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Publications on Horticulture

242 publications were found.

  • 2006 Georgia Gold Medal Winners (C 908)

    Each year a group of Green Industry Professionals from throughout Georgia gather to select a slate of outstanding ornamental plants in five categories: annual flower, herbaceous perennial, vine, shrub and tree. Only one plant in each category can earn the Gold Medal Award for outstanding performance. Published on Feb 28, 2016.

  • 2009 Georgia Gold Medal Winners (C 908-2)

    Each year, a group of Green Industry and academic professionals from Georgia convene to select outstanding ornamental plants in five categories: annual flower, herbaceous perennial, vine, shrub and tree. Published on Feb 28, 2016.

  • 2010 Georgia Gold Medal Winners (C 908-3)

    Each year, outstanding ornamental plants are chosen by an elite group of industry and academic professionals. The Georgia Gold Medal Award is given to only one plant in each of five categories: annual flower, herbaceous perennial, vine, shrub, and tree. Published on Feb 28, 2016.

  • 2013 Vegetable Crops Research Report cover image 2013 Vegetable Crops Research Report (AP 113)

    This publication contains a report of research trials done on vegetable crops in Georgia in 2013. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • 2014 University of Georgia Vidalia Onion Extension and Research Report (AP 114)

    This publication is a report of 2012-2014 onion research variety trials and Extension activity at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • 2014/2015 Vegetable Crop Variety Trial and Research Report (AP 115)

    This publication is a report of research and Cooperative Extension trials conducted on cole crops, beans and peas, sweet corn, cucurbits, peppers, and tomato at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • A Guide for Commercial Production of Vinca (B 1219)

    Vinca is a specialty ornamental crop with very distinct requirements. This bulletin will address those requirements and cover a typical production schedule and crop budget. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Alternatives to Petroleum-Based Containers for the Nursery Industry (B 1407)

    Beginning in the 1970s, container nursery production acreage rapidly increased such that container nursery production is now the dominant
    method of nursery production. As a standard in the industry, plastic
    nursery containers are lightweight, durable, familiar to growers, work well with automation, and can be reused or recycled. However, they are limited in their ability to be sustainably eco-friendly. This publication contains information about alternatives to petroleum-based containers for the nursery industry. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Alternatives to Synthetic Herbicides for Weed Management in Container Nurseries (B 1410)

    Weed management is one of the most critical and costly aspects for container nursery production. High irrigation and fertilization rates create a favorable environment for weed growth in addition to crop growth. Weeds can quickly out-compete the crop for light and other resources, reducing the rate and amount of crop growth as well as salability. Weed management in nursery production is most effectively achieved by preventative practices, primarily with the use of pre-emergent herbicides. However, there are valid reasons for managing weeds using alternatives to synthetic herbicides. Weed management alternatives to synthetic herbicides include sanitation, exclusion, prevention, hand weeding, mulching and use of cover crops, heat and non-synthetic herbicides. Only some of these alternative methods can be used to control weeds in containers, but all can be used to manage weeds around containers and in non-crop
    areas. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Attracting Birds to Your Backyard (C 976)

    To attract and maintain a bird population, a habitat should provide (1) food, (2) shelter/nesting areas and (3) water. This publication describes several ways to attract birds to your backyard. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Basic Principles of Pruning Woody Plants (B 949)

    Pruning is one of the most important cultural practices for maintaining woody plants, including ornamental trees and shrubs, fruits and nuts. Proper pruning requires a basic understanding of how plants respond to various pruning cuts. The principles and guidelines in this publication will help you master common pruning techniques. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Best Management Practices in the Landscape (C 873)

    Research has shown that if you properly select, install and maintain ornamental plant, you greatly increase their survival and performance in the landscape. Following BMPs (Best Management Practices) not only conserve moisture in the landscape but will assure overall health and vigor of the ornamental plants. Published on Nov 30, 2016.

  • Blossom-End Rot and Calcium Nutrition of Pepper and Tomato (C 938)

    The purpose of this publication is to introduce the problem of blossom-end rot and provide a guide to effectively diagnose and treat this problem. Published on Apr 30, 2015.

  • Budding and Grafting of Pecan (B 1376)

    Individuals who propagate trees have their own personal preferences with regard to propagation methods. As with many practices related to pecan production, timing is important for successful propagation. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Cantaloupe and Specialty Melons (B 1179)

    This publication was compiled to meet the needs of the growing cantaloupe industry in Georgia. Its 10 chapters represent the latest information available on successful cantaloupe and specialty melon production. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Care of Holiday and Gift Plants cover image Care of Holiday and Gift Plants (C 951)

    Flowering and foliage plants can make welcome gifts. How long they remain attractive may be directly related to the care and handling they are given. This publication describes ways to properly care for holiday and gift plants to ensure maximum longevity. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Care of Ornamental Plants in the Landscape (B 1065)

    Most established ornamental plants in the landscape require care to stay healthy and attractive. Regular fertilization, pruning, watering, mulching and pest control are all part of a good landscape management program. This publication provides guidelines for the care of established ornamental plants in the landscape. Low-maintenance alternatives to traditional cultural practices are discussed throughout the publication. Published on Feb 28, 2016.

  • Citrus Fruit for Southern and Coastal Georgia (B 804)

    Citrus plants are very versatile around the home and may be used as individual specimens, hedges or container plants. Their natural beauty and ripe fruits make them attractive additions to the South Georgia home scene. Cold-hardy varieties that receive recommended care may grow successfully in the coastal and extreme southern areas of the state (and to a lesser degree in more northern locations). Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Classic City Garden Awards Series: 2013's Best New Plants from the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia (AP 116-1)

    This publication showcases the plants that were awarded the “Classic City Award” in 2013. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • Classic City Garden Awards Series: 2014's Best New Plants from the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia (AP 116-2)

    This publication showcases the plants that were awarded the “Classic City Award” in 2014. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • Classic City Garden Awards Series: 2015's Best New Plants from the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia (AP 116-3)

    This publication showcases the plants that were awarded the “Classic City Award” in 2015. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • Clover Management in Pecan Orchards (B 1360)

    An orchard floor provides a working surface for orchard operations and influences activities in the trees, which produce the crop. An efficient orchard floor cover does not compete heavily with trees for moisture and nutrients and is compatible with orchard insect populations. While weed competition with tree roots is significant throughout the life of the tree, in a newly planted orchard, weed competition can significantly reduce young tree survival and can stunt tree growth. Weed competition can reduce tree growth and yield, as well as promote alternate bearing in mature trees. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Commercial Okra Production (C 627)

    Okra is grown in every county in Georgia. Okra can be a profitable crop when recommended production practices are followed. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Commercial Pecan Spray Guide (B 841)

    This publication provides guidance for insect, disease and weed control in commercial pecan orchards for 2016. Published on Mar 30, 2014.

  • Commercial Production and Management of Cabbage and Leafy Greens (B 1181)

    The 11 topics covered in this publication are all integral parts of a successful cabbage/leafy greens management program. Each topic focuses on a particular aspect of production and provides information on the latest management technology for that phase of production. It is hoped that the information contained in this publication will assist growers in improving profitability. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Commercial Production and Management of Carrots (B 1175)

    The 13 topics covered in this publication are all integral parts of a successful carrot management program. Each topic is designed to focus on a particular aspect of production and provide the latest management technology for that phase of production. It is hoped that the information contained in this publication will assist growers in improving profitability in carrot production. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Commercial Production and Management of Pumpkins and Gourds (B 1180)

    The seven topics covered in this publication are all integral parts of a successful pumpkin/gourd management program. Each topic is designed to focus on a particular aspect of production and provide the latest management technology for that phase of production. It is hoped that the information contained in this publication will assist growers in improving profitability. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Commercial Production of English Ivy (B 1206)

    Disclaimer: The Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council lists Hedera helix, English Ivy, as a Category I invasive plant. While it does not recommend English Ivy uses in the landscape, this publication provides information for its culture as a potted plant. Some cultivars of English Ivy may become invasive in certain environments if planted in the landscape. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Commercial Production of Vegetable Transplants (B 1144)

    Producing greenhouse-grown containerized transplants is an increasingly popular way to establish vegetable crops. Compared to field-grown transplants, greenhouse transplants have several advantages. They can be produced earlier and more uniformly than field-grown plants. Their growth can be controlled more easily through fertility and water management and they can be held longer and harvested when needed. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Commercial Snap Bean Production in Georgia (B 1369)

    This is an in-depth publication covering Culture and Varieties,
    Soils and Fertility, Irrigation, Sprayers, Diseases, Insect Management, Weed Control, Food Safety and Sanitation, Harvest/Post-Harvest and Waste Management, Marketing, Production Costs, and Organic Production of commercial snap bean production in Georgia. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Commercial Southern Pea Production (C 485)

    This horticulture publication is about the commercial production of southern peas. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Commercial Squash Production (C 527)

    Squash (Cucurbita spp.) is a member of the cucurbit family, which consists of a number of warm-season vegetables. Another broad group of squash called winter squash. Each group is classified into several types based on fruit shape and color. Warm-season squash are harvested while immature while winter squash are harvested at maturity. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Commercial Sweet Potato Production (B 677)

    This publication contains comprehensive information on growing sweet potatoes for commercial production. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Commercial Tomato Production Handbook cover image Commercial Tomato Production Handbook (B 1312)

    This publication is a joint effort of the seven disciplines that comprise the Georgia Vegetable Team. It is comprised of 14 topics on tomato, including history of tomato production, cultural practices, pest management, harvesting, handling and marketing. This publication provides information that will assist producers in improving the profitability of tomato production, whether they are new or experienced producers. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Commercial Watermelon Production (B 996)

