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Publications on Forage

36 publications were found.

  • 1999 Soybean, Sorghum Grain and Silage, Grain Millet, and Summer Annual Forages Performance Tests (RR 663)

    This research report presents the results of the 1999 statewide performance tests of soybean, sorghum grain and silage, grain millet, and summer annual forages. The tests for various evaluations were conducted at several or all of the following locations: Tifton, Plains, and Midville in the Coastal Plain region; Griffin and Athens in the Piedmont region; Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region; and Quincy and Marianna, Florida. Published on Mar 30, 2096.

  • 2000 Soybean, Sorghum Grain and Silage, Grain Millet, Sunflower, and Summer Annual Forages Performance Tests (RR 670)

    This research report presents the results of the 2000 statewide performance tests of soybean, sorghum grain and silage, grain millet, sunflower, and summer annual forages. Published on Mar 30, 2096.

  • 2009 Soybean, Sorghum Grain and Silage, Summer Annual Forages and Sunflower Performance Tests (AP 103)

    This publication presents the results of the 2009 statewide performance tests of soybean, sorghum grain and silage, sunflower and summer annual forages. The tests for various evaluations were conducted at several or all of the following locations: Tifton, Plains and Midville in the Coastal Plain region; Griffin and Athens in the Piedmont region; and Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • 2010 Soybean, Sorghum Grain and Silage, Summer Annual Forages, and Sunflower Performance Tests (AP 103-2)

    This research report presents the results of the 2010 statewide performance tests of soybean, sorghum grain and silage, sunflower and summer annual forages. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • 2010-2011 Georgia Small Grain Performance Tests (AP 100-3)

    Results of the 2010-2011 performance tests of small grains grown for grain and forage are printed in this research report. Grain evaluation studies were conducted at five locations in Georgia, including Tifton, Plains and Midville in the Coastal Plain region, Griffin in the Piedmont region, Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region and at Quincy, Florida. Small grain forage evaluation tests were conducted at four locations in Georgia, which included Tifton and Plains in the Coastal Plain, Griffin in the Piedmont and Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region, and at Marianna, Florida. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • 2011 Soybean, Sorghum Grain and Silage, and Summer Annual Forages Performance Tests (AP 103-3)

    This research report presents the results of the 2011 statewide performance tests of soybean, sorghum grain and silage, and summer annual forages. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • 2011-2012 Georgia Small Grains Performance Tests (AP 100-4)

    Results of the 2011-2012 performance tests of small grains grown for grain and forage are printed in this research report. Grain evaluation studies were conducted at five locations in Georgia, including Tifton, Plains and Midville in the Coastal Plain
    region, Griffin in the Piedmont region and Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region. Small grain forage evaluation tests were conducted at four locations in Georgia, which included Tifton and Plains in the Coastal Plain region, Griffin in the Piedmont region and Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region, and at Marianna, Florida. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • 2012 Soybean, Sorghum Grain and Silage, and Summer Annual Forages Performance Tests (AP 103-4)

    This report contains the results of the 2012 soybean, sorghum grain and silage, and summer annual forages performance tests. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • 2013 Soybean, Sorghum Grain and Silage, and Summer Annual Forages Performance Tests (AP 103-5)

    This research report presents the results of the 2013 statewide performance tests of soybean, sorghum grain and silage, and summer annual forages. The tests for various evaluations were conducted at several or all of the following locations: Tifton, Plains and Midville in the Coastal Plain region; Griffin and Athens in the Piedmont region; and Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • 2014 Soybean, Sorghum Grain and Silage, and Summer Annual Forages Performance Tests (AP 103-6)

    This research report presents the results of the 2014 statewide performance tests of soybean, sorghum grain and silage, and summer annual forages. The tests for various evaluations were conducted at several or all of the following locations: Tifton, Plains and Midville in the Coastal Plain region; Griffin and Athens in the Piedmont region; and Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • Alfalfa Management in Georgia (B 1350)

    Alfalfa is a high-yielding, perennial legume that is well-suited to hay, silage, or pasture production. Alfalfa is known as the “Queen of Forages” because it produces an excellent quality, high-protein forage. These properties make alfalfa one of the most widely-grown crops in the world. Published on Jan 31, 2015.

  • Annual Ryegrass Control in Georgia Hayfields (C 1078)

    Annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), also referred to as Italian ryegrass, is the most problematic winter annual weed in Georgia hayfields. Seed germinates from September to November when soil temperatures drop below 70 degrees F. Seedlings mature in the fall, overwinter in a vegetative state, and resume active growth in the spring. Annual ryegrass is a prolific seed producer that contributes to annual infestations.

    This publication summarizes the growth and identification of this weed. Cultural and chemical control options are also presented for tall fescue, bermudagrass, alfalfa, bahiagrass and other forage legumes grown for hay production. Published on Dec 30, 2016.

