UGA Extension Office

Agriculture & Natural Resources

Extension News
Black Flies link Swarms of black flies are making a nuisance of themselves in north Georgia but pose no threat. By Elmer Gray | Published: 4/23/2019
No More Frost link Weather models predict no more frost for most of the Peach State. By Elmer Gray, Pam Knox | Published: 4/8/2019
Forage Management link Lisa Baxter is UGA Extension's newest forage agronomist, based on the UGA Tifton campus. By Elmer Gray, Pam Knox, Clint Thompson | Published: 3/15/2019
El Nino Impact link Wet winter could lead to delayed plantings for some farmers this spring. By Elmer Gray, Pam Knox, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson | Published: 3/15/2019
Soil Erosion link The makeup of your soil can affect the amount of erosion that can occur. By Elmer Gray, Pam Knox, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Bob Westerfield | Published: 3/11/2019
Cool Tips link Keep late frosts from undoing early gardening work with the right materials. By Elmer Gray, Pam Knox, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Bob Westerfield, Merritt Melancon | Published: 3/11/2019
Production Season link South Georgia farmers are still trying to recover from Hurricane Michael. By Elmer Gray, Pam Knox, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Bob Westerfield, Merritt Melancon, Clint Thompson | Published: 2/28/2019
Peach Trees link Trees that are beginning to flower this early in the growing season are more susceptible to a late freeze in March. By Elmer Gray, Pam Knox, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Bob Westerfield, Merritt Melancon, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson | Published: 2/22/2019
Matt Levi link Levi's research with soil properties can help scientists interpret research data and provide a better foundation for soil information. By Elmer Gray, Pam Knox, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Bob Westerfield, Merritt Melancon, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson | Published: 1/28/2019
Onion Crop link Excessive rainfall in Georgia during November and December may raise the risk for potential onion diseases. By Elmer Gray, Pam Knox, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Bob Westerfield, Merritt Melancon, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson | Published: 1/29/2019
Cotton Crop link Between 5 and 10 percent of cotton crop estimated left to be harvested from last year's growing season. By Elmer Gray, Pam Knox, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Bob Westerfield, Merritt Melancon, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson | Published: 1/24/2019
Wood Ash link UGA specialist says that, used sparingly, wood ash can help establish a healthy pH level in garden soil. By Elmer Gray, Pam Knox, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Bob Westerfield, Merritt Melancon, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Sharon Dowdy | Published: 1/17/2019
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Extension Publications
  • Staking and Pruning Tomatoes in the Home Garden (C 1150) This publication gives both consumers and small vegetable farm growers options for providing support to their tomatoes in the vegetable garden. The circular covers the basics of how to successfully use different systems of staking to support tomatoes, how to prune and manage tomato plants for a healthier crop, and the benefits of pruning.
  • Herbicide Injury of Pecan Trees (C 1146) Georgia pecan orchards are often found growing adjacent to fields of annual row crops, timber, and pastures. As a result, the tree canopies of these orchards are susceptible to injury from herbicide drift from the adjacent operations when herbicide applications are made under conditions unsuitable for spraying. Drift may also occur when cotton fields are sprayed with chemical defoliants in the fall. Pecan tree roots often extend into an adjacent row crop fields and can compete with the row crop for available soil, water, and nutrients. Under such conditions, trees may also absorb residual herbicides from the soil in these fields.
  • Georgia Farm Record Book (B 722) This publication is intended to provide you with a useful aid in the business management of your farming operation. Spaces is provided for recording farm receipts and expenses, capital transactions, inventories, credit accounts, net worth statements, crop records, and individual labor records for Social Security purposes.
  • Growing Ferns (B 737) Ferns became popular indoor plants during the Victorian Era. Today, they are used as specimens in atriums, greenhouses and conservatories, and we find them in the smallest apartments and the largest homes. They offer a quiet, graceful beauty by softening landscapes indoors and out.
  • Geraniums (B 790) Geraniums are among the most popular flowering plants grown in the United States. They are easy to grow and can be used in many types of gardens, such as ground beds, planter boxes, hanging baskets and pots. They are ideal for flanking entrance-ways and adding color to border plantings. This publication explains everything you need to know about growing geraniums.
  • Greenhouses: Heating, Cooling and Ventilation (B 792) This publication contains comprehensive, in-depth information about heating, cooling and ventilating greenhouses.
  • Propagating Deciduous Fruit Plants Common to Georgia (B 818) Deciduous fruit plants common to Georgia must be propagated asexually because they do not come true to seed. This makes it necessary to reproduce the desired fruit plants by methods such as cuttings, runners, layering, budding or grafting. This publication discusses the common techniques used to asexually propagate fruit plants adapted to Georgia.
  • Hobby Greenhouses (B 910) The gardener who has a greenhouse can extend or intermingle the seasons at will. Whether you wish to build your own greenhouse from scratch or purchase a prefabricated structure ready for assembly, this publication explains everything you need to know about building and maintaining a hobby greenhouse. This publication also includes several building design plans.
  • Flowering Bulbs for Georgia Gardens (B 918) A wide variety of bulbs grow well in Georgia. Most are grown for their flowers and some for their foliage. They are grown as pot plants, in shrub borders, naturalistic plantings and in mass displays. Bulbs offer a certain magic to the landscape virtually unrivaled by other plants.
  • Conversion Tables, Formulas and Suggested Guidelines for Horticultural Use (B 931) Pesticide and fertilizer recommendations are often made on a pounds per acre and tons per acre basis. While these may be applicable to field production of many crops, orchardists, nurserymen and greenhouse operators often must convert these recommendations to smaller areas, such as row feet, square feet, or even per tree or per pot. Thus pints, cups, ounces, tablespoons and teaspoons are the common units of measure. The conversion is frequently complicated by metric units of measure. This publication is designed to aid growers in making these calculations and conversions, and also provides other data useful in the management, planning and operation of horticultural enterprises.
  • Soil Preparation and Planting Procedures for Ornamental Plants in the Landscape (B 932) Proper planting is essential for healthy, vigorous growth of ornamental plants in the landscape. It assures rapid plant establishment by providing a favorable environment for the developing root system. This publication offers step-by-step guidelines that will help you achieve planting success.
  • Drip Irrigation in Pecans (B 936) Research conducted on drip-irrigated pecans in Georgia over the past several years has shown that drip irrigation is highly beneficial even in wet years. The objective of drip irrigation is to supply each plant with sufficient soil moisture to meet transpiration demands. Drip irrigation offers unique agronomic, agrotechnical and economic advantages for the efficient use of water.
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