Extension

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Extension Publications
  • European Gypsy Moth Update for Georgia and the Southeast (B 1492) Currently, European gypsy moth is one of the top quarantine species in the United States. Thanks to the efforts of the U.S. Forest Service and other organizations, such as the Slow the Spread Foundation, the spread of European gypsy moth has slowed dramatically and has yet to become established in Georgia. However, residents and commercial landscape/nursery persons should continually monitor for the pest. This review is intended to provide an introduction to European gypsy moth for residents and green industry professionals in the Southeast. It provides information on European gypsy moth identification, life cycle, means of spread, methods of control, and what can be expected in the Southeast if/when the insect arrives and becomes established.
  • Considerations for the Small Market Producer (C 1090) This publication is intended for general use audiences, including farmers and those considering entering small market vegetable production. It covers the many things to consider before jumping into this venture, including planning, marketing, liability and taxes.
  • Aerating Grain in Storage (B 712) Aeration conditions grain and seed by lowering the temperature of the material and equalizing the temperature within the storage structure. This prevents moisture migration and condensation and can reduce losses during storage.
  • Greenhouses: Heating, Cooling and Ventilation (B 792) This publication contains comprehensive, in-depth information about heating, cooling and ventilating greenhouses.
  • Propagating Deciduous Fruit Plants Common to Georgia (B 818) Deciduous fruit plants common to Georgia must be propagated asexually because they do not come true to seed. This makes it necessary to reproduce the desired fruit plants by methods such as cuttings, runners, layering, budding or grafting. This publication discusses the common techniques used to asexually propagate fruit plants adapted to Georgia.
  • Hobby Greenhouses (B 910) The gardener who has a greenhouse can extend or intermingle the seasons at will. Whether you wish to build your own greenhouse from scratch or purchase a prefabricated structure ready for assembly, this publication explains everything you need to know about building and maintaining a hobby greenhouse. This publication also includes several building design plans.
  • Basic Principles of Pruning Woody Plants (B 949) Pruning is one of the most important cultural practices for maintaining woody plants, including ornamental trees and shrubs, fruits and nuts. Proper pruning requires a basic understanding of how plants respond to various pruning cuts. The principles and guidelines in this publication will help you master common pruning techniques.
  • Flowering Annuals for Georgia Gardens (B 954) Annuals are the mainstay color plant of many home gardens. They are also used in increasingly large numbers in commercial and municipal landscapes because they provide landscape color in a very short time with minimal investment. Properly cared for, many annuals will brighten the landscape continuously from spring until frost kills them in the fall.
  • Weed Control in Home Lawns (B 978) Weeds can be major pests of home lawns. Due to differences in color, leaf size, shape and growth habit, weeds detract from the natural beauty of desirable turfgrasses. Additionally, weeds compete with turfgrasses for sunlight, soil moisture, nutrients and space. Many weeds can quickly become the dominant species in a lawn. This publication contains comprehensive information about weed control in home lawns.
  • Minor Fruits and Nuts in Georgia (B 992) Many types of fruits and nuts can be grown in Georgia due to our mild climate. This publication provides an outline of the culture and management of the exotic and uncommon fruits and nuts that can be grown in Georgia.
  • Shade and Street Tree Care (B 1031) With proper care, trees can be valuable commodities around our homes, communities and urban landscapes. Providing care requires understanding tree biology, or how and why trees function. Trees constantly interact with the environment, including changes in soil, light, temperature, moisture, competitors and pests. Humans can produce additional stress by altering environments, but with proper care and maintenance trees can survive and thrive in your landscape.
  • Millipedes and Centipedes (B 1088) Millipedes and centipedes do not carry diseases that affect people, animals or plants. Millipedes do occasionally damage seedlings by feeding on stems and leaves, and may enter homes in large numbers during periods of migration and become a considerable nuisance. They do not cause damage inside the home, although they may leave a stain if they are crushed. Centipedes, which have poison glands and can bite, pose an occasional threat to humans.
  • Control of Lace Bugs on Ornamental Plants (B 1102) Lace bug damage to the foliage of trees and shrubs detracts greatly from the plants' beauty, reduces the plants' ability to produce food, reduces the plants' vigor ad causes the plant to be more susceptible to damage by other insects, diseases or unfavorable weather conditions. Repeated, heavy infestations of lace bugs may be the primary cause of plant death.
  • Regulations for On-Farm Storage Tanks in Georgia (B 1136) This publication provides a brief overview of the major regulatory agencies and highlights the rules that Georgia farmers should be aware of concerning storage tanks on their farms.
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