  • Bermudagrass in Georgia (B 911)

    Bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.) is an important warm-season, perennial, sod-forming forage grass in Georgia and throughout the Southeast. Bermudagrass is productive from spring until fall and is well-suited for grazing or hay production. Several varieties of bermudagrass are used in Georgia, ranging from common bermudagrass to the high-yielding, good quality hybrid bermudagrasses. The best variety to use depends on your location in the state and the intended use. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Blister Beetles in Georgia Alfalfa Hay (C 917)

    Blister beetles sometimes infest forage crops such as alfalfa, where they may become incorporated in hay. This publication discusses biology, cause of illness and management of blister beetles. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Common Terms Used in Animal Feeding and Nutrition cover image Common Terms Used in Animal Feeding and Nutrition (B 1367)

    The purpose of this publication is to serve as an educational
    reference and resource to those who are interested
    in animal feeding and nutrition. Our primary objective
    is to list the common terms used when discussing animal feeding. This listing will also be helpful when reading articles on animal feeding and nutrition, feed analysis reports or tags associated with feeds sold in the market. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Feeding Drought-Damaged Cotton and Peanut Crops to Beef Cattle (SB 55)

    Beef cattle producers can use abandoned cotton and peanut crops as an economic means of nutrient supplementation for beef cattle. By using these abandoned crops, cattlemen can reduce feed costs and/or extend the grazing period and perhaps allow pastures to regenerate if adequate rainfall is received. This publication contains information about feeding drought-damaged cotton and peanut crops to beef cattle. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Forage Systems for Horses in Georgia (B 1224)

    A good pasture and forage program can provide quality feed and normally will be the most efficient and economical means of providing a substantial part of equine rations. In Georgia, we are fortunate to have a mild climate, soils suitable for producing forages and a good selection of highly productive forage species. With careful planning and good management, adequate grazing can be supplied for up to 10 months of the year in most areas of the state. To many producers, the term "horse pasture" denotes grazing management and forage crops unique to horses. This is not the case at all. Because the horse is a herbivore, most forage crops commonly used for cattle can also be used to provide grazing for horses. Published on Jan 31, 2017.

  • Forage Systems for Stocker Cattle (B 1392)

    This publication provides a guide to the various forage systems that could be used for stocker development and provides guidelines for managing grazing or hay harvests for optimum forage yield and quality. Published on Sep 30, 2014.

  • Forage Use and Grazing Herd Management during a Drought (C 914)

    This brief management guideline provides producers with specific management tactics that may minimize the potential for short- and long-term problems. These tactics, categorized in order of early, advanced, and severe drought stages, are based on specific characteristics including water loss, forage growth, and rainfall. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Georgia 2015 Soybean, Sorghum Grain and Silage, and Summer Annual Forages Performance Tests (AP 103-7)

    This research report presents the results of the 2015 statewide performance tests of soybean, sorghum grain and silage, and summer annual forages. The tests for various evaluations were conducted at several or all of the following locations: Tifton, Plains, and Midville in the Coastal Plain region; Griffin and Athens in the Piedmont region; and Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region.

    The University of Georgia soybean variety trials are irrigated. In addition, dryland soybean variety trials were conducted at four locations (Midville, Plains, Tifton, and Griffin), and irrigated, ultra-late planted soybean variety trials were conducted at Midville and Attapulgus. All are included in this report.

    Agronomic information, such as plant height, lodging, disease occurrence, etc., is listed along with the yield data. Information concerning planting and harvest dates, soil type, and culture and fertilization practices used in each trial is included in footnotes. Since the average yield for several years gives a better indication of a variety's potential than one year's data, multiple-year yield summaries have been included. Published on Jul 1, 2997.

  • Georgia 2016 Soybean, Sorghum Grain and Silage, and Summer Annual Forages Performance Tests (AP 103-8)

    This research report presents the results of the 2016 statewide performance tests of soybean, sorghum grain and silage, and summer annual forages. The tests for various evaluations were conducted at several or all of the following locations: Tifton, Plains, and Midville in the Coastal Plain region; Griffin and Athens in the Piedmont region; and Calhoun in the Limestone Valley region.

    The University of Georgia soybean variety trials are irrigated. In addition, dryland soybean variety trials were conducted at four locations (Midville, Plains, Tifton, and Griffin), and irrigated, ultra-late planted soybean variety trials were conducted at Midville and Attapulgus. All are included in this report.

    Agronomic information, such as plant height, lodging, and disease occurrence, is listed along with the yield data. Information concerning planting and harvest dates, soil type, and culture and fertilization practices used in each trial is included in footnotes. Since the average yield for several years gives a better indication of a variety's potential than one year's data, multiple-year yield summaries have been included. Published on Mar 23, 2096.

  • Georgia Forages: Grass Species (B 1351)

    The geographic and environmental diversity of Georgia allows for the extensive use of both cool and warm season grass species. In general, cool season grass species provide higher nutritional quality than warm season grasses. In contrast, warm season grasses generally yield more than cool season grasses. Each type and species, however, offers its own unique qualities and benefits to the forage system. In this section, the most important grass species in Georgia are introduced and discussed. Published on Jan 31, 2015.