    Watermelon is a warm-season crop related to cantaloupe, squash, cucumber and pumpkin. Watermelons can be grown on any well-drained soil throughout Georgia but are particularly well adapted to the Coastal Plain soils of South Georgia. Watermelons will continue to be an important part of vegetable production in the state. Increases in average yield per acre will continue as more growers adopt plastic mulch, intensive management and new hybrid varieties. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Common Landscape Diseases in Georgia (B 1238)

    This publication describes some of the most troublesome diseases of Georgia's landscape plants. The following material will help you identify these diseases and offers recommendations for treatment. Knowledge about the common diseases of Georgia landscape plants will allow professional and amateur growers alike to better fight plant diseases and produce healthy plants. Published on May 30, 2015.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Extending the Crop Season: Unheated Spaces (C 1027-14)

    This publication describes common myths about cold protection and provides options for protecting plants from the cold in community and school gardens, including cold frames, row covers and hoop houses. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Garden Fencing (C 1027-9)

    This publication describes options for fencing a community or school garden, including fence types and materials. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Garden Sheds (C 1027-7)

    This publication provides information about storage sheds for community and school gardens, including local building codes, siting a shed, and alternatives to traditional sheds. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Growing Fruits (C 1027-10)

    Community gardens designed to provide locally grown food for families can be used to grow fruits in addition to the more commonly grown vegetables. There are many common and lesser-known fruits that are suited for planting in community garden situations. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Irrigation (C 1027-12)

    This publication describes irrigation methods suitable for community or school gardens, including overhead sprinklers, hand watering and drip irrigation. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Less Expensive Sources of Plant Material, Amendments and Tools (C 1027-6)

    This publication offers advice on finding less expensive sources of plant material, amendments and tools for community and school gardens. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Planning an Edible Garden (C 1027-1)

    This publication describes three steps for planning a school garden: garden location, soil and terrain, and choosing crops. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Raised Bed Materials (C 1027-5)

    This publication describes the advantages and disadvantages of various materials used for building raised beds, including types of wood, composite materials, recycled materials, and kits. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Raised Beds vs. In-Ground Gardens (C 1027-3)

    This publication describes the advantages and disadvantages of raised bed and in-ground gardens and may be used as a guide when planning a community or school garden project. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Raised Garden Bed Dimensions (C 1027-4)

    This publication helps determine the ideal dimensions of raised beds for community and school gardens by focusing on three things: materials, slope and accessibility. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Siting a Garden (C 1027-2)

    This publication provides recommendations for properly siting a school or community garden, taking into account sunlight exposure, water availability, slope, garden access, tool storage, compost bins and other amenities. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Sources of Water for the Garden (C 1027-11)

    This publication discusses the advantages and disadvantages of various sources of water for a community or school garden, including municipal water, rivers or creeks, ponds, wells and rainwater. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Stocking the Toolshed: Hand Tools (C 1027-8)

    This publication describes the types and quantities of hand tools that work best for community and school gardens, including shovels, rakes, trowels, hand pruners, gloves, children's tools, and carts and wheelbarrows. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Weed Control (C 1027-13)

    This publication describes weed control methods that are appropriate for community and school gardens. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Composting and Mulching cover image Composting and Mulching (C 816)

    This publication explains how to build, maintain a compost pile as well as how to use compost and mulch in the yard and garden. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Composting: Recycling Landscape Trimmings (C 981)

    Citizens throughout Georgia are recycling newspaper, cans, glass and plastic in an effort to divert these materials from the waste stream. Another important part of waste reduction involves recycling leaves, lawn clippings, and tree and shrub trimmings instead of placing them curbside for the county or municipality to pick up. These landscape riches from Mother Nature can be easily recycled and turned into nutrient-rich organic matter right in your backyard through a process called composting. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Conserving Water in the Vegetable Garden (C 964)

    All vegetables, especially tomatoes, like an even supply of water throughout the growing season, and will often develop problems if their water supply fluctuates. If watering restrictions or bans are imposed, water conservation becomes a critical issue. Published on Apr 30, 2015.

  • Considerations for the Small Market Producer cover image Considerations for the Small Market Producer (C 1090)

    This publication is intended for general use audiences, including farmers and those considering entering into small market vegetable production. It covers the many things to consider before jumping into this venture such as planning, marketing, liability and taxes. Published on Jul 31, 2016.

  • Controlling Growth in Five Species of Herbaceous Foliage Plants (C 925)

    Plant growth retardants (PGRs) are commonly used in greenhouse production to obtain full and compact plants that are visually desirable to the consumer, as well as easier and less expensive to ship. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Conversion Tables, Formulas and Suggested Guidelines for Horticultural Use cover image Conversion Tables, Formulas and Suggested Guidelines for Horticultural Use (B 931)

    Pesticide and fertilizer recommendations are often made on a pounds per acre and tons per acre basis. While these may be applicable to field production of many crops, orchardists, nurserymen and greenhouse operators often must convert these recommendations to smaller areas, such as row feet, square feet, or even per tree or per pot. Thus pints, cups, ounces, tablespoons and teaspoons are the common units of measure. The conversion is frequently complicated by metric units of measure. This publication is designed to aid growers in making these calculations and conversions, and also provides other data useful in the management, planning and operation of horticultural enterprises. Published on Feb 28, 2016.

  • Cultural Management of Commercial Pecan Orchards (B 1304)

    In order for a commercial pecan operation to be consistently successful, the goal of the operation should be annual production of a moderate crop of high quality nuts, rather than the production of a high yield in a single given year. Culturally, there are several basic factors that will help to promote optimum profitability with a commercial pecan orchard. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Cultural Management of the Bearing Peach Orchard (C 879)

    When the peach tree moves into its bearing years a shift in emphasis from exclusive attention to vegetative development for building a tree structure to maintaining a balance enough vegetative growth to promote adequate fruiting wood and return bloom for the following season’s fruit crop and managing the current season’s fruit crop. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Dahlias (C 576)

    Dahlias are among the most spectacular flowers you can grow in your garden. Hundreds of varieties are available, with flower sizes ranging from 1 to 14 inches in diameter. Almost any color except true
    blue can be produced in Georgia. In exchange for their beauty, dahlias require dedicated care. Most of them need special soil preparation, staking, watering during dry periods, disbudding and a
    strict insect control program. This publication contains information about successfully growing dahlias in Georgia. Published on Jan 31, 2015.

  • Deer-Tolerant Ornamental Plants (C 985)

    If deer are overabundant in your neighborhood, and deer herd reduction or management is not feasible, a good way to prevent deer browsing in landscapes is to plant ornamental plants that deer do not like to eat. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Diagnostic Guide to Common Home Orchard Diseases cover image Diagnostic Guide to Common Home Orchard Diseases (B 1336)

    This publication is intended to be used as a pictorial diagnostic guide to identify the most common diseases seen on fruits grown in home landscapes, gardens, and/or orchards in Georgia. Use this guide as a supplemental resource and/or reference to the Homeowner Edition of the Georgia Pest Management Handbook. Published on May 30, 2015.

  • Diagnostics System for Crop History and Disorders in Greenhouses and Nurseries (B 1273)

    This diagnostic system is designed as a tool to assist growers, Extension specialists and county agents to diagnose problems with ornamental crops. The document consists of six major sections and five appendices. Each section is designed to supply information on various important aspects of the crop under scrutiny. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Digital Photography for Horticulture Professionals Series: Part 1: General Photography (B 1254-1)

    This publication series is designed to help you learn the basics of how to compose photos, overcome locations with less than optimal light conditions, and become acquainted with the terminology used in digital photography. They are also designed to teach you how to enhance and manipulate (edit) images and insert them into documents using a software program. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Digital Photography for Horticulture Professionals Series: Part 2: Digital Terminology and Essential Elements of Photo-Editing (B 1254-2)

    In Part I of this publication series, we discussed the basics of taking quality digital images from a photography standpoint, or the image capture. Now we will turn our attention to the terms used in digital imagery. Digital picture making can be described as a three-step process: image capture, image processing and image output. During each of these steps, understanding of digital terms and how they are applied is essential. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Digital Photography for Horticulture Professionals Series: Part 3: Digital Image Applications in Crop Diagnostics (B 1254-3)

    Digital photography can be readily applied in crop diagnostics. In documenting crop damages for example, growers may need to take a series of pictures to better illustrate the specific problem and provide sufficient information for diagnosis. Additionally, the higher the quality of the pictures, the higher the chances of accurate and rapid diagnosis of the problem. Proper contrast and color are essential in diagnosing some nutritional imbalances, for example. For optimal results in obtaining the best digital photographs, here are some simple rules to follow. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Diseases of Leyland Cypress in the Landscape (B 1229)

    Leyland cypress has become one of the most widely used plants in commercial and residential landscapes across Georgia as a formal hedge, screen, buffer strip or wind barrier. Leyland cypress (x Cupressocyparis leylandii) is a graceful, rapidly growing evergreen tree that is adapted for growth within the 6-10a USDA hardiness zones. Leyland cypress is considered relatively pest-free; however, because of its relatively shallow root system, and because they are often planted too close together and in poorly drained soils, Leyland cypress is prone to root rot and several damaging canker diseases, especially during periods of prolonged drought. Disease management is, therefore, a consideration for Leyland cypress. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Drip Chemigation: Injecting Fertilizer, Acid and Chlorine (B 1130)

