Bee Pollination of Georgia Crop Plants (B 1106) University of Georgia Extension Among insect pollinators, bees are especially efficient because they eat pollen and nectar exclusively, visit many flowers of the same species during a single trip, and have hairy bodies that easily pick up pollen grains. In many parts of the country, fruit and vegetable growers are concerned about declining numbers of wild bees. Human activities destroy bee habitat and forage. In short, growers are receiving less "free" pollination from wild bees and increasingly they must make up for this by renting managed honey bee hives during bloom periods. 2016-11-07 10:38:58.017 2006-06-02 14:27:18.0 Bee Pollination of Georgia Crop Plants | Publications | UGA Extension Skip to content

Bee Pollination of Georgia Crop Plants (B 1106)

Summary

Among insect pollinators, bees are especially efficient because they eat pollen and nectar exclusively, visit many flowers of the same species during a single trip, and have hairy bodies that easily pick up pollen grains. In many parts of the country, fruit and vegetable growers are concerned about declining numbers of wild bees. Human activities destroy bee habitat and forage. In short, growers are receiving less "free" pollination from wild bees and increasingly they must make up for this by renting managed honey bee hives during bloom periods.

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Status and Revision History
Published on Jul 1, 1994
In review for minor revisions as of Mar 12, 2009
Re-published with minor revisions on Mar 12, 2010
Reviewed on Mar 1, 2013
Expired on Feb 28, 2017