactylon x C. transvaalensis Burtt-Davy) have desirable qualities as turfgrasses for heat, drought and wear tolerance, bermudagrass is a problematic weed when grown in mixed stands with other turf species. Selective control of bermudagrass is difficult but often warranted in order to maintain acceptable quality of the desired turfgrass species. This publication describes bermudagrass control methods for Southern lawns.] Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Spanish Series: La Importancia de Preservar la Biodiversidad en el Paisaje y cómo Podemos Ayudar (B 1451-SP)

    Para preservar la biodiversidad en los paisajes urbanos, las plantas nativas necesitan ser proveídas de una forma que mantiene sus beneficios ecológicos. Al mismo tiempo, las plantas nativas necesitan ser atractivas para los consumidores y económicamente factibles de producir para los viveros. Actualmente hay una disponibilidad limitada de plantas ornamentales nativas que tanto ayudan a la ecología como parecen estéticamente agradables. El aumento de su uso en jardinería requiere satisfacer estas demandas diferentes. Este artículo explica la importancia de las plantas nativas y ofrece información sobre las asociaciones entre los científicos, la industria, y el público en la preservación de la biodiversidad y la salud ecológica los paisajes urbanos.

    [To preserve biodiversity in urban landscapes, native plants need to be included in a way that maintains their ecological benefits. At the same time, native plants need to be attractive to consumers and economically feasible for nurseries to produce. There is currently a limited availability of native ornamental plants that both help the ecology and appear aesthetically pleasing. Increasing their use in landscaping requires satisfying these different demands. This bulletin explains the role of native plants and outlines the partnerships among scientists, industry, and the public in preserving biodiversity and ecological health in the urban environment.] Published on Nov 30, 2015.

  • Seguridad para Trabajadores Hispanos de Jardineria cover image Spanish Series: Seguridad para Trabajadores Hispanos de Jardineria (B 1334-SP)

    Los hispanos representan la minoría más grande de los Estados Unidos con 42.7 millones de habitantes. Los trabajadores hispanos predominan en la industria de la agricultura urbana del estado de Georgia y conforman casi las tres/cuartas partes del total de obreros del estado. Los supervisores deben garantizar la comprensión e implementación de la seguridad laboral. Es imprescindible reconocer las barreras de comunicación para mantener un área de trabajo donde predomine y se haga efectiva la seguridad laboral. Use demostraciones, dibujos, materiales bilingues, y si es posible, un intérprete.

    [Hispanic workers predominate in Georgia's urban agriculture industry, comprising almost three-fourths of the workforce. Employers must ensure comprehension and safety compliance, address language barriers to create a safe workplace, use physical demonstrations, diagrams, bilingual materials and, if available, an interpreter. This publication covers general precautions, equipment safety, pesticide safety and other information that is necessary for keeping employees safe. It is also available in Spanish.] Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Success with Mixed Containers Using Perennial and Woody Plants (B 1418)

    This publication offers information on types of plants suitable for mixed containers, with an emphasis on perennial and woody species and cultivars, as well as aesthetic qualities, cultural conditions and placement within the container. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Success with Pansies in the Winter Landscape: A Guide for Landscape Professionals (B 1359)

    This publication provides guidelines for the planting and care of pansies to ensure success, including planting time, bed preparation, plant spacing, planting procedures, fertilization, freeze protection, and common insect and disease problems. Since seasonal color is a high-cost investment in the landscape, it is important to get the maximum return on your investment by following these planting and cultural guidelines. Published on Feb 28, 2016.

  • The Importance of Preserving Biodiversity in the Urban Landscape and How We Can Help (B 1451)

    To preserve biodiversity in urban landscapes, native plants need to be included in a way that maintains their ecological benefits. At the same time, native plants need to be attractive to consumers and economically feasible for nurseries to produce. There is currently a limited availability of native ornamental plants that both help the ecology and appear aesthetically pleasing. Increasing their use in landscaping requires satisfying these different demands.

    This bulletin explains the role of native plants and outlines the partnerships among scientists, industry, and the public in preserving biodiversity and ecological health in the urban environment. Published on Nov 30, 2015.

  • Think Outside the Boxwood: Alternative Plants for Gardens and Landscapes (C 1107)

    Since 2014, boxwood blight has been steadily spreading throughout Georgia landscapes and threatening large and economically important boxwood plantings. This publication provides alternative plants to replace boxwood in landscapes across Georgia. It offers updated information on new cultivars and cautions against use of plants on the GA-EPPC invasive plant list as well as species and cultivars affected by common pests and diseases. Published on Jan 19, 2017.

  • Tips for Saving Water in the Landscape (C 1010)

    Research has shown that a landscape that has been carefully planned and installed and properly managed will be healthier, less prone to insects and diseases, and will require less irrigation. Georgia's landscape and turf industry and UGA Cooperative Extension are urging citizens to implement inexpensive and easy-to-perform landscape management practices that decrease the need for irrigation and/or lead to greater efficiency of irrigation when it is needed. This publication provides tips about planning, planting and maintaining the landscape to save water. Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Turfgrass Fertility: Understanding Fertilizer Labels, Macronutrients, and Micronutrients cover image Turfgrass Fertility Series: Turfgrass Fertility: Understanding Fertilizer Labels, Macronutrients, and Micronutrients (C 1058-2)

    A regular fertilization program is important to maintain healthy, attractive turf and should include applying the correct analysis of fertilizer, using the correct amount, and fertilizing at the proper time. Turfgrasses require a number of nutrients for growth. Three of these—carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen—are rarely lacking because grasses get these elements from carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and water from the soil.

    The remaining eighteen essential elements are also obtained from the soil. Nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) are needed in the highest concentrations. These major elements are commonly supplemented with fertilizer. The three numbers on the front of fertilizer bags are often called the ''N-P-K" numbers.

    In addition to these major nutrients, secondary nutrients and micronutrients are also essential for plant growth. Understanding fertilizer terminology and the different types of nitrogen sources is important when establishing a lawn management plant. Nontraditional or "organic" fertilizers are also an option for homeowners. Published on Jul 31, 2016.

  • Using Water Wisely with Automated Irrigation Systems (C 870)

    In Georgia, irrigation supplements rainfall and most years, even in summer, irrigation isn't needed every day. With a little careful observation, you can learn to determine your landscape plants' water needs. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Water-wise Landscape Guide for the Georgia Piedmont (B 1444)

    Do you want a landscape that is beautiful, saves you time, effort and money and uses less water? If you do, a water-wise landscape is for you. Water-wise landscapes are designed, organized, and maintained by practices that use water strategically and wisely. Follow the seven basic steps outlined in this guide to create a beautiful water-wise yard or home garden. Published on Jul 2, 2015.

  • Weed Wizard Series: Controlling Florida Betony in the Landscape (C 867-11)

    Florida betony is a “winter” perennial and has a square stem with opposite leaves. Florida betony (also called rattlesnake weed and hedge nettle) is a problem weed in both turfgrasses and ornamentals. Published on May 31, 2014.

Unavailable Publications

The following publications are under review and are not currently available. Contact the author(s) or publications editors for more information.