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Publications on Fruit

24 publications were found.

  • Cane Blight of Blackberry (C 894)

    Cane blight can be a major disease of blackberry in the Southeast, resulting in severe losses. The wet, humid conditions observed in Georgia and other southeastern states allow for significant losses following pruning or other injuries to the primocane. Published on Apr 30, 2014.

  • Citrus Fruit for Southern and Coastal Georgia (B 804)

    Citrus plants are very versatile around the home and may be used as individual specimens, hedges or container plants. Their natural beauty and ripe fruits make them attractive additions to the South Georgia home scene. Cold-hardy varieties that receive recommended care may grow successfully in the coastal and extreme southern areas of the state (and to a lesser degree in more northern locations). Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Growing Fruits (C 1027-10)

    Community gardens designed to provide locally grown food for families can be used to grow fruits in addition to the more commonly grown vegetables. There are many common and lesser-known fruits that are suited for planting in community garden situations. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Less Expensive Sources of Plant Material, Amendments and Tools (C 1027-6)

    This publication offers advice on finding less expensive sources of plant material, amendments and tools for community and school gardens. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Community and School Gardens Series: Planning an Edible Garden (C 1027-1)

    This publication describes three steps for planning a school garden: garden location, soil and terrain, and choosing crops. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Diagnostic Guide to Common Home Orchard Diseases cover image Diagnostic Guide to Common Home Orchard Diseases (B 1336)

    This publication is intended to be used as a pictorial diagnostic guide to identify the most common diseases seen on fruits grown in home landscapes, gardens, and/or orchards in Georgia. Use this guide as a supplemental resource and/or reference to the Homeowner Edition of the Georgia Pest Management Handbook. Published on May 30, 2015.

  • Fall Gardening: A Collection of Information and Resources (AP 105)

    This publication is an annually-updated guide to fall gardening information and resources for Georgia. Topics include planting tall fescue lawns, soil bag flower beds, planting pansies like the pros, planting collards, turnips and cabbage, planting a home fruit orchard, mulching with leaves, gardening chores, cleaning and storing garden tools, treating for fire ants, and additional resources. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • Home Fruit Orchard Pruning Techniques cover image Home Fruit Orchard Pruning Techniques (C 1087)

    This circular is a compilation of pruning techniques for apple, pear, peach, blackberry, blueberry, grapes, and pomegranate. Included are tools for pruning, definitions and descriptions of terms used in pruning, and diagrams illustrating best pruning practices. This work has important and relevant information about pruning and plant care for the home orchardist. Published on Aug 31, 2016.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Apples (C 740)

    Apples are adapted to most areas of Georgia. Although the northern half of the state is best suited for the more "conventional" apple varieties, you can have success in the southern half of Georgia with adapted varieties. Published on Apr 30, 2014.

  • Home Garden Blueberries cover image Home Garden Series: Home Garden Blueberries (C 946)

    Under good management, the native Georgia rabbiteye blueberry bushes will produce some fruit the second or third year after transplanting. By the sixth year they will yield as much as 2 gallons each and continue to increase as the plants get larger. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Bunch Grapes (B 807)

    Bunch grapes are often called “pod” grapes in rural Georgia since they produce large clusters of fruit. Georgia’s climate is not well-suited to home garden production of European bunch grapes, but American bunch grapes and hybrids between the two species (French hybrids) grow well in Georgia. If grapes are well cared for and sprayed when diseases and insects threaten, you can expect yields of 20 to 30 pounds of fruit per vine. Published on Apr 30, 2014.

  • Home Garden Figs cover image Home Garden Series: Home Garden Figs (C 945)

    Most people are fond of figs. They are tasty and can be eaten fresh, preserved, or used for baking and making desserts. Figs will do well in most parts of Georgia except the mountainous areas. Published on Apr 30, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Muscadines (C 949)

    Muscadines are truly a fruit for the south. Although muscadines can be grown successfully in most parts of the state, they are best adapted to the Piedmont and Coastal Plain areas. Published on Apr 30, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Peaches (C 1063)

    Growing peaches and other fruit trees in Georgia and the southeastern United States is challenging. Peaches are not native to North America; however, many cultivars have been developed for our area, and Georgia has a long history of successful peach production. One must choose the site and the proper cultivar and provide care throughout the year to be successful.

    This publication includes information for peaches on site selection and preparation, planting, fertilizing, insects, diseases, and harvesting. Recommended varieties for Georgia are also listed. Published on Feb 11, 2015.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Pears (C 742)

    Pears are adapted to nearly all of Georgia. It is not uncommon to find trees as much as 50 years old that are still producing fruit. Published on Apr 30, 2014.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Persimmons (C 784)

    Many of the numerous species of persimmon can be grown in Georgia. Our native persimmon, Diospyros virginiana, is found from Florida north to Connecticut, west to Iowa and south to Texas. This publication covers planting and growing requirements as well as fruiting, harvesting, and insect pest information. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Raspberries and Blackberries (C 766)

    Blackberries and raspberries are one of the most popular fruits to grow and they are among the easiest for the home gardener to successfully produce. Blackberries and raspberries come as erect types (no trellis required) and trailing types (trellis required), depending on the varieties selected. This publication discusses growing raspberries and blackberries in a home garden. Published on Jul 31, 2016.

  • Home Garden Series: Home Garden Strawberries (C 883)

    Strawberry beds need a small area that receives full sun most or all day to get started. Strawberries will grow well in many types of soil, but the most desirable soil is fertile, medium-light in texture, well drained and with good moisture-holding capacity. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Home Garden Watermelon cover image Home Garden Series: Home Garden Watermelon (C 1035)

    This publication discusses growing watermelon in the home garden, including transplanting, starting seeds, soil preparation, culture and fertilization, harvesting, storage and use, and problems. It also includes a list of recommended varieties for Georgia. Published on Sep 30, 2016.

  • Home Garden Series: Plums for Georgia Home Gardens (C 881)

    Plums are not only popular for cooking and jam making, they’re enjoyed fresh as well. The sweeter varieties are among the more delicious dessert fruits. Published on Apr 30, 2014.

  • Minor Fruits and Nuts in Georgia (B 992)

    Many types of fruits and nuts can be grown in Georgia due to our mild climate. This publication provides an outline of the culture and management of the exotic and uncommon fruits and nuts that can be grown in Georgia. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Planting Your Bare-Root Fruit Tree (C 1061)

    Many fruit trees are purchased as bare-root trees. A bare-root tree is a dormant tree that has no soil or planting medium around the roots. Here are some tips on storing, planting, and caring for your bare-root fruit tree. Published on Dec 31, 2014.

  • Propagating Deciduous Fruit Plants Common to Georgia (B 818)

    Deciduous fruit plants common to Georgia must be propagated asexually because they do not come true to seed. This makes it necessary to reproduce the desired fruit plants by methods such as cuttings, runners, layering, budding or grafting. This publication discusses the common techniques used to asexually propagate fruit plants adapted to Georgia. Published on Feb 28, 2015.

  • Troubleshooting Cultural Problems in Tomatoes cover image Troubleshooting Cultural Problems in Tomatoes (C 1089)

    This publication is intended for general use audiences, including homeowners, civic groups, and master gardeners. It covers the basic troubleshooting procedures for solving common problems while growing tomatoes. It includes a description of both cultural and physiological problems and solutions. Published on Jul 31, 2016.