UGA Extension Office

Soil Testing

Soil test are used to determine a wide range of nutritional deficiencies by providing detailed information on the nutrient status and recommendations for improvement. Soil test can be used to establish new, diagnose existing, and maintain successful lawns, gardens and crop stands.

Our most common soil test, the routine soil test, test for the basic soil nutrients and minerals such as:

  • pH (soil acidity)
  • Calcium (Ca)
  • Lime requirements
  • Magnesium (Mg)
  • Phosphorous (P)
  • Zinc (Zn)
  • Potassium (K)
  • Manganese (Mn)

In addition to the routine soil test, there are several other test available, better suited for commercial applications. Consult with an agent before requesting any additional soil test to determine which would best benefit you. Allow seven (7) to ten (10) business days for completed test results, and if you have any questions about the results and how to interpret the recommendations, feel free to meet with an agent.

Contact

For general questions, or more information about Soil Testing in Fulton County, please contact your local Extension office.

 


Soil Testing
Extension Publications
  • Your Household Water Quality: Odors in Your Water (C 1016) Homeowners sometimes experience unpleasant odors in their household water. In many cases, the exact cause of the odor is difficult to determine by water testing; however, this publication provides a few general recommendations for treating some common causes of household water odors.
  • Native Plants for Georgia Part I: Trees, Shrubs and Woody Vines (B 987) This publication focuses on native trees, shrubs and woody vines for Georgia. It is not our intent to describe all native species — just those available in the nursery trade and those that the authors feel have potential for nursery production and landscape use. Rare or endangered species are not described. Information on each plant is provided according to the following categories: Common Name(s)/Botanical Name/Family, Characteristics, Landscape Uses, Size, Zones and Habitat.
  • Conversion Tables, Formulas and Suggested Guidelines for Horticultural Use (B 931) Pesticide and fertilizer recommendations are often made on a pounds per acre and tons per acre basis. While these may be applicable to field production of many crops, orchardists, nurserymen and greenhouse operators often must convert these recommendations to smaller areas, such as row feet, square feet, or even per tree or per pot. Thus pints, cups, ounces, tablespoons and teaspoons are the common units of measure. The conversion is frequently complicated by metric units of measure. This publication is designed to aid growers in making these calculations and conversions, and also provides other data useful in the management, planning and operation of horticultural enterprises.
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Extension Publications
  • Soil Salinity Testing, Data Interpretation and Recommendations (C 1019) The University of Georgia Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratories offer soil salinity testing to help farmers and the general public diagnose and manage problems associated with soil salinity. By definition, a saline soil contains excess soluble salts that reduce the growth of most crops or ornamental plants. This publication discusses soil salinity testing, data interpretation and recommendations, specifically those pertaining to the University of Georgia.
  • Soil Preparation and Planting Procedures for Ornamental Plants in the Landscape (B 932) Proper planting is essential for healthy, vigorous growth of ornamental plants in the landscape. It assures rapid plant establishment by providing a favorable environment for the developing root system. This publication offers step-by-step guidelines that will help you achieve planting success.
  • Cation Exchange Capacity and Base Saturation (C 1040) Cation exchange capacity (CEC) is a measure of the total negative charges within the soil that adsorb plant nutrient cations such as calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+) and potassium (K+). As such, the CEC is a property of a soil that describes its capacity to supply nutrient cations to the soil solution for plant uptake.
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Extension News
  • UGA Dairy link Mary Ethel, the calf, makes her debut at UGA Teaching Dairy. By Merritt Melancon | Published: 6/22/2018
  • Honeybee 101 link Learn some bee biology during National Pollinator Week. By Josh Fuder | Published: 6/20/2018
  • Peach Crop link Increased chill hours are a big reason Georgia is having a better year with its peaches. By Clint Thompson | Published: 6/20/2018
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