UGA Extension Office

Agriculture & Natural Resources

A word on Agriculture...
  • Hello Hall! Posted by Hall Extension on Dec 3, 2018 Stay tuned for future posts as we cover topics related to agriculture and the community in Hall County.
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Extension News
IPM Grant link University of Georgia researchers lead collaborative effort to battle blueberry pest. By Cristina deRevere | Published: 12/14/2018
Peanut Crop link Late spring rains pushed back peanut planting for many Georgia producers. By Cristina deRevere, Clint Thompson | Published: 11/28/2018
Timber link It's best for producers not to salvage moderately damaged tree stands right away. By Cristina deRevere, Clint Thompson, Andrew Sawyer | Published: 11/28/2018
Extension Vegetable Specialist link Andre da Silva's research focus at UGA-Tifton is with fertilizer and irrigation management in vegetables. By Cristina deRevere, Clint Thompson, Andrew Sawyer, Bryce Ethridge | Published: 11/14/2018
Pecan Yields link Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells believes Georgia growers will produce less than 50 million pounds this year. By Cristina deRevere, Clint Thompson, Andrew Sawyer, Bryce Ethridge, Clint Thompson | Published: 11/22/2018
New Plants link Make sure new plants like living in Georgia and in the site you pick. By Cristina deRevere, Clint Thompson, Andrew Sawyer, Bryce Ethridge, Clint Thompson, Tim Daly | Published: 11/20/2018
Grape Growers link Grape growers’ conferences set for Athens and Braselton. By Cristina deRevere, Clint Thompson, Andrew Sawyer, Bryce Ethridge, Clint Thompson, Tim Daly, Sage Barnard | Published: 11/15/2018
Christmas Trees link UGA Extension has several considerations for consumers to be mindful of when choosing a tree for their homes. By Cristina deRevere, Clint Thompson, Andrew Sawyer, Bryce Ethridge, Clint Thompson, Tim Daly, Sage Barnard, Lucy Ray | Published: 11/16/2018
Hurricane Michael Impact link Hurricane in October caused more than $2.5 billion in losses to Georgia's agriculture industry. By Cristina deRevere, Clint Thompson, Andrew Sawyer, Bryce Ethridge, Clint Thompson, Tim Daly, Sage Barnard, Lucy Ray, Clint Thompson | Published: 11/8/2018
Pecan Prices link UGA Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells estimates that pecan growers are receiving significantly less per pound than last year. By Cristina deRevere, Clint Thompson, Andrew Sawyer, Bryce Ethridge, Clint Thompson, Tim Daly, Sage Barnard, Lucy Ray, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson | Published: 11/8/2018
Life-Saving Data link Wind speed data from UGA weather stations helped NWS track Hurricane Michael. By Cristina deRevere, Clint Thompson, Andrew Sawyer, Bryce Ethridge, Clint Thompson, Tim Daly, Sage Barnard, Lucy Ray, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Sharon Dowdy | Published: 11/5/2018
Giant Pumpkins link Georgia's giant pumpkins take center stage this October. By Cristina deRevere, Clint Thompson, Andrew Sawyer, Bryce Ethridge, Clint Thompson, Tim Daly, Sage Barnard, Lucy Ray, Clint Thompson, Clint Thompson, Sharon Dowdy, Sadie Lackey | Published: 10/29/2018
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Staff Listing
Joshua Presley Agriculture & Natural Resources Public Service Professional j.presley@uga.edu 770-535-8290
Extension Publications
  • Standby Electric Power Systems for Agriculture (B 1174) In agriculture, electricity is utilized to control the environment and maintain the life of livestock, poultry and plants, and to prevent food spoilage, avoid financial loss due to failures in harvesting and sorting, and as security of the farm capital investments. A standby power system should be considered as a form of insurance, with the cost of installation and maintenance compared with the potential loss as a result of an extended power outage. A properly sized, installed and maintained standby electric power system can eliminate most of the financial losses and inconveniences resulting from a power outage.
  • Guidelines for Prospective Contract Hatching Egg Producers (B 1214) Producing more than 8 billion pounds of chicken meat requires the support of hatching egg producers. Hatching egg production is a very different business from broiler meat production, as it requires different management skills and greater labor commitments. Because of the uniqueness of the hatching egg business and the long-term investment demands for an operator, it is important that prospective producers understand the managerial and financial requirements before committing to this enterprise. The information in this publication should help those considering hatching egg production as a new enterprise.
  • Land Application of Livestock and Poultry Manure (C 826) This publication provides information on (1) the nutrient content of manures available for land application, (2) how to determine manure application rates and whether supplemental fertilizer will be needed for maximum crop production and (3) how to use management techniques to maximize the fertilization potential of farm manures.
  • Nutrition for the Backyard Flock (C 954) Providing the right nutrition for your chickens means ensuring that what they eat supplies all of the essential amino acids, fatty acids, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and water that they will need to produce the meat or eggs you hope to collect. This publication provides an overview of what you should look for when choosing poultry feed and how to choose a diet that is appropriate for various types of poultry.
  • Management Guide for the Backyard Flock (C 969) This publication focuses on raising a small flock of chickens (50 or less) for meat and eggs (either for hatching or eating).
  • A Review of Georgia's Animal Feeding Operation Regulations (B 1257) This document is intended to be an accurate outline of Georgia’s Animal Waste Regulations at the time of publication, and is not a comprehensive citation. The new regulations require changes in the way AFOs do business. The focus on management of nutrients can improve profitability by better use of nutrients produced on the farms and reduced need for fertilizer purchase. There may also be opportunities for composting and/or selling manures for off-farm uses. Although the new regulations require more record keeping, the records may help improve farm management and productivity. While these regulations may appear complex, they are designed to protect both the farmer and the environment. Compliance with these regulations will provide the farmer with documentation that they are making a conscientious reasonable effort to operate their farm in a safe and environmentally sound manner.
  • Environmental Factors to Control when Brooding Chicks (B 1287) The main objective in brooding chicks is to efficiently and economically provide a comfortable, healthy environment for growing birds. Temperature, air quality, humidity and light are critical factors to consider. Failure to provide the adequate environment during the brooding period will reduce profitability, resulting in reduced growth and development, poorer feed conversion, and increased disease, condemnation and mortality.
  • The Truth about Slime Molds, Spanish Moss, Lichens and Mistletoe (B 999) This publication contains basic information about slime molds, Spanish moss, lichens and mistletoe.
  • Nuisance Myths and Poultry Farming (B 1299) This publication provides factual information about three common myths of poultry farming: that poultry farms will ruin the environment, that they smell, and that the air exhausted from poultry houses will damage property and cause health concerns.
  • Poultry Drinking Water Primer (B 1301) Water is a critical nutrient that receives little attention until a problem arises. Not only should producers make an effort to provide water in adequate quantity, they should also know what is in the water to be used in evaporative cooling systems and consumed by the birds.
  • Biosecurity Basics for Poultry Growers (B 1306) Biosecurity refers to procedures used to prevent the introduction and spread of disease-causing organisms in poultry flocks. Because of the concentration in size and location of poultry flocks in current commercial production operations and the inherent disease risks associated with this type of production, it is imperative that poultry producers practice daily biosecurity measures.
  • Troubleshooting Salmonella in Poultry Processing Plants: Case Studies (B 1310) This publication provides suggestions regarding the proper tuning of a poultry processing plant to meet the USDA-FSIS standards for Salmonella levels, regardless of incoming Salmonella levels.
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From Our Blog
  • Hello Hall! Posted by Hall Extension on Dec 3, 2018 Stay tuned for future posts as we cover topics related to agriculture and the community in Hall County.
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