UGA Extension Office

Nutrition and Health

Chronic Disease Prevention 

Contact Kristen Sumpter, ksumpter@uga.edu, if you are interested in scheduling group classes or workshops on the following topics:

  • Cancer Prevention through Lifestyle Change
  • Diabetes Management
  • Heart Health on a Budget

General Nutrition

Contact Kristen Sumpter, ksumpter@uga.edu, if you are interested in scheduling group classes or workshops on the following topics:

  • Incorporating Local Fruits and Vegetables into Your Diet
  • The Mediterranean Diet
  • Eating Healthy on a Budget
  • Understanding the New Food Label

 

 


Extension Publications
  • So Easy To Preserve (B 989) The 6th edition of this popular book is available for purchase only. The 388-page book covers topics on Preserving Food, Canning, Pickled Products, Sweet Spreads and Syrups, Freezing and Drying. There are 10 new products and two revised product recommendations in this edition. It's suitable for both new and veteran food preservers. Information on how to purchase this for-sale publication is available at: http://setp.uga.edu
  • Jams and Jellies (FDNS-E-43-08) Sweet spreads—butters, jellies, jams, conserves, marmalades and preserves—add zest to meals. All contain the four essential ingredients needed to make a jellied fruit product–fruit, pectin, acid and sugar. They differ, however, depending upon fruit used, proportion of different ingredients, method of preparation and density of the fruit pulp. This publication deals with the basics of making jellies and jams, without adding pectin. Information on ingredients, equipment, and the canning process are provided in this publication. Recipes for jellies and jams are also included. For more information on food preservation, visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation online at http://nchfp.uga.edu.
  • Canning Tomatoes and Tomato Products (FDNS-E-43-02) When tomatoes are canned, they are heated hot enough and long enough to destroy organisms that can make people sick in addition to spoilage organisms. Tomatoes are treated as an acid food for canning purposes. Many tomato products may be safely canned in a boiling water canner. However, because some tomatoes can be slightly low-acid for canning purposes, added acid is required in the boiling water canning of plain tomatoes, juice and sauce. This publication provides directions for canning a variety of tomato products as well as the equipment and procedures necessary for this type of food preparation. For more information on food preservation, visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation online at http://nchfp.uga.edu.
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