UGA Extension Office

Agriculture & Natural Resources

Garden Expo 2018
Extension News
Irrigation Maintenance link Proper irrigation maintenance helps farmers avoid system malfunctions during the growing season. By Clint Thompson | Published: 2/20/2018
Pest Management Field Day link University of Georgia blueberry research will be on display at a field day in Alma next week By Clint Thompson, Cristina deRevere | Published: 2/15/2018
Flower Gardens link Growing cut flowers at home is possible with the right knowledge. By Clint Thompson, Cristina deRevere, Paul A. Thomas | Published: 2/15/2018
Conservation Innovation Grant link The grant supports UGA CAES research on the Tifton campus through July 2020. By Clint Thompson, Cristina deRevere, Paul A. Thomas, Clint Thompson | Published: 2/15/2018
Seed Shopping link Add some unique vegetables to your spring garden by ordering through a seed catalog. By Clint Thompson, Cristina deRevere, Paul A. Thomas, Clint Thompson, Alicia Holloway | Published: 2/15/2018
Cowpea Curculio link UGA entomologist David Riley compares cowpea curculio's effect on peas to the boll weevil's impact on cotton. By Clint Thompson, Cristina deRevere, Paul A. Thomas, Clint Thompson, Alicia Holloway, Julie Jernigan | Published: 2/9/2018
Homegrown Roses link Valentine's Day By Clint Thompson, Cristina deRevere, Paul A. Thomas, Clint Thompson, Alicia Holloway, Julie Jernigan, Sharon Dowdy | Published: 2/8/2018
Blueberry Disease link Lime sulfur can reduce the amount of inoculum carried over from one growing season to the next. By Clint Thompson, Cristina deRevere, Paul A. Thomas, Clint Thompson, Alicia Holloway, Julie Jernigan, Sharon Dowdy, Clint Thompson | Published: 2/7/2018
Peach Crop link Chilly temps bring hope to Georgia's peach farmers. By Clint Thompson, Cristina deRevere, Paul A. Thomas, Clint Thompson, Alicia Holloway, Julie Jernigan, Sharon Dowdy, Clint Thompson, Merritt Melancon | Published: 2/1/2018
Ag Forecast link Georgia Ag Forecast meetings will continue next week with stops in Macon, Cartersville and Athens. By Clint Thompson, Cristina deRevere, Paul A. Thomas, Clint Thompson, Alicia Holloway, Julie Jernigan, Sharon Dowdy, Clint Thompson, Merritt Melancon, Clint Thompson | Published: 2/1/2018
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Extension Publications
  • Native Plants for Georgia Part I: Trees, Shrubs and Woody Vines (B 987) This publication focuses on native trees, shrubs and woody vines for Georgia. It is not our intent to describe all native species — just those available in the nursery trade and those that the authors feel have potential for nursery production and landscape use. Rare or endangered species are not described. Information on each plant is provided according to the following categories: Common Name(s)/Botanical Name/Family, Characteristics, Landscape Uses, Size, Zones and Habitat.
  • Conversion Tables, Formulas and Suggested Guidelines for Horticultural Use (B 931) Pesticide and fertilizer recommendations are often made on a pounds per acre and tons per acre basis. While these may be applicable to field production of many crops, orchardists, nurserymen and greenhouse operators often must convert these recommendations to smaller areas, such as row feet, square feet, or even per tree or per pot. Thus pints, cups, ounces, tablespoons and teaspoons are the common units of measure. The conversion is frequently complicated by metric units of measure. This publication is designed to aid growers in making these calculations and conversions, and also provides other data useful in the management, planning and operation of horticultural enterprises.
  • Vegetable Garden Calendar (C 943) The recommendations in this circular are based on long-term average dates of the last killing frost in the spring and first killing frost in the fall. Every year does not conform to the "average," so you should use your own judgment about advancing or delaying the time for each job, depending on weather conditions.