  • Georgia Forages: Legume Species (B 1347)

    Legume species add significantly to forage systems in Georgia. They are an excellent source of high quality forage, and are generally very digestible and contain high levels of crude protein (CP). Many legumes also provide substantial forage yields. Perhaps most importantly, legumes and the rhizobium bacteria that colonize nodules on their roots provide an important source of biologically-fixed nitrogen (N). This publication presents information about the most important legume species grown for forage in Georgia. Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Grazing Impacts on Pasture Composition (B 1243)

    Much attention has been placed on the potential negative environmental impacts of grazing; however, grazing can be a powerful tool for improving pasture health and productivity. Grazing diminishes the competitive ability of plants like broomsedge and johnsongrass and improves the competitiveness of bermudagrass, bahiagrass and even clovers. Improper grazing, on the other hand, can decrease the competitiveness of desirable species like orchardgrass or switchgrass and encourage undesirable weedy species. Published on Jan 31, 2017.

  • Leafspot Diagnosis and Management in Bermudagrass Forages (C 887)

    Bermudagrass leafspot is a disease that decreases yields, nutritive value and palatability. This publication discusses leafspot diagnosis and management in bermudagrass. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Nitrate Toxicity (C 915)

    This publication summarizes the effect that high nitrates have on the animal, presents the conditions to expect in toxic concentrations of nitrates, and outlines strategies that could prevent or reduce the risk of nitrate toxicity. Published on Jul 31, 2016.

  • Novel Endophyte-Infected Tall Fescue (C 861)

    This publication outlines plant persistence and animal performance characteristics of novel endophyte-infected tall fescue and provides recommended pasture renovation practices. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Planting Guide to Grasses and Legumes for Forage and Wildlife in Georgia (C 814)

    This planting guide will help producers establish grasses and legumes commonly grown for forage and wildlife in Georgia. Published on Apr 30, 2017.

  • Production Costs vs. Feeding Value of Forages (C 1020)

    Determining an equitable price for purchased forages is a necessary but often uncomfortable topic of discussion for feed growers and purchasers. Usually this discussion is in the context of corn silage; however, the same principles can be used in any discussion involving hay, baleage or grains. In order for an input market to be efficient, the price agreed upon by both buyers and sellers should adequately compensate the producer while still allowing the purchaser the opportunity to economically use the input. Published on May 31, 2014.

  • Selecting a Forage Bermudagrass Variety (C 919)

    This publication shares the collective experience of research and extension personnel on bermudagrass cultivars that are (or could be) grown in Georgia. Published on Sep 30, 2016.

  • Selenium in Georgia Soils and Forages: Importance in the Livestock Industry (B 1390)

    This publication highlights the role of selenium in animal nutrition; selenium concentration and distribution in soils and feedstuffs (grains and forages) produced in various parts of the United States and in Georgia; disorders resulting from Selenium deficiency or toxicity; various methods of selenium supplementation; and recommendations for selenium management in Georgia. This publication is intended to serve as an educational resource for university researchers and Extension specialists, county Extension agents and livestock, forage and feed producers, among others. Published on Aug 31, 2014.

  • Soil and Fertilizer Management Considerations for Forage Systems in Georgia (B 1346)

    Georgia possesses diverse soil conditions and many forage production factors are influenced by this diversity. As a result, the soil environment of a given site must be considered when selecting forage species, determining fertilization strategies and planning forage utilization systems. This article guides forage producers through the process of exploring their soil's characteristics and sampling the soil in pastures and hayfields for testing, and provides information about specific nutrients and soil amendments relative to forage production practices. Recommendations are also made on how to minimize the economic and environmental risks associated with the addition of nutrients to pasture and hayfields. Published on Nov 30, 2014.

  • Stockpiling Tall Fescue for Fall and Winter Grazing (C 920)

    Producing and/or purchasing hay to feed livestock through the winter represents a substantial expense. This publication details strategies and considerations when stockpiling and utilizing tall fescue. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • The Management and Use of Bahiagrass (B 1362)

    Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) is a long-lived, perennial warm season grass that is grown extensively in the southeastern United States. It is most commonly used as a pasture species, but can be used for hay production, erosion control, and wildlife habitat. Bahiagrass can also be used in "sod-based rotation" sequences that have been found to suppress pest problems (nematode and disease issues) in crops such as peanuts. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • Understanding and Improving Forage Quality (B 1425)

    The goal of this publication is to guide the user to a better understanding of basic forage quality terms and to recommend management changes that will improve forage quality. To that end, our objectives are to explain how forage quality is measured, describe how to interpret a forage analysis, present the effects of management on forage quality, and list the key management strategies that can increase the nutritive value of forage crops. Published on Mar 31, 2017.

  • White Clover Establishment and Management Guide cover image White Clover Establishment and Management Guide (B 1251)

    White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a cool season perennial legume of Mediterranean origin. White
    clover has been used as a forage in North America since Colonial times. Benjamin Franklin noted its
    prevalence in cleared and disturbed land as early as 1746. There are many animal and agronomic related reasons for establishing a productive stand of white clover in existing grass pastures. This publication covers tips on selecting, establishing and managing white clover to help ensure a productive stand. Published on Mar 30, 2016.