    Drip irrigation is an important component of vegetable production systems in Georgia. Drip irrigation is more desirable than other irrigation methods for several reasons. Two important advantages are (1) water conservation and (2) potentially significantly improving fertilizer management. Fertigation is the timely application of small amounts of fertilizer through drip tubes directly to the root zone. Compared to conventional ground application, fertigation improves fertilizer efficiency. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Drip Irrigation Check List: Start-Up (C 1093)

    This publication reviews the critical items to address when starting a drip irrigation system that has been idle. This is important information for specialty crop producers and homeowners that have drip irrigation systems servicing fruit, nut, and vegetable crops. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Drip Irrigation Check List: Winterization (C 1094)

    This publication addresses winterization of a drip irrigation system. The circular includes information about winterization timing, components of a drip system, precautions to take when servicing a drip system, and a quick reference run-down to the winterization process. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Drip Irrigation in the Home Vegetable Garden (C 1095)

    This publication is designed to give small market growers, homeowners, and Master Gardener audiences a quick guide to selecting and installing drip irrigation in the vegetable garden. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Eco-Friendly Garden: Attracting Pollinators, Beneficial Insects, and Other Natural Predators cover image Eco-Friendly Garden: Attracting Pollinators, Beneficial Insects, and Other Natural Predators (B 1456)

    A pollinator-friendly and ecologically sustainable garden is both beautiful and able to attract and sustain beneficial insects, reducing the need for pesticides. This publication is based on new research in habitat management for purposes of planting insect-attracting plant species in order to intentionally draw insects to garden areas and urban landscapes. This is done by providing a refuge for the insects during winter and nectar and pollen resources. Plant selection directly affects beneficial insect populations, those insects that can provide ecological benefits such as biodiversity and natural pest control. This concept of “habitat management” can lead to potential increases in pollinating and other beneficial insect populations. An increase in these populations in landscapes will contribute to improved pollination of plants and biological pest control and reduce the need for pesticides. Published on May 31, 2016.

  • Environmental Enhancement with Ornamental Plants: Butterfly Gardening (C 975)

    Butterfly populations can be greatly enhanced by devoting a portion of the landscape to butterfly habitat. In addition to their natural beauty, butterflies serve as valuable plant pollinators. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Environmentally Friendly Landscape Practices (C 967)

    With proper planning, planting and maintenance, a healthier landscape can be created with less expense, less work and less damage to the world around us. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Essential pH Management in Greenhouse Crops: pH and Plant Nutrition (B 1256)

    Your goal as a greenhouse grower is to maintain a stable pH over the life of the crop. This is not an easy task since many factors can affect pH in the growing substrate. The pH can go up or down within several weeks of the crop cycle and if you wait for deficiency or toxicity symptoms to develop, you have already compromised the health of the crop and you r profits. Knowing all factors involved is the first step to managing the substrate pH. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Establishing a Pecan Orchard (B 1314)

    A well-planned, organized orchard will be more efficient, require less input and offer larger potential returns. Select the orchard location based on its soil type, drainage, water table and land topography. Straight rows in planted orchards make maintenance, irrigation and harvest easier. Tree growth and spacing requirements can also be anticipated for the early planting and subsequent orchard thinnings. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Experiments and Observations on Growing Mayhaws as a Crop in South Georgia and North Florida (C 966)

    Limited information is available on the commercial production of mayhaws; thus, the objective of our research has been to: 1) determine if mayhaws are adapted to commercial orchard production, 2) identify cultivars with excellent cropping ability and quality, and 3) identify potential problems in their commercial production, such as insects and diseases. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Fall Gardening: A Collection of Information and Resources (AP 105)

    This publication is an annually-updated guide to fall gardening information and resources for Georgia. Topics include planting tall fescue lawns, soil bag flower beds, planting pansies like the pros, planting collards, turnips and cabbage, planting a home fruit orchard, mulching with leaves, gardening chores, cleaning and storing garden tools, treating for fire ants, and additional resources. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • Fertilizer Injectors: Selection, Maintenance and Calibration (B 1237)

    Fertilizer injectors are devices used to apply water-soluble fertilizers, pesticides, plant growth regulators, wetting agents and mineral acids during crop production. They are a vital part of modern greenhouse or nursery operations. Despite the advantages, many growers have had at least one experience with a compromised, damaged or even ruined crop where the cause was traced to a malfunctioning injector. Just like other mechanical devices, proper and frequent maintenance and calibration are crucial steps to ensure optimal injector performance and, thus, healthy crops. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Fertilizing Blueberries in Pine Bark Beds (B 1291)

    Grower experiences have proven milled pine bark to be an excellent growing substrate for southern highbush blueberries. Although milled pine bark shares many characteristics with good blueberry soil, fundamental differences exist and need to be understood for rapid growth of young plants and high blueberry yields. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Fireblight: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment (C 871)

    Fireblight is a destructive, highly infectious, and widespread disease. It attacks blossoms, leaves, shoots, branches, fruits, and roots. This publication has some facts and methods to avoid and control the disease. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Flowering Annuals for Georgia Gardens (B 954)

    Annuals are the mainstay color plant of many home gardens. They are also used in increasingly large numbers in commercial and municipal landscapes because they provide landscape color in a very short time with minimal investment. Properly cared for, many annuals will brighten the landscape continuously from spring until frost kills them in the fall. Published on Jan 31, 2015.

  • Flowering Bulbs for Georgia Gardens cover image Flowering Bulbs for Georgia Gardens (B 918)

    A wide variety of bulbs grow well in Georgia. Most are grown for their flowers and some for their foliage. They are grown as pot plants, in shrub borders, naturalistic plantings and in mass displays. Bulbs offer a certain magic to the landscape virtually unrivaled by other plants. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Flowering Perennials for Georgia Gardens cover image Flowering Perennials for Georgia Gardens (B 944)

    This publication is devoted specifically to covering everything you need to know about growing herbaceous perennials, primarily to those that persist from crowns and/or fleshy roots. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Foliage Products: An Opportunity for the Georgia Ornamental Industry (B 1262)

    The majority of the plants used for interior decoration are considered “foliage plants” because of the highly decorative value of their leaves. Most of them originated in tropical and subtropical areas of the world and are adapted to low light levels, making them a natural choice for interior environments. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Fresh Market Broccoli Production for Georgia (B 1460)

    This publication addresses considerations of horticulture, entomology, and plant pathology for production of fresh market broccoli in Georgia. Published on Oct 31, 2016.

  • Gardening in Containers (C 787)

    Growing plants in containers differs from growing plants in the ground. Poorly drained potting mixture can lead to root problems. Under conditions of excess moisture and poor aeration, roots become stressed and are easily invaded by root rotting fungi. Under these circumstances, plants fail to grow properly or even die.

    In addition to guidance on soil preparation, this bulletin provides information on selecting containers, planting and fertilizing container plants, a list of plants recommend for container gardens. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Gardening in Containers Using Tropical Plants (B 1338)

    Container gardening has enjoyed an increased popularity in the last decade. With increased urbanization, container gardens have come to the rescue to brighten up patios and balconies. This publication is intended to provide information on successful gardening in containers using tropical plant materials. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Georgia Master Gardener Handbook cover image Georgia Master Gardener Handbook (AP 106)

    The Georgia Master Gardener Handbook, 7th Edition, is the official reference text produced by the University of Georgia and developed for Master Gardener training. For more information about the Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteer Program, visit www.GAmastergardener.org.

    This book, published in 2011, is currently available at $75 per copy (including tax and shipping). Single copies (no certificate or badge included) may be purchased online with a credit card at www.caes.uga.edu/?tiny=043XMU. Delivery will be 7-14 business days from receipt of order. Please include a street address rather than a P.O. box. Sales of books and data are considered final. Materials returned due to damage in shipping will be replaced. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • Georgia Onion Research-Extension Report 2012 (AP 109)

    This publication is a report of 2011-2012 onion research variety trials and Extension activity at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • Georgia Pest Management Handbook — Commercial Edition cover image Georgia Pest Management Handbook — Commercial Edition (SB 28)

    The Georgia Pest Management Handbook gives current information on selection, application and safe use of pest control chemicals. The Handbook has recommendations for pest control on farms, around homes, urban areas, recreational areas, and other environments in which pests may occur. Cultural, biological, physical, and other types of control are recommended where appropriate. Published on Mar 30, 2014.

  • Georgia Pest Management Handbook—Homeowner Edition cover image Georgia Pest Management Handbook—Homeowner Edition (SB 48)

    The Georgia Pest Management Handbook gives current information on selection, application and safe use of pest control chemicals. The Handbook has recommendations for pest control on farms, around homes, urban areas, recreational areas, and other environments in which pests may occur. Cultural, biological, physical, and other types of control are recommended where appropriate. Published on Mar 30, 2014.