  • Commercial Tomato Production Handbook (B 1312) This publication is a joint effort of the seven disciplines that comprise the Georgia Vegetable Team. It is comprised of 14 topics on tomato, including history of tomato production, cultural practices, pest management, harvesting, handling and marketing. This publication provides information that will assist producers in improving the profitability of tomato production, whether they are new or experienced producers.
  • Key to Diseases of Oaks in the Landscape (B 1286) This publication contains a guide to diseases of oak trees in the landscape.
  • Weights and Processed Yields of Fruits and Vegetables (C 780) Marketing fresh fruits and vegetables at farmers markets, roadside markets, and pick-your-own farms is an important and growing method of marketing. However, many of the containers used are not practical for consumers.
  • Millipedes and Centipedes (B 1088) Millipedes and centipedes do not carry diseases that affect people, animals or plants. Millipedes do occasionally damage seedlings by feeding on stems and leaves, and may enter homes in large numbers during periods of migration and become a considerable nuisance. They do not cause damage inside the home, although they may leave a stain if they are crushed. Centipedes, which have poison glands and can bite, pose an occasional threat to humans.
  • Landscape Plants for Georgia (B 625) This publication includes a list of good plants for Georgia organized into various sizes and groups. The design qualities of plants—their form, size, color and texture—are emphasized according to the principles and requirements of good landscape design and plant maintenance. Hardiness and disease and insect resistant qualities are also considered.
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Extension Publications
  • Key to Diseases of Oaks in the Landscape (B 1286) This publication contains a guide to diseases of oak trees in the landscape.
  • Millipedes and Centipedes (B 1088) Millipedes and centipedes do not carry diseases that affect people, animals or plants. Millipedes do occasionally damage seedlings by feeding on stems and leaves, and may enter homes in large numbers during periods of migration and become a considerable nuisance. They do not cause damage inside the home, although they may leave a stain if they are crushed. Centipedes, which have poison glands and can bite, pose an occasional threat to humans.
  • Annual Bluegrass Control in Residential Turfgrass (B 1394) Annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.) is a problematic winter annual weed in residential turf. Compared to most turfgrasses, annual bluegrass has a lighter green color, coarser leaf texture and produces unsightly seedheads. Contrary to its name, both annual (live for one season) and perennial (live for many seasons) biotypes of annual bluegrass may be found in turf. This publication describes methods of control for annual bluegrass in residential turfgrass lawns.
  • Stinging and Biting Pests (C 782) This publication contains descriptions and images, as well as methods of control, for common stinging and biting pests found in Georgia, including: bees, wasps, hornets, fire ants, scorpions, caterpillars, spiders, chiggers and flies.
  • Fireblight: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment (C 871) Fireblight is a destructive, highly infectious, and widespread disease. It attacks blossoms, leaves, shoots, branches, fruits, and roots. This publication has some facts and methods to avoid and control the disease.
  • Weed Control in Home Lawns (B 978) Weeds can be major pests of home lawns. Due to differences in color, leaf size, shape and growth habit, weeds detract from the natural beauty of desirable turfgrasses. Additionally, weeds compete with turfgrasses for sunlight, soil moisture, nutrients and space. Many weeds can quickly become the dominant species in a lawn. This publication contains comprehensive information about weed control in home lawns.
  • Diseases of Leyland Cypress in the Landscape (B 1229) Leyland cypress has become one of the most widely used plants in commercial and residential landscapes across Georgia as a formal hedge, screen, buffer strip or wind barrier. Leyland cypress (x Cupressocyparis leylandii) is a graceful, rapidly growing evergreen tree that is adapted for growth within the 6-10a USDA hardiness zones. Leyland cypress is considered relatively pest-free; however, because of its relatively shallow root system, and because they are often planted too close together and in poorly drained soils, Leyland cypress is prone to root rot and several damaging canker diseases, especially during periods of prolonged drought. Disease management is, therefore, a consideration for Leyland cypress.
  • Deer-Tolerant Ornamental Plants (C 985) If deer are overabundant in your neighborhood, and deer herd reduction or management is not feasible, a good way to prevent deer browsing in landscapes is to plant ornamental plants that deer do not like to eat.
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