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Lawn & Garden News
  • Insect ID link Ten workshops from UGA Structural Pest Management Program include insect ID lesson. By Cristina deRevere | Published: 8/17/2018
  • Pollinator Census link UGA launches one-year countdown to Georgia's first statewide pollinator census in August 2019. By Merritt Melancon | Published: 8/16/2018
  • Pests in Schools link Pest control operators across the Southeast can enroll in UGA program to learn to control pests in schools. By Cristina deRevere | Published: 8/14/2018
  • Vineyard Tour link Georgia wine growers open up their vineyards for early August farm tour. By Merritt Melancon | Published: 8/13/2018
  • Williams Honored link At 75, 'Mr. Bamboo' still tends bamboo groves at UGA's coastal garden. By Sharon Dowdy | Published: 8/9/2018
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Lawn & Garden Publications
  • Native Plants for Georgia Part I: Trees, Shrubs and Woody Vines (B 987) This publication focuses on native trees, shrubs and woody vines for Georgia. It is not our intent to describe all native species — just those available in the nursery trade and those that the authors feel have potential for nursery production and landscape use. Rare or endangered species are not described. Information on each plant is provided according to the following categories: Common Name(s)/Botanical Name/Family, Characteristics, Landscape Uses, Size, Zones and Habitat.
  • Vegetable Garden Calendar (C 943) The recommendations in this circular are based on long-term average dates of the last killing frost in the spring and first killing frost in the fall. Every year does not conform to the "average," so you should use your own judgment about advancing or delaying the time for each job, depending on weather conditions.
  • Key to Diseases of Oaks in the Landscape (B 1286) This publication contains a guide to diseases of oak trees in the landscape.
  • Millipedes and Centipedes (B 1088) Millipedes and centipedes do not carry diseases that affect people, animals or plants. Millipedes do occasionally damage seedlings by feeding on stems and leaves, and may enter homes in large numbers during periods of migration and become a considerable nuisance. They do not cause damage inside the home, although they may leave a stain if they are crushed. Centipedes, which have poison glands and can bite, pose an occasional threat to humans.
  • Landscape Plants for Georgia (B 625) This publication includes a list of good plants for Georgia organized into various sizes and groups. The design qualities of plants—their form, size, color and texture—are emphasized according to the principles and requirements of good landscape design and plant maintenance. Hardiness and disease and insect resistant qualities are also considered.
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