  • Geraniums (B 790)

    Geraniums are among the most popular flowering
    plants grown in the United States. They are easy
    to grow and can be used in many types of gardens, such as ground beds, planter boxes, hanging baskets and pots. They are ideal for flanking entrance-ways and adding color to border plantings. This publication explains everything you need to know about growing geraniums. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Great Plants under 20 feet for Small Spaces (C 999)

    Well-chosen small trees and shrubs can provide privacy from your neighbors, separation from a road with heavy traffic or a screen to hide unattractive areas. By selecting plants that mature to a height of 20 feet or less, you can create a natural fence. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Irrigation and Technology Assessment (B 1275)

    The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establish a formal company-wide water conservation plan. Implementing this plan will facilitate more efficient use of resources and impart significant savings in water use, fertilizer and pesticides. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Management Assessment (B 1276)

    The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establish a formal companywide water conservation plan. Implementation of this plan will facilitate more efficient use of resources and impart significant savings in water use, fertilizer and pesticides. This publication will help you take a candid look at how you approach water management. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Quality Assessment (B 1277)

    The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establish a formal companywide water conservation plan. Implementation of this plan will facilitate more efficient use of resources and impart significant savings in water use, fertilizer and pesticides. This publication will help you determine your water quality and help you develop a management plan to monitor your water quality. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Recycling and Water Reuse Assessment (B 1278)

    The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establish a formal company-wide water conservation plan. Implementation of this plan will facilitate more efficient use of resources and impart significant savings in water use, fertilizer and pesticides. This publication will help you assess the feasibility of water reclamation and recycling in your operation. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Source Use and Expansion Assessment (B 1274)

    The Greenhouse*A*Syst publication Series has been developed to assist greenhouse owners with the task of assessing three management issues: Water management, Environmental Risk and Business Profitability. This publication will also help you establish a water conservation document you may find useful if and when state or local water authorities develop policies or implement water restrictions. Most water authorities are favorably impressed with businesses that have developed water conservation plans. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Greenhouse*A*Syst Series: Water Use Regulation, Legislative Awareness and Company Water Policy Assessment (B 1279)

    The Greenhouse*A*Syst series of publications is a confidential self-assessment program you can use to evaluate your greenhouse business for risks associated with water management issues. Armed with facts and figures, you will then be able to reevaluate your management strategies and determine ways to conserve water and minimize those risks. By following the guidelines, you will be able to establish a formal company-wide water conservation plan.
    Implementation of this plan will facilitate more efficient use of resources and impart significant savings in water use, fertilizer and pesticides. This section will help you develop a plan to
    conserve water resources and establish a company policy. It will also ask you to become more aware and involved in local water use legislation. By completing this section, you will reduce the risk of being caught off-guard by water shortages due to legislative and social issues in your community. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Greenhouses: Heating, Cooling and Ventilation (B 792)

    This publication contains comprehensive, in-depth information about heating, cooling and ventilating greenhouses. Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Growing African Violets (C 660)

    African violets are now among the most popular indoor plants. They are easy to grow and offer a wealth of beautiful flowers. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Growing Bamboo in Georgia (B 1357)

    This booklet is written in an attempt to filter through much of the available information and make a simple, user-friendly information guide on growing bamboo in Georgia, which has a wide variety of soils and temperate zones. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Growing Bigleaf Hydrangea (C 973)

    Bigleaf hydrangea,also called French, Japanese or snowball hydrangea, is a landscape plant. Bigleaf hydrangea can be transplanted to the landscape for repeat blooms each year. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Growing Dogwoods (C 900)

    One of the most widely planted ornamental trees in Georgia is the flowering dogwood. Dogwoods are not difficult to grow if they are located in the proper site and if healthy trees are purchased and planted properly. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Growing Ferns cover image Growing Ferns (B 737)

    Ferns became popular indoor plants during the Victorian Era. Today, they are used as specimens in atriums, greenhouses and conservatories, and we find them in the smallest apartments and the largest homes. They offer a quiet, graceful beauty by softening landscapes indoors and out. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Growing Hostas (C 955)

    Hostas are quickly becoming one of the most popular perennial plants grown in our landscapes. Sometimes referred to as plantain lilies, hostas are reliable plants for both shade and partial sun situations. This publication includes variety recommendations. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Growing Indoor Plants with Success (B 1318)

    Interior plants are an ideal way to create attractive and restful settings while enhancing our sense of well being. In addition, houseplants can be a satisfying hobby and can help purify the air in our homes. To be a successful indoor gardener, you need to understand how the interior environment affects plant growth and how cultivation differs from growing plants outdoors. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Growing Southern Magnolia (C 974)

    Southern magnolia is an aristocratic tree. It grows well throughout Georgia, is widely adaptable to a variety of soils and has few pest problems. With glossy evergreen foliage and large white fragrant blossoms, it truly is one of the most handsome and durable native trees for our Southern landscapes. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Growing Vegetables Organically (B 1011)

    This publication is a comprehensive guide to growing vegetables organically, including location, planning, irrigation, soil preparation, composting, fertilizers, successive planting and crop rotation, mulching and insect control. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Guidelines for On-Site Use of Scrap Wallboard in Georgia Residential Construction (C 857)

    This publication discusses the use of scrap wallboard at residential construction sites. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Herbs in Southern Gardens (B 1170)

    Growing herbs - both annuals and perennials - is simple and rewarding. A wide variety of herbs can grow in most parts of the United States. Those featured in this publication grow well in the Deep South with its hot, humid summers and fluctuating winter temperatures. Published on Jun 30, 2014.

  • Home Fruit Orchard Pruning Techniques cover image Home Fruit Orchard Pruning Techniques (C 1087)

    This circular is a compilation of pruning techniques for apple, pear, peach, blackberry, blueberry, grapes, and pomegranate. Included are tools for pruning, definitions and descriptions of terms used in pruning, and diagrams illustrating best pruning practices. This work has important and relevant information about pruning and plant care for the home orchardist. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Home Garden Series: Garlic Production for the Gardener (C 854)

    This publication give the gardener tips to successfully produce garlic. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Georgia Home Grown Tomatoes cover image Home Garden Series: Georgia Home Grown Tomatoes (B 1271)

    This publication discusses the basics of growing tomatoes successfully, as well as avoiding common problems encountered by the home gardener. Published on Apr 30, 2015.

  • Home Garden Series: Growing Home Garden Sweet Corn (C 905)

    Sweet corn is not difficult to grow and, by following the cultural guidelines provided in this publication, you too can enjoy this sweet delicacy. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Growing Rutabagas in the Home Garden (C 942)

    Rutabagas are a cool-season root crop that can be produced in the spring or fall. Published on Jan 31, 2015.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Apples (C 740)

    Apples are adapted to most areas of Georgia. Although the northern half of the state is best suited for the more "conventional" apple varieties, you can have success in the southern half of Georgia with adapted varieties. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Asparagus (C 1026)

    For gardeners who are willing to put in a little effort and have some patience, asparagus can be a rewarding and delicious vegetable to grow. This publication explains how to grow asparagus in a home vegetable garden. Published on Nov 30, 2015.

  • Home Garden Blueberries cover image Home Garden Series: Home Garden Blueberries (C 946)

    Under good management, the native Georgia rabbiteye blueberry bushes will produce some fruit the second or third year after transplanting. By the sixth year they will yield as much as 2 gallons each and continue to increase as the plants get larger. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Broccoli (C 1022)

    Broccoli is a cool-weather vegetable that can easily be grown in the garden in early spring or fall. Broccoli belongs to the Brassica family. Research shows that plants from this family are extremely healthy to consume and have the potential to reduce certain types of cancer. This publication describes the basics for growing broccoli in the home garden, from starting the plants from seeds to cooking and storage. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Brussels Sprouts (C 1069)

    Brussels sprouts belong to the cole crop family, which includes cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and several leafy greens. The name Brussels comes from the city Brussels, Belgium, where the vegetable first became popular. Brussels sprouts are a cool season vegetable that can be grown both in the fall and early spring.

    This publication explains the basics on how to grow Brussels sprouts in the home garden. It covers soil preparation, planting, and maintenance, as well as controlling pest problems. Published on Oct 31, 2015.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Bunch Grapes (B 807)

    Bunch grapes are often called “pod” grapes in rural Georgia since they produce large clusters of fruit. Georgia’s climate is not well-suited to home garden production of European bunch grapes, but American bunch grapes and hybrids between the two species (French hybrids) grow well in Georgia. If grapes are well cared for and sprayed when diseases and insects threaten, you can expect yields of 20 to 30 pounds of fruit per vine. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Cauliflower (C 1023)

    Cauliflower is a cool season vegetable that belongs to the Brassicaceae family, and is sometimes considered one of the more difficult vegetables to grow in the home garden. For those gardeners who have a little patience, cauliflower can be an interesting and rewarding crop to grow. Gardeners can now select varieties of cauliflower that range in color from the traditional white to a deep purple. This publication describes how to grow cauliflower in the home garden, from starting plants from seeds to insect and disease control. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Eggplant (C 1028)

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena) was introduced into the United States by Thomas Jefferson, who brought this heat-loving member of the Solanaceus family from Europe. While the original eggplants actually looked white, similar to chicken eggs, they now come in many shapes, sizes and colors. Eggplant can be grown in all Georgia gardens, and with some care, the harvest can be quite prolific. They can also be grown in containers for their ornamental and decorative features. This publication contains information on growing eggplant in the home garden. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Home Garden Figs cover image Home Garden Series: Home Garden Figs (C 945)

    Most people are fond of figs. They are tasty and can be eaten fresh, preserved, or used for baking and making desserts. Figs will do well in most parts of Georgia except the mountainous areas. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Green Beans (C 1006)

    Green beans are one of the most popular vegetables for the home garden. Fortunately, they are easy to grow as well. This short publication provides basic information on growing green beans in the home vegetable garden. Published on Aug 31, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Lettuce (C 1018)

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is a cool-season vegetable that can be planted in early fall or early spring in Georgia. This publication discusses growing lettuce in the home garden. Published on Apr 30, 2015.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Muscadines (C 949)

    Muscadines are truly a fruit for the south. Although muscadines can be grown successfully in most parts of the state, they are best adapted to the Piedmont and Coastal Plain areas. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Okra (C 941)

    Okra is a Southern staple in the home garden and at the dinner table and can be grown throughout the state of Georgia. This vegetable is both easy and fun to grow and can be used in many different culinary dishes and for dried flower arrangements. Published on Aug 31, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Peaches (C 1063)

    Growing peaches and other fruit trees in Georgia and the southeastern United States is challenging. Peaches are not native to North America; however, many cultivars have been developed for our area, and Georgia has a long history of successful peach production. One must choose the site and the proper cultivar and provide care throughout the year to be successful.

