Organic food production is one of the fastest-growing sectors of the American food marketplace and is driven largely by personal health preferences and environmental ethics. Organic food sales in the United States rose from $13 billion in 2005 to $35 billion in 2014. Organic farmers are required to follow an ecological soil management program and are restricted in their use of chemicals. In order for a crop to be marketed as organic, it must obtain organic certification and maintain records of the production practices in use on the farm. See the USDA's organic certification information at the following website: https://www.usda.gov/topics/organic. A three-year transition period is required before the crop can be sold as “organic” and use the USDA certified-organic seal. Pecan production generates unique challenges to organic production methods in the humid Southeastern U.S. because it is an environment conducive to heavy pressure from insects, diseases, and weeds. Therefore, the foundation of any organic pecan production program in the Southeastern U.S. will be based on selection for pest-resistant cultivars.


Status and Revision History
Published on Jul 03, 2018

Faculty
Lenny Wells Associate Professor; Areas of Interest: Pecans, Horticulture Patrick J. Conner Professor; Areas of Interest: Pecan breeding, Horticulture William G. Hudson Professor - Extension Entomologist, Entomology Jason H. Brock Plant Disease Diagnostician - Row Crops and Commercial Vegetables, Plant Pathology
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