    This publication includes information for peaches on site selection and preparation, planting, fertilizing, insects, diseases, and harvesting. Recommended varieties for Georgia are also listed. Published on Feb 11, 2015.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Pears (C 742)

    Pears are adapted to nearly all of Georgia. It is not uncommon to find trees as much as 50 years old that are still producing fruit. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Peppers (C 1005)

    The rich, full flavor and freshness of a home-grown pepper just picked from the bush are the gardener's reward for growing their own peppers. Fortunately, the most popular pepper varieties are easy to grow as long as you understand and follow a few basic gardening principles. Published on Aug 31, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Persimmons (C 784)

    Many of the numerous species of persimmon can be grown in Georgia. Our native persimmon, Diospyros virginiana, is found from Florida north to Connecticut, west to Iowa and south to Texas. This publication covers planting and growing requirements as well as fruiting, harvesting, and insect pest information. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Potatoes (C 1011)

    This publication discusses selecting the right types of potatoes, proper planting, maintenance and troubleshooting problems. Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Raspberries and Blackberries (C 766)

    Blackberries and raspberries are one of the most popular fruits to grow and they are among the easiest for the home gardener to successfully produce. Blackberries and raspberries come as erect types (no trellis required) and trailing types (trellis required), depending on the varieties selected. This publication discusses growing raspberries and blackberries in a home garden. Published on Jul 31, 2016.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Strawberries (C 883)

    Strawberry beds need a small area that receives full sun most or all day to get started. Strawberries will grow well in many types of soil, but the most desirable soil is fertile, medium-light in texture, well drained and with good moisture-holding capacity. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Sweet Potatoes (C 1014)

    Georgia is the perfect place to grow sweet potatoes (Ipomea atatas). Sweet potatoes are considered a long season crop and Georgia's long, hot summers allow them to grow and mature well here. You might consider adding sweet potatoes to the crops you plan on growing in your garden. This publication contains concise information about growing sweet potatoes in the home garden. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Swiss Chard (C 1039)

    This publication briefly explains how to grow Swiss chard in the home garden, including soil preparation, planting, culture and fertilization, harvesting, storing and using, problems and a list of suggested varieties. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Home Garden Watermelon cover image Home Garden Series: Home Garden Watermelon (C 1035)

    This publication discusses growing watermelon in the home garden, including transplanting, starting seeds, soil preparation, culture and fertilization, harvesting, storage and use, and problems. It also includes a list of recommended varieties for Georgia. Published on Sep 30, 2016.

  • Home Garden Series: Homegrown Summer and Winter Squash (C 993)

    Squash are very nutritious, have high fiber content and are high in vitamins A and C. Squash are not difficult to grow. This publication gives information on type selection, planting, harvesting and storage. It also gives you tips on the problems with insects and diseases you may encounter. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Home Garden Series: Plums for Georgia Home Gardens (C 881)

    Plums are not only popular for cooking and jam making, they’re enjoyed fresh as well. The sweeter varieties are among the more delicious dessert fruits. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Starting Plants From Seed for the Home Gardener (B 1432)

    A number of plants, particularly vegetables, annuals, and herbs, can be grown
    from seed. There are many advantages to propagating plants from seed. This publication provides information on seed selection, materials, seeding techniques, thinning, and transplanting. A step-by-step, quick reference guide is also included. Published on Oct 1, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Using Cover Crops in the Home Garden (C 1057)

    Cover crops can be an important component to any home garden. They are used for various reasons, including building the soil, controlling soil erosion, and limiting the initiation and spread of certain diseases and insects in the soil. This publication is designed for homeowner and Master Gardener audiences and discusses the benefits, selection, planting and use of cover crops in the home garden. Published on Sep 30, 2014.

  • Vegetable Garden Calendar cover image Home Garden Series: Vegetable Garden Calendar (C 943)

    The recommendations in this circular are based on long-term average dates of the last killing frost in the spring and first killing frost in the fall. Every year does not conform to the "average," so you should use your own judgment about advancing or delaying the time for each job, depending on weather conditions. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Hort Management: For Landscape Managers (B 1261)

    HORT Management is an allied program for estimating landscape management costs. This program assists the user in estimating labor, material and equipment costs on a particular job, a break-even price, and bid price on a job. Industry average data and time/task data is used throughout the program, such as the time it takes to mow 1,000 sq. ft. with a certain size mower and equipment cost per hour of operation. The user is encouraged to modify and tailor the program with his own data and costs. For more information, see http://www.hort.uga.edu/extension/programs/hortmanage.html Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Hort Scape: For Landscape Installers (B 1317)

    Hort Scape streamlines the bidding process once the user builds a coded database of plants, including common and botanical names, plant sizes, plant costs, and per plant installation costs. Then, using the bid estimator, the user inputs the plant codes and quantities for the plants used on a particularly job, and the associated information on each plant is brought over from the database to the estimator. Other sections of the estimator calculate costs of bed amendments, fertilizers, turfgrass installation, grading, watering, edging, pre-kill with herbicides, plant removal, and clean-up. All these costs are then transferred to a bid summary sheet which shows labor, material and equipment cost for each task performed. The bid summary shows direct job costs, bid price, break-even price, profit on the job and overhead recovery. For more information, see http://www.hort.uga.edu/extension/programs/hortmanage.html Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • How to Convert an Inorganic Fertilizer Recommendation to an Organic One (C 853)

    Many farmers and gardeners use natural minerals and organic fertilizers rather than synthetic ones to build their soil. If you use organic materials as all or part of your fertilization program, this publication will help you calculate the proper amount to use from the recommendations provided by a soil test. Published on Sep 30, 2014.

  • How to Start a Community Garden: Getting People Involved (B 1399)

    Community gardening involves cultivating people and relationships, as well as the soil. There are many ways to start a community garden. The four steps included in this publication provide guidance and suggestions that will help you create a successful community garden. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Irrigation for Lawns and Gardens (B 894)

    In order to maintain a lush, green lawn and productive garden, supplemental water in the form of irrigation is often needed during peak water use periods. Two basic types of irrigation are suitable for the home landscape: sprinkler irrigation and drip (or trickle) irrigation. This publication contains comprehensive information about irrigating lawns and gardens. Published on Mar 31, 2014.

  • Is My Tree Dying? (C 1100)

    This publication outlines a tree inspection process that will help the homeowner identity potential problems and more effectively discuss the tree's condition with an Extension agent or certified arborist. The inspection begins at the base of the tree and moves to the canopy, highlighting potential tree health problems. Published on Oct 31, 2016.

  • Junipers (C 956)

    Junipers are among one of the toughest plants for the landscape. Their hardy nature and drought tolerance make them ideal choices for many of our southern landscapes.

    It is impossible to generalize about the growth habit of junipers as the species vary from low-growing ground cover types to larger conical-pyramidal forms. Foliage color varies from lustrous dark green, to light green, blue, silver-blue, yellow and many shades in between.

    There is no limit to the different uses of junipers in the landscape. They make excellent screens, hedges, windbreaks, ground covers, foundation plants and specimens. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Landscape Basics: Color Theory (B 1396)

    This publication explores color relationships in the landscape, ways of seeing plants in terms of color, and various ways to use color successfully in plant selection and landscape design and composition. Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Landscape Basics: Crop Rotation and Cultural Practices Help Reduce Diseases in Seasonal Color Beds (B 1423)

    Landscape professionals must consider many factors when choosing the right flowering annuals to plant for a particular location. Primary considerations include high visual impact, consistent bloom for color, foliage for texture and color, sun exposure, growth habit and low-water tolerance. Cost plays an important role as well. Many landscapers typically choose common annual ornamentals and tropical perennials marketed as annuals. Particular species and cultivars tend to be favored over others for a variety of reasons; these are the bread-and-butter plants, such as cool-season pansies and warm-season petunias. Because of this, staple plants tend to be planted year after year, often in the same bed – a recipe for disease build-up, pesticide applications, loss of plants, plant replacement, dissatisfied customers, and ultimately, lower profit margins. This publication explains how to effectively use crop rotation and cultural practices to reduce disease incidence in seasonal color beds. Published on Sep 30, 2016.

  • Landscape Basics: Designing a Quality Control Program for Your Company (B 1420)

    Well-groomed landscapes are often a result of considerable effort by landscape companies. Employees make them happen with routine care and, above all, attention to detail. A quality landscape and the image employees present on the job speak highly of the professionalism of the firm. Quality control (QC) is everyone’s responsibility and an essential part of a landscaper’s job. This publication describes the basics of creating and implementing a successful quality control program for your landscaping company. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Landscape Basics: Success with Herbaceous Perennials (B 1424)

    Whether in a commercial installation or residential garden, perennial plants can be successfully
    used to offer more landscaping choices, distinguish your firm from the competition and create a niche for your landscape business. Perennial plants are complex, and it is best to contract or hire a professional landscape architect for the design phase and train knowledgeable staff in proper maintenance later on. This publication is intended to provide the basics of perennial plant biology, ideas on design and installation, and information on cultivation and maintenance of perennial beds. It should also serve as a quick guide for the most common and recommended perennials for Georgia. Common-sense tips from a professional landscaper's perspective are also included. Published on Sep 30, 2016.

  • Landscape Design Series: Choosing a Landscape Design Professional (C 1032-1)

    The landscape is a very important aspect of a home. Having a beautiful, creative and functional landscape requires some understanding of design principles, plant materials and outdoor structural elements. A landscape installation can be very simple or extremely complicated. Designing irrigation systems, outdoor lighting, stone walls and patios requires skills that go beyond those of the average homeowner. When the job seems too big, it may be time to call in a professional. This publication provides guidelines and suggestions for finding a garden designer. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Landscape Design Series: Drawing a Landscape Plan - Site Analysis (C 1032-4)

    Designing a beautiful landscape for the home can be a very enjoyable and satisfying experience. With a little homework, a landscape plan is within reach of most homeowners. Before great ideas can become a plan, you must determine the limitations and assets of the site. This publication briefly describes how to create a site analysis for landscape design. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Landscape Design Series: Drawing a Landscape Plan, The Base Map (C 1032-3)

    Preparing a landscape plan can be an enjoyable and satisfying experience if you do a little homework and follow a few guidelines. A simple landscape base map can be drawn without a computer, special software or even expensive drafting supplies, and is the first step in developing a landscape plan. The base map is an accurate representation of the existing landscape, scaled to fit the paper, showing information such as house dimensions, distance to street, and the location of trees,
    woods, driveways and sidewalks, if these are already present in the landscape. This publication explains how to draw a base map for landscape planning. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Landscape Design Series: Working with a Garden Designer (C 1032-2)

    Designing a landscape is much like designing the interior of a house. Colors, patterns and textures must be arranged in a manner that is functional and suits the taste of the owner. The one major difference with landscape design is that most of the elements are living, providing seasonal change, forever growing taller and wider, and occasionally dying. An experienced garden designer has the ability to incorporate all this information into the design, but the homeowners must do their homework and be prepared to talk to the designer. This publication will help homeowners develop a plan for working with a landscape designer. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Landscape Plants for Georgia cover image Landscape Plants for Georgia (B 625)

    This publication includes a list of good plants for Georgia organized into various sizes and groups. The design qualities of plants — their form, size, color and texture — are emphasized according to the principles and requirements of good landscape design and plant maintenance. Hardiness and disease and insect resistant qualities are also considered. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Liriope Culture in Georgia (B 755)

    Lirope, often called border grass, is one of the most useful and versatile ground cover and border plants that can be grown in Georgia. Several species and cultivars that grow well throughout the state are listed here, along with care and maintenance recommendations. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Make Every Drop Count: Managing a Water-Wise Landscape (C 895-4)

    Water-wise landscapes not only save water, they save time by requiring less routine care than most traditional landscapes. This publication offers guidelines to help you achieve these goals and conserve water when managing your landscape. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Make Every Drop Count: Proper Planting Results in Healthy, Water-Efficient Plants (C 895-3)

    Planting ornamental plants correctly increases their survivability and performance in the landscape, and it helps them develop a vigorous, healthy root system that increases their drought tolerance during periods of limited rainfall. This pubication provides research-based guidelines for proper planting. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Make Every Drop Count: Xeriscape - Seven Steps to a Water-Wise Landscape (C 895-1)

    A landscape designed, installed and managed according to Xeriscaping's seven steps uses up to 50% less water than a traditional landscape. And, a well-designed water-wise is just as attractive as a traditional landscape. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Managing Organic Refuse: Options for Green Industry Professionals (C 982)

    This publication explains some of the options available to Green Industry professionals for dealing with these organic materials. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Minor Fruits and Nuts in Georgia (B 992)

    Many types of fruits and nuts can be grown in Georgia due to our mild climate. This publication provides an outline of the culture and management of the exotic and uncommon fruits and nuts that can be grown in Georgia. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Mouse Ear of Pecan (C 893)

    Mouse ear of pecan is a growth abnormality resulting from a deficiency of nickel in the pecan tree. Only recently, the discovery was made that mouse ear indicates a severe nickel deficiency. The disorder occurs most frequently on newly transplanted trees in established orchards, but can also occur on sites where pecan has not previously been grown. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Mulching Vegetables (C 984)

    Mulch should be easily obtained, inexpensive and simple to apply, although availability and cost vary from region to region. You can usually find mulching materials in your own yard, at garden centers or from tree-service firms. This publication includes a list of mulching materials, with emphasis on their advantages and disadvantages. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Native Plants for Georgia Part I: Trees, Shrubs and Woody Vines cover image Native Plants for Georgia Part I: Trees, Shrubs and Woody Vines (B 987)

    This publication focuses on native trees, shrubs and woody vines for Georgia. It is not our intent to describe all native species — just those available in the nursery trade and those that the authors feel have potential for nursery production and landscape use. Rare or endangered species are not described. Information on each plant is provided according to the following categories: Common Name(s)/Botanical Name/Family, Characteristics, Landscape Uses, Size, Zones and Habitat. Published on Aug 31, 2014.

  • Native Plants for Georgia Part II: Ferns (B 987-2)

    There are about 12,000 species of ferns in the world today. Most are found in the tropics. Currently, Georgia is home to 36 genera, 119 species and 12 hybrid ferns. The list is constantly expanding as new plants are found. To grow ferns successfully, it is important to match the site characteristics and growing environment with the native requirements of the fern species you intend to grow. Even if a fern is native to Georgia, it may not be native to the area of the state where you live. Published on Oct 31, 2015.

  • Native Plants for Georgia Part III: Wildflowers cover image Native Plants for Georgia Part III: Wildflowers (B 987-3)

    This publication is a comprehensive guide to growing and identifying native wildflowers suitable for planting in Georgia. The term “wildflower” in this publication is a general term used to define both annual and perennial native herbaceous plants with showy flowers that have evolved with an ecosystem and grow naturally without either direct or indirect human intervention.

    NOTE: This publication is large and may take several minutes to load. Published on Dec 31, 2014.

  • Native Plants for Georgia Part IV: Grasses and Sedges (B 987-4)

    This publication describes and illustrates 48 grasses and 10 sedges native to Georgia. It is not the intent of the authors to
    describe all native grasses and sedges, but those that are most widespread or those having practical application for wildlife
    habitats, erosion control, restoration projects or landscape culture. A few of the plants are noted as being weedy or
    invasive and may not be appropriate for use in cultivated landscapes. Nonetheless, they are included to assist the reader in
    identifying them because they are abundant in the wild. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Native Plants of North Georgia: A Photo Guide for Plant Enthusiasts cover image Native Plants of North Georgia: A Photo Guide for Plant Enthusiasts (B 1339)

    This publication is intended to be a quick guide for plant enthusiasts of North Georgia. Each plant listing is accompanied by a photograph and a brief plant description. The description contains the common name, scientific name, leaf description, flower description, habitat and plant uses. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • New Trial Tropical Container Gardens (B 1361)

    With increased urbanization, container gardens continue to enjoy popularity and brighten up patios and balconies. For many reasons, tropical plants have become a staple in container gardens traditionally filled with herbaceous annuals, bulbs, succulents, perennials and woody plants. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Nursery Crop Selection and Market Implications (B 1398)

    Each year, one of the first questions both seasoned and new nursery producers, managers and owners asks is, “What plants should be propagated and/or grown in the upcoming season(s)?” Answering this question requires a complex equation of inputs ranging from the type of nursery operation that exists to physical location and market trends. For this reason, the answer to this question varies for each person or business.

    This publication describes several important factors that must be considered to properly assess which ornamental crops should be grown and which market niches exist that may dictate crop selection. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • On-Site Beneficial Use of Scrap Wallboard in Georgia Residential Construction (B 1223)

    As tipping fees have risen, interest has increased in finding alternative uses for construction wastes. Many homebuyers are also looking for environmentally sensitive building practices. This includes the recycling and reuse of construction debris rather than disposal. One of the largest waste components in residential
    construction is gypsum wallboard. In many cases, scrap wallboard can be ground and beneficially applied on the construction site, rather than transported to the landfill. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • On-Site Reuse of Ground Wood Waste from Georgia Residential Construction (B 1294)

    Currently, most construction waste is put in dumpsters and taken to a construction and demolition (C&D) landfill. However, several
    residential construction wastes can be recycled or reused as part of a “green” building practice. These include cardboard, metals, scrap wallboard, and wood waste. This publication provides you the information you need for on-site reuse of wood wastes at a residential construction site. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Onion Production Guide (B 1198-2)

    This publication represents the latest information available on the commercial production of short-day onions in South Georgia. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Organic Vidalia Onion Production (C 913)

    This publication discusses organic Vidalia onion production in Georgia, from site selection and harvesting to certification. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Ornamental Plantings on Septic Drainfields (C 1030)

    Ornamental plantings can be attractive and beneficial options for the expanse of open ground designated for a septic drainfield. Properly chosen plants help manage moisture and nutrient levels in the soils around the drainfield, and can discourage activities that may cause site compaction and reduce the effectiveness of the system. The drawback is that poor plant choices can create costly maintenance issues, and any septic drainfield repair work could disturb planting areas that you value. By following a few simple guidelines, planting in these areas can be both pretty and practical. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Pampas Grass (C 983)

    Pampas grass is a large perennial grass native to Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Mature plants can reach 10 feet tall and 6 feet wide. In late summer, silvery-white plumes rise several feet above the foliage and make a bold, dramatic statement in the landscape. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Peach Orchard Establishment and Young Tree Care (C 877)

    Essential to successful peach tree culture is selection of a location that provides adequate sunlight, cold air drainage and water drainage. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Pecan Trees for the Home or Backyard Orchard cover image Pecan Trees for the Home or Backyard Orchard (B 1348)

    Pecan trees are commonly found surrounding both urban and rural dwellings throughout Georgia. They can enhance the environment and provide additional income from the sale of nuts. This publication contains comprehensive information about pecan trees for the home or backyard orchard. Published on Nov 30, 2015.

  • Pecan Varieties for Georgia Orchards (C 898)

    The most fundamental step in pecan production is the selection of varieties or cultivars to be planted in the orchard. Planting the wrong pecan variety can be a costly mistake, resulting in considerable expense. This publication includes descriptions and photos of pecan varieties suitable for planting in Georgia orchards. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Pecan Water Requirements and Irrigation Scheduling (C 1106)

    Pecan trees have high water requirements, using as much as 60 inches of total water (including rainfall) during the growing season. Georgia receives an average of 50 inches or more of rainfall annually. While the rainfall received certainly meets a portion of the water requirement for pecan trees, periods of moisture stress occur during the growing season, particularly during the months of August and September when pecans are in the kernel filling stage and water demand is at its peak. Thus, irrigation has been proven to markedly enhance pecan production in the region.

    With increasing agricultural water use, a growing population, and declining groundwater levels, irrigation efficiency in the region is necessary for sustainability. Drip and micro-irrigation system design capacity for a mature pecan orchard should be 3600-4000 gallons of water per acre per day. Because of evaporation losses, solid-set sprinkler irrigation can require as much as 3 times more supplemental water than drip or micro-irrigation.

    Solid set irrigation systems should have a design capacity of 1.5–2 inches per week. Water stress in pecan is correlated with soil moisture from budbreak through the end of nut sizing. Pecan trees bearing a moderate to heavy crop load may undergo water stress during the kernel filling stage regardless of soil moisture level. This suggests that crop load and nut development drive the tree's demand for water. Published on Oct 31, 2016.

  • Poisonous Plants in the Landscape (C 957)

    The purpose of this publication is to familiarize you with some of the common landscape plants in Georgia known to have poisonous properties when ingested. Published on Nov 30, 2015.

  • Pollination of Vegetable Crops cover image Pollination of Vegetable Crops (C 934)

    Plants develop seeds through a process called pollination. Pollination is the transfer of pollen from the stamen (male flower part) to the pistil (female flower part). Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Pomegranate Production (C 997)

    Pomegranates have been grown as a common backyard crop for decades in the South. In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the commercial production of the fruit in Georgia and surrounding regions. This production increase is largely in response to increased demand for the fruit by the consumer. The fruit is being used in many consumer products, including tea and juice blends, nut mixes and countless other food and non-food stuffs. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Preparing the Packinghouse for Peach Season (C 880)

    The southeastern peach industry is known for the high quality of its fresh peaches. As a new peach season approaches, it is time to ready the packinghouse for output of the best peach product. Published on May 30, 2015.

  • Production and Management of Garlic, Elephant Garlic and Leek (C 852)

    This publication discusses how garlic, elephant garlic and leek can be grown successfully in South Georgia. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Professional Grounds Management Calendar (C 802)

    This publication is a monthly guide for professional managers of commercial, recreational, municipal, institutional or private grounds in Georgia. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Propagating Deciduous Fruit Plants Common to Georgia (B 818)

    Deciduous fruit plants common to Georgia must be propagated asexually because they do not come true to seed. This makes it necessary to reproduce the desired fruit plants by methods such as cuttings, runners, layering, budding or grafting. This publication discusses the common techniques used to asexually propagate fruit plants adapted to Georgia. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Pruning Ornamental Plants in the Landscape (B 961)

    This publication provides guidelines for proper pruning that may help assure healthy vigorous plants and lasting landscape beauty. First, we'll discuss the three basic Ts for successful pruning: tools, technique and timing. Then we'll examine the pruning requirements of specific ornamental plants in the home landscape. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Roses in Georgia: Selecting and Growing Techniques (C 1001)

    Roses are one of the most popular plants among Georgia gardeners even though growing roses in the southern climate can be challenging. Knowing which rose varieties to choose is the key to success. This publication discusses selection and techniques for growing roses in Georgia. Published on Apr 30, 2014.

  • Safety Checklists for New Landscape Employees (B 1415)

    These checklists can be used to introduce new landscape workers to safe work practices. They ensure that job safety training includes safety instruction. Included are sections on general safety precautions, equipment safety, lawn mower safety and pesticide safety. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Safety for Hispanic Landscape Workers cover image Safety for Hispanic Landscape Workers (B 1334)

    Hispanic workers predominate in Georgia's urban agriculture industry, comprising almost three-fourths of the workforce. Employers must ensure comprehension and safety compliance, address language barriers to create a safe workplace, use physical demonstrations, diagrams, bilingual materials and, if available, an interpreter. This publication covers general precautions, equipment safety, pesticide safety and other information that is necessary for keeping employees safe. It is also available in Spanish. Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Selecting and Growing Azaleas cover image Selecting and Growing Azaleas (B 670)

    Azaleas' vivid colors, profusion of flowers and adaptability to a wide range of soils and climates make them one of the most popular flowering shrubs in Georgia. Although most people associate azaleas with spring, there are several that bloom in summer and fall. By carefully selecting plants, you can have azaleas blooming at least eight months of the year. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Shade Trees for Georgia (C 1013)

    Shade trees are a staple of Southern landscapes and include a variety of species, forms and seasonal appeal. In the Southeastern U.S., shade trees are used most often to provide relief from the summer sun and heat. Additionally, shade trees can be utilized to channel summer breezes to desired locations, add monetary value to a property, define outdoor spaces, and improve landscape sustainability by reducing soil erosion, decreasing storm water flows, increasing rainwater infiltration and increasing wildlife habitat.The information in this publication will assist homeowners in making informed decisions when selecting fast growing shade trees for urban and suburban environments. Published on Jan 31, 2015.

  • Shade and Street Tree Care (B 1031)

    With proper care, trees can be valuable commodities around our homes, communities and urban landscapes. Providing care requires understanding tree biology, or how and why trees function. Trees constantly interact with the environment, including changes in soil, light, temperature, moisture, competitors and pests. Humans can produce additional stress by altering environments, but with proper care and maintenance trees can survive and thrive in your landscape. Published on Jul 31, 2014.

  • Simple Tree Training Technique for Peaches (C 878)

    A relatively new peach tree training system is being adopted by some southeastern peach growers; it is an easy, low-maintenance system that can be used even in the home orchard. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Soil Preparation and Planting Procedures for Ornamental Plants in the Landscape (B 932)

    Proper planting is essential for healthy, vigorous growth of ornamental plants in the landscape. It assures rapid plant establishment by providing a favorable environment for the developing root system. This publication offers step-by-step guidelines that will help you achieve planting success. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Southeastern Pecan Growers' Handbook (B 1327)

    Pecan production is considered by many who practice this endeavor to be as much an art as it is a science. Growers must integrate multiple disciplines in order to be successful. This book was created with the goal of being a comprehensive reference text for pecan growers, scientists, and county agents. It addresses pecan culture and management in the southeastern United States. For more information, visit http://www.caes.uga.edu/commodities/fruits/pecan/SPG-handbook.html Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Southern Highbush Blueberry Marketing and Economics (B 1413)

    To be more competitive, Georgia blueberry producers have to increase their yields to match or better the average U.S. values. This increase can occur through an improvement of the agricultural practices and a better mastery of blueberry cultivation. This publication contains information to help Southern Highbush blueberry growers in Georgia maximize their profits. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Spanish Series: Construyendo Huertos Caseros (B 577-SP)

    Un huerto bien administrado y productivo es una delicia. Este puede proveerle a su familia y a usted con una variedad de vegetales nutritivos y saludables que pueden ser disfrutados frescos o en conserva para su utilización en el futuro. El trabajar en un huerto casero también puede ser un pasatiempo gratificante, un proyecto para miembros 4-H y una manera en la cual mejoramos nuestra condición física. Aunque es cierto que podemos comprar en el supermercado vegetales frescos de alta calidad, congelados o enlatados, muchos de nosotros estamos inclinándonos más hacia el cultivo de vegetales en nuestro propio hogar para suplementar los alimentos que compramos en el supermercado.

    [A well-tended, fruitful garden is a delight. It can supply you and your family with a variety
    of nutritious, healthful vegetables to be enjoyed fresh or preserved for later use.
    Gardening can also be a rewarding hobby, a project for 4-H members and a way to improve
    your physical fitness. Although it's true that we can buy quality fresh, frozen or
    canned vegetables in supermarkets, many of us are turning to gardening to supplement
    our store-bought food. This publication explains everything you need to know about growing a successful home vegetable or herb garden.] Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Spanish Series: Enfermedades Más Comunes de Plantas Ornamentales en Georgia (B 1238-SP)

    Esta publicación describe algunas de las enfermedades más problemáticas en las plantas de ornato más usadas en el jardín. El material presentado aquí le ayudará a identificar estas enfermedades y encontrará las recomendaciones para su tratamiento. El conocimiento de estas enfermedades permitirá a los jardineros profesionales y amateurs a combatir estas enfermedades y tener plantas saludables y bellas.

    [This publication describes some of the most troublesome diseases of Georgia's landscape plants. The following material will help you identify these diseases and offers recommendations for treatment. Knowledge about the common diseases of Georgia landscape plants will allow professional and amateur growers alike to better fight plant diseases and produce healthy plants.] Published on May 30, 2015.

  • Spanish Series: La Importancia de Preservar la Biodiversidad en el Paisaje y cómo Podemos Ayudar (B 1451-SP)

    Para preservar la biodiversidad en los paisajes urbanos, las plantas nativas necesitan ser proveídas de una forma que mantiene sus beneficios ecológicos. Al mismo tiempo, las plantas nativas necesitan ser atractivas para los consumidores y económicamente factibles de producir para los viveros. Actualmente hay una disponibilidad limitada de plantas ornamentales nativas que tanto ayudan a la ecología como parecen estéticamente agradables. El aumento de su uso en jardinería requiere satisfacer estas demandas diferentes. Este artículo explica la importancia de las plantas nativas y ofrece información sobre las asociaciones entre los científicos, la industria, y el público en la preservación de la biodiversidad y la salud ecológica los paisajes urbanos.

    [To preserve biodiversity in urban landscapes, native plants need to be included in a way that maintains their ecological benefits. At the same time, native plants need to be attractive to consumers and economically feasible for nurseries to produce. There is currently a limited availability of native ornamental plants that both help the ecology and appear aesthetically pleasing. Increasing their use in landscaping requires satisfying these different demands. This bulletin explains the role of native plants and outlines the partnerships among scientists, industry, and the public in preserving biodiversity and ecological health in the urban environment.] Published on Nov 30, 2015.

  • Seguridad para Trabajadores Hispanos de Jardineria cover image Spanish Series: Seguridad para Trabajadores Hispanos de Jardineria (B 1334-SP)

    Los hispanos representan la minoría más grande de los Estados Unidos con 42.7 millones de habitantes. Los trabajadores hispanos predominan en la industria de la agricultura urbana del estado de Georgia y conforman casi las tres/cuartas partes del total de obreros del estado. Los supervisores deben garantizar la comprensión e implementación de la seguridad laboral. Es imprescindible reconocer las barreras de comunicación para mantener un área de trabajo donde predomine y se haga efectiva la seguridad laboral. Use demostraciones, dibujos, materiales bilingues, y si es posible, un intérprete.

    [Hispanic workers predominate in Georgia's urban agriculture industry, comprising almost three-fourths of the workforce. Employers must ensure comprehension and safety compliance, address language barriers to create a safe workplace, use physical demonstrations, diagrams, bilingual materials and, if available, an interpreter. This publication covers general precautions, equipment safety, pesticide safety and other information that is necessary for keeping employees safe. It is also available in Spanish.] Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Steps in Starting a School Garden (C 1101)

    This publication explains the necessary steps for starting a school garden. To create a sustainable garden, the emphasis is placed on school and community support. Published on Oct 31, 2016.

  • Success with Mixed Containers Using Perennial and Woody Plants (B 1418)

    This publication offers information on types of plants suitable for mixed containers, with an emphasis on perennial and woody species and cultivars, as well as aesthetic qualities, cultural conditions and placement within the container. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Success with Pansies in the Winter Landscape: A Guide for Landscape Professionals (B 1359)

    This publication provides guidelines for the planting and care of pansies to ensure success, including planting time, bed preparation, plant spacing, planting procedures, fertilization, freeze protection, and common insect and disease problems. Since seasonal color is a high-cost investment in the landscape, it is important to get the maximum return on your investment by following these planting and cultural guidelines. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • The Importance of Preserving Biodiversity in the Urban Landscape and How We Can Help (B 1451)

    To preserve biodiversity in urban landscapes, native plants need to be included in a way that maintains their ecological benefits. At the same time, native plants need to be attractive to consumers and economically feasible for nurseries to produce. There is currently a limited availability of native ornamental plants that both help the ecology and appear aesthetically pleasing. Increasing their use in landscaping requires satisfying these different demands.

    This bulletin explains the role of native plants and outlines the partnerships among scientists, industry, and the public in preserving biodiversity and ecological health in the urban environment. Published on Nov 30, 2015.

  • Tips for Saving Water in the Landscape (C 1010)

    Research has shown that a landscape that has been carefully planned and installed and properly managed will be healthier, less prone to insects and diseases, and will require less irrigation. Georgia's landscape and turf industry and UGA Cooperative Extension are urging citizens to implement inexpensive and easy-to-perform landscape management practices that decrease the need for irrigation and/or lead to greater efficiency of irrigation when it is needed. This publication provides tips about planning, planting and maintaining the landscape to save water. Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Top 10 Nursery Production Integrated Pest Management Practices in the Southeast (C 1008)

    Integrated pest management (IPM) is a sustainable approach to managing pests by combining biological, cultural, physical and chemical tools in a way that minimizes economic, health and environmental risks. One hundred and seventy-eight horticultural producers were surveyed in 2009-10 to determine the IPM practices used by growers in the southeastern U.S. Growers were asked a series of questions about monitoring or scouting for pests, prevention practices or interventions used to control pests. Published on Sep 30, 2014.

  • Tree Planting Details (C 989)

    This publication contains information about planting trees and shrubs, and includes AutoCAD files, .jpg images and .pdf files with instructions and images. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Tropical Plants Offer New Possibilities for Georgia Gardens (B 1272)

    The goals of these investigations were to achieve an aesthetically pleasing landscape while experimenting with mixing various plant habits, leaf textures and colors, and even flowers, and to raise consumer awareness, both at industry and public levels, of the alternative uses of tropical plants in the landscape. This publication presents plant performance data collected over a three-year period in trials from two different Georgia environments, a coastal area and a mid-state area. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Troubleshooting Vegetable Production Problems in the Southeast (C 1054)

    This publication is designed for small market growers, homeowners and Master Gardeners in order to be a quick reference guide for diagnosing common problems in vegetables. Published on Aug 30, 2014.

  • Using Surfactants, Wetting Agents, and Adjuvants in the Greenhouse (B 1319)

    Many pesticides require the addition of an adjuvant, and some do not. When applying fungicides, insecticides or herbicides without a recommended adjuvant, 30 percent to 50 percent reduction in pest control can be expected. Adjuvants may cause damage to a plant if the wrong adjuvant is used or if it is used at too high a concentration. Using the correct adjuvant on a greenhouse crop is a critical decision. This bulletin is intended to describe how adjuvants differ and what adjuvants are best to use. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Vegetable Gardening in Georgia cover image Vegetable Gardening in Georgia (C 963)

    When space is limited, a plentiful supply of crops such as tomatoes, peppers, eggplant and okra can be grown with a few properly cared-for plants. Published on Apr 30, 2015.

  • Water-wise Landscape Guide for the Georgia Piedmont (B 1444)

    Do you want a landscape that is beautiful, saves you time, effort and money and uses less water? If you do, a water-wise landscape is for you. Water-wise landscapes are designed, organized, and maintained by practices that use water strategically and wisely. Follow the seven basic steps outlined in this guide to create a beautiful water-wise yard or home garden. Published on Jul 2, 2015.

  • Weed Wizard Series: Controlling Florida Betony in the Landscape (C 867-11)

    Florida betony is a “winter” perennial and has a square stem with opposite leaves. Florida betony (also called rattlesnake weed and hedge nettle) is a problem weed in both turfgrasses and ornamentals. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • Weed Wizard Series: Controlling Greenbrier (C 867-2)

    Greenbrier (Smilax spp.) is a difficult vine to control in the landscape. Also known as Catbrier, Cat Sawbrier and Sarsaparillavine, once this climbing vine develops an extensive underground rhizome tuber system, it is difficult to control. This publication describes successful control methods. Published on May 30, 2014.

  • Weed Wizard Series: Controlling Poison Ivy in the Landscape (C 867-10)

    Poison ivy (Rhus radicans) is a common poisonous plant in Georgia. Its preferred habitat is moist, deciduous forests and wooded areas; however, it is also found in pastures, fence rows, ornamental plantings and various types of noncropland areas. Every person who works outdoors with plants or participates in hiking, camping or other outdoor activities should be able to identify poison ivy. Failure to do so can lead to severe allergic reactions. Published on Apr 30, 2015.

  • Weed Wizard Series: Weed Control in Iris (C 867-8)

    With their beautiful flowers, irises are coveted as one of the finest herbaceous perennials. Unfortunately, like most garden plants, weed control in irises can be difficult. Established perennial broadleaf weeds can be extremely difficult to control, requiring special removal techniques. Fortunately, many annual broadleaf and grassy weeds can be easily controlled with mulches and the judicious
    use of herbicides. Published on Sep 30, 2014.

  • Weights and Processed Yields of Fruits and Vegetables (C 780)

    Marketing fresh fruits and vegetables at farmers markets, roadside markets, and pick-your-own farms is an important and growing method of marketing. However, many of the containers used are not practical for consumers. Published on Feb 28, 2014.

  • When to Harvest Vegetables (C 935)

    This circular gives suggestions for determining the proper stage of maturity for harvesting many vegetables. Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Winter Protection of Ornamental Plants cover image Winter Protection of Ornamental Plants (C 872)

    Cold damage to ornamental plants can be a problem during the winter in the Georgia landscape. Regardless of where you live, recommended practices can maximize the chances that your prized landscape plants will survive the winter. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Winterizing Motorized Garden Equipment (C 1073)

    Nothing is more frustrating than pulling your lawn mower or tiller out of the shed from a long winter's nap and not being able to get it to crank. Often, this is the result of improper winterization of equipment. Here is a quick guide on how to properly store small engines longterm, so they will be ready to fire up and perform the next time they are needed. Also covered is how to tell if you have a fuel issue. A checklist for winterizing tools is also included. By following these maintenance steps, your motor will be prepared for long-term storage. Published on Nov 30, 2015.

Unavailable Publications

The following publications are under review and are not currently available. Contact the author(s) or publications editors